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By KATHLEEN PARKER | November 29, 2007
Hey, did you hear the one about the woman who aborted her kid so she could save the planet? That's no joke, but Darwin must be chuckling somewhere. Toni Vernelli was one of two women recently featured in a London Daily Mail story about environmentalists who take their carbon footprint very, very seriously. So seriously, in fact, that Ms. Vernelli aborted a pregnancy and, at age 27, had herself sterilized. Baby-making, she says, is "selfish" and "all about maintaining your genetic line at the expense of the planet."
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Laurel Peltier and Guest blogger | May 17, 2013
(An earlier version of this post included incorrect information about Maryland Gas & Electric, its pricing and whether it offers a "green" gas plan involving carbon offsets. The Sun regrets the errors.) ---------------- (Another in an occasional series of guest posts by GreenLaurel.com blogger Laurel Peltier) Marylanders have a choice in purchasing electricity for their homes to buy "green" power generated by wind turbines. They don't have as many options when it comes to natural gas for heating and cooking, but there is one company offering consumers a convenient if slightly pricier way to reduce the climate impact of their fuel choice -- through carbon offsets.
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FEATURES
Laurel Peltier and Guest blogger | May 17, 2013
(An earlier version of this post included incorrect information about Maryland Gas & Electric, its pricing and whether it offers a "green" gas plan involving carbon offsets. The Sun regrets the errors.) ---------------- (Another in an occasional series of guest posts by GreenLaurel.com blogger Laurel Peltier) Marylanders have a choice in purchasing electricity for their homes to buy "green" power generated by wind turbines. They don't have as many options when it comes to natural gas for heating and cooking, but there is one company offering consumers a convenient if slightly pricier way to reduce the climate impact of their fuel choice -- through carbon offsets.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
I became frightened when I read the commentary by Norman Meadow ("Nuclear blows away wind," Feb. 1). I wanted to say so much, but my thoughts were running way beyond the commentary. Just one example: The reactor at Chernobyl still contains enough radioactive material to destroy Europe. The only thing stopping it is a decaying sarcophagus. Mr. Meadow doesn't mention this. Nuclear waste is another example. The very first drop is still around. Reality is, there is nothing that can be done about the waste.
NEWS
By Todd R. Nelson | April 9, 2008
CASTINE, Maine -- Being a good citizen these days, we're told, means striving to reduce our carbon footprint - to walk in a way that reduces our detrimental effect on the planet's biosphere. A "footprint" is a good metaphor for our individual impact on the social or natural environment. It's personal, tactile, organic, and immediately comprehensible. It's elementary. We're bipeds; we all walk and leave tracks. At my school, the students in sixth-grade science class can calculate the size of their carbon footprint with an online tool - based on heating fuel, car type and annual mileage, electricity use, and other factors.
NEWS
August 5, 2009
When it comes to what people put on the roofs of their houses, ugly is in the eye of the beholder. Some people love rooftop decks. Some people think they're eyesores that destroy the historic nature of Baltimore's waterfront communities. (And some people love their rooftop decks and hate everybody else's.) But what if the structure you're trying to put on top of your house has a purpose more noble than providing a good place to drink beer and watch the fireworks? That question is dividing Federal Hill over the effort by one homeowner, Marsha Vitow, to install a small wind turbine on top of her rowhouse.
NEWS
By Ruth Goldstein | August 6, 2009
Now that Baltimore City has had its first wind turbine zoning case, it's time for metropolitan Baltimore to get serious about a regional advisory panel on renewable energy resources. Baltimore County has been grappling with this issue since last year, when a farmer in Phoenix wanted to erect a 120-foot windmill on his 97-acre property - far larger than the 8-foot turbine a city zoning panel rejected for a rowhouse rooftop in Federal Hill. In the county, which, like Baltimore, had no regulations to provide guidance, the zoning commissioner granted the request.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
I agree with Mike Tidwell that fossil-fuel-based global warming is producing violent changes in our weather - something that only the most die-hard right-wingers (think Rush Limbaugh) and those in the hip pocket of the oil industry (think Tom Coburn) are still denying ("Going to extremes," July 6). But to only offer wind, solar and geothermal power as solutions really just sidesteps the problem, and in the case of electric cars does nothing at all (at least until our electricity doesn't come mostly from burning coal and natural gas)
NEWS
By Bob Doppelt | September 9, 2008
EUGENE, Ore. - Cap and trade" is the rage today as a primary solution to global warming. But the European Union's struggle with this approach indicates it has an uncertain future. This is because global warming, at its core, is not a technology or policy problem. Rather, it is a failure of thought - perhaps the greatest such failure in human history. Attempts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions will fail unless people first alter their thinking and behavior. Earth is warming because humans, primarily in industrialized nations, suffer from "systems blindness.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
I became frightened when I read the commentary by Norman Meadow ("Nuclear blows away wind," Feb. 1). I wanted to say so much, but my thoughts were running way beyond the commentary. Just one example: The reactor at Chernobyl still contains enough radioactive material to destroy Europe. The only thing stopping it is a decaying sarcophagus. Mr. Meadow doesn't mention this. Nuclear waste is another example. The very first drop is still around. Reality is, there is nothing that can be done about the waste.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
I agree with Mike Tidwell that fossil-fuel-based global warming is producing violent changes in our weather - something that only the most die-hard right-wingers (think Rush Limbaugh) and those in the hip pocket of the oil industry (think Tom Coburn) are still denying ("Going to extremes," July 6). But to only offer wind, solar and geothermal power as solutions really just sidesteps the problem, and in the case of electric cars does nothing at all (at least until our electricity doesn't come mostly from burning coal and natural gas)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
Farming in the city doesn't need a lot of land - and sometimes not even arable land. On a South Baltimore parking lot, inside six plastic-covered greenhouses, a handful of urban farmers are raising a cornucopia of greens in a thin layer of imported soil. Once the site of the city's maintenance garage, the half-acre "farm" on the paved-over brownfield by the Middle Branch now produces arugula, romaine, spring onions, basil, cilantro, fennel - even spicy edible flowers. And it's all organic, the growers say. Big City Farms is the name of this budding agricultural enterprise, operating on land now owned by the National Aquarium.
