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Carbon Monoxide

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NEWS
December 28, 2009
Baltimore County fire officials say one of four people who suffered carbon monoxide poisoning in a Fullerton apartment complex more than a week ago has died. Two women, a man and an 11-month-old girl were hospitalized on Dec. 18 after the carbon monoxide leak on Twincrest Court. Fire officials say one of the women died Saturday. Investigators haven't determined the case of the leak. Last week, the Baltimore County Council passed a law that requires all rental units heated by fuel burning equipment to have carbon monoxide detectors.
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HEALTH
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Although hookah lounges are becoming more popular, smoking flavored tobacco through water pipes creates hazardous concentrations of indoor air pollution, according to a new study from the Institute for Global Tobacco Control at the Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. In fact, airborne particulate matter and carbon monoxide levels exceeded those found in restaurants and bars that allowed cigarette smoking, the study found. "There is a mistaken notion that because the tobacco smoke is drawn through the water, it's somehow cleaner or not as bad," Patrick Breysse, a professor in the department of environmental health sciences and the study's senior author, said in an interview.
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NEWS
December 29, 2009
Baltimore County police have identified a Fullerton woman who died Saturday while being treated for carbon monoxide poisoning. Pandora Spriggs, 44, was one of four people who suffered carbon monoxide poisoning Dec. 18 at the Eagles Crest apartment complex in Fullerton. Spriggs, another woman, a man and an 11-month-old girl were hospitalized after the carbon monoxide leak at 7508 Twincrest Court. Spriggs was later taken to a hyperbaric chamber at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Investigators have not determined the cause of the leak.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Nine people required medical treatment following a carbon monoxide leak at The Westin Baltimore Washington Airport hotel in Linthicum Sunday afternoon. At around 1:30 p.m., fire officials detected high levels of carbon monoxide after a paramedic was initially called to the hotel, at 1100 Old Elkridge Landing Road, to treat an employee who reported feeling faint, said Lt. Russ Davis, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Fire Department. Fire crews then evacuated the hotel, which had 64 occupied rooms.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Victims of carbon monoxide poisoning often mistake their symptoms for the flu and fail to get help, a sometimes deadly mistake, say doctors who see more cases in the winter months. That's when malfunctioning furnaces and improperly ventilated fireplaces come on and some people use appliances such as stoves for heat. "It's a problem across the country," said Dr. Clifford S. Mitchell, from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration.
NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | December 19, 2009
Four people, including a baby, were taken from a Baltimore County apartment complex to hospitals Friday afternoon with carbon monoxide poisoning. When firefighters arrived at the Eagles Crest Complex in Fullerton, they found a 20-year-old woman holding an 11-month-old unconscious girl, said Fire Department spokeswoman Elise Armacost. They had made it out of their unit at 7508 Twincrest Court, but crews had to rescue a 44-year-old woman who was unconscious in the apartment, she said.
NEWS
November 11, 2009
Baltimore county firefighters detected dangerous carbon monoxide levels late Monday in a unit at Cove Village Townhomes, a community that has been beset by carbon monoxide leaks. It was the 31st call this year from Cove Village about carbon monoxide. Elise Armacost, a Fire Department spokeswoman, said firefighters detected levels of 40 parts per million in the home. The department recommends evacuation at levels of 100 ppm, and considers it a "medical alert" at 35 ppm. The latest alert came when a mother of two called authorities to say that her carbon monoxide detector had gone off while she was cooking and that she felt ill. The 299-unit complex owned by Sawyer Realty Holdings has a history of carbon monoxide problems.
NEWS
By Robert Little | February 7, 2010
Even before the snowfall began, weather forecasters and emergency management officials were warning Marylanders about a little-discussed but increasingly common threat from any weather-related emergency: carbon monoxide poisoning. Weather that causes power outages is often followed by reports of carbon monoxide poisoning from gasoline-powered generators. But mammoth snowfalls also cover and block vehicle exhaust pipes, which can cause carbon monoxide to build up inside the passenger area.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Seven Elkridge residents were in stable condition Sunday after being hospitalized with carbon monoxide poisoning. Several of the residents had already evacuated the home in the 5800 block of Main St. by the time Howard County and Baltimore County rescue units arrived just before midnight Saturday, officials said. Officials said that five of the seven residents had high levels of carbon monoxide in their systems and that all seven were taken to the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Turkey, duck, chicken or turducken — whatever you're cooking on Thanksgiving, make sure you're not whipping up a dangerous side of carbon monoxide. With a busy holiday and a house full of guests, it can be easy to leave the oven on and forget to ventilate properly, officials warn. The Baltimore Fire Department saw an "alarming strike," with 45 calls last Thanksgiving for carbon monoxide alarms, nearly five times as many as the average day, spokesman Ian Brennan said. "It's a completely preventable situation on Thanksgiving Day," he said.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 7, 2014
As the temperatures in Harford County drop to extreme lows, people often depend on multiple types of heating sources to stay warm inside their homes, which often leads to an increase in the potential for house fires. Maryland State Fire Marshal Brian S. Geraci recently released several life- and home-saving heating safety tips to consider during periods of extreme cold. "Elements of heating resources continue to be a significant factor in home fires in Maryland," Geraci said in a news release.