NEWS
April 29, 2010
Mike Tidwell ("Local action, global lesson," April 22) makes some great points about how incentives are key to changing behaviors. I absolutely agree. But his question about which policy change is best for stimulating rapid climate improvements is off-target. As individuals, 95 percent of us have the power to drastically reduce our carbon footprints, right here and now, without waiting for new legislation, policy changes, improved enforcement or construction of renewable energy projects.
NEWS
By Ruth Goldstein | August 6, 2009
Now that Baltimore City has had its first wind turbine zoning case, it's time for metropolitan Baltimore to get serious about a regional advisory panel on renewable energy resources. Baltimore County has been grappling with this issue since last year, when a farmer in Phoenix wanted to erect a 120-foot windmill on his 97-acre property - far larger than the 8-foot turbine a city zoning panel rejected for a rowhouse rooftop in Federal Hill. In the county, which, like Baltimore, had no regulations to provide guidance, the zoning commissioner granted the request.
NEWS
August 5, 2009
When it comes to what people put on the roofs of their houses, ugly is in the eye of the beholder. Some people love rooftop decks. Some people think they're eyesores that destroy the historic nature of Baltimore's waterfront communities. (And some people love their rooftop decks and hate everybody else's.) But what if the structure you're trying to put on top of your house has a purpose more noble than providing a good place to drink beer and watch the fireworks? That question is dividing Federal Hill over the effort by one homeowner, Marsha Vitow, to install a small wind turbine on top of her rowhouse.
NEWS
By Bob Doppelt | September 9, 2008
EUGENE, Ore. - Cap and trade" is the rage today as a primary solution to global warming. But the European Union's struggle with this approach indicates it has an uncertain future. This is because global warming, at its core, is not a technology or policy problem. Rather, it is a failure of thought - perhaps the greatest such failure in human history. Attempts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions will fail unless people first alter their thinking and behavior. Earth is warming because humans, primarily in industrialized nations, suffer from "systems blindness.
NEWS
By Julie Sensat Waldren | May 16, 2008
MADISON, Wis. - I do my part for the planet. I recycle, and I've been known to bring a canvas bag to the grocery store. Yet I'm starting to find all these messages on greening hard to take. The advice is often impractical. For instance, I should walk, bike or take the bus to work. Sounds great in a perfect world, but my job requires trips to a city 70 miles away, a compromise for my two-career family. I'd drive a hybrid car, but they're still a bit pricey for the likes of young professionals such as me. I'd ride light rail, if they'd build it, and if cities offered reliable public transportation, I'd be there.
NEWS
June 13, 2007
More than 280 college presidents - including the head of Maryland's flagship public university - pledged yesterday to fight global warming by making their campuses "climate neutral." Signers of the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment, which was inspired by similar collective efforts among cities and businesses, are pledging to work toward neutralizing greenhouse gas emissions on campus and to increase global warming research and education efforts. Among Maryland college presidents who have signed the pledge are C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr. of the University of Maryland, College Park; Jonathan C. Gibralter of Frostburg University; Joan Develin Coley of McDaniel College; and Baird Tipson of Washington College.
NEWS
August 10, 2008
Green energy plan creates more jobs Sen. John McCain said Tuesday in Michigan that new nuclear reactors mean "new jobs." Marylanders need look no further than the proposed third reactor at Calvert Cliffs to see what nuclear power really means in terms of jobs. According to a study by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, we could create 12,000 "green" jobs in the state by 2025 by investing in energy efficiency, combined heat and power technology and better management of our transmission system.
NEWS
By Julie Sensat Waldren | May 16, 2008
MADISON, Wis. - I do my part for the planet. I recycle, and I've been known to bring a canvas bag to the grocery store. Yet I'm starting to find all these messages on greening hard to take. The advice is often impractical. For instance, I should walk, bike or take the bus to work. Sounds great in a perfect world, but my job requires trips to a city 70 miles away, a compromise for my two-career family. I'd drive a hybrid car, but they're still a bit pricey for the likes of young professionals such as me. I'd ride light rail, if they'd build it, and if cities offered reliable public transportation, I'd be there.
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