NEWS
January 5, 2014
Your recent on the need for carbon monoxide detectors addressed an important issue ( "A life-saving gift for 2014," Dec. 29). However, it would have been of even greater value to those who live in Baltimore had it made readers aware of the city's very broad law which I wrote and the City Council passed in 2008. Every dwelling in the city, whether newly constructed or already existing, as well as hotel, motel, boarding and rooming house, or other part of a building that provides living or sleeping facilities for one or more individuals, must install a carbon monoxide alarm in a central location outside of each sleeping area if it uses gas or fossil fuel for heating, cooking, hot water or clothes-drying; is attached to a garage; or has a gas- or wood-burning fireplace.
NEWS
December 29, 2013
For those looking for a fairly simple and pain-free resolution for the new year, here's one: Get a carbon monoxide detector for your home or business or both. If you already have one, perhaps it's time to change the batteries or at least test them. On one single day this month - Thursday, Dec. 19 to be exact - a total of 10 people were taken to local hospitals after carbon monoxide leaks in their Baltimore County homes. The two incidents, both in Dundalk but otherwise unrelated, involved faulty furnaces.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Ten people were taken to hospitals after carbon monoxide leaks in two Dundalk homes Thursday morning, Baltimore County fire officials said. Both carbon monoxide incidents are believed to be caused by malfunctioning furnaces, and neither home had carbon monoxide detectors, said Lt. Paul Massarelli, a county fire spokesman. Fire department officials were first called to the 1600 block of Manor Road for a report of an unconscious seizure patient, but found others complaining of carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms, Massarelli said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Turkey, duck, chicken or turducken — whatever you're cooking on Thanksgiving, make sure you're not whipping up a dangerous side of carbon monoxide. With a busy holiday and a house full of guests, it can be easy to leave the oven on and forget to ventilate properly, officials warn. The Baltimore Fire Department saw an "alarming strike," with 45 calls last Thanksgiving for carbon monoxide alarms, nearly five times as many as the average day, spokesman Ian Brennan said. "It's a completely preventable situation on Thanksgiving Day," he said.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
An explosion in a Nottingham apartment building Thursday afternoon forced the evacuation of all residents after the building was flooded with lethal carbon monoxide gas. The two-alarm blast caused no damage to the building and there were no injuries, according to Baltimore County Fire Lt. Paul Massarelli. He said rescuers were dispatched to 3907 Hannon Court at 2:30 p.m. to investigate a complaint of an electrical odor emanating from the complex's mechanical room. After firefighters arrived, the electrical transformer on the exterior of the complex exploded, engulfing the premises in the deadly gas and engulfing two vehicles in flames.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Eight residents and staff members of a group home in Parkville were taken to area hospitals — six of them to Maryland Shock Trauma Center — for possible chemical exposure in the home early Monday morning, according to Baltimore County fire officials. County fire officials said late Monday that they had detected carbon monoxide in the home, in the 2800 block of Hillcrest Avenue, and that it was the apparent cause of the illness. However, the fire department was unable to find the source of the carbon monoxide and said the Maryland Department of the Environment will have to investigate further.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Forward. It's more than a presidential campaign slogan. It's also a directive on the second Sunday of March - this weekend - for clocks in the United States to move forward one hour under daylight-saving time. This means more afternoon sun. The official clocks of the United States government will change by an hour at 2 a.m. Sunday, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, which regulates daylight savings and time zones in the country. Clocks detached from today's omnipresent Internet will have to be changed manually - unless you are in the rare places in the United States, such as parts of Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and other island territories that don't prescribe to the change.
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