Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCarbon Dioxide
IN THE NEWS

Carbon Dioxide

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 18, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial "Too much carbon, too little time" (Sept. 11) is in line with the global warming arguments which are based on forecasts rather than accumulated technical and political realities. The article states that CO2 levels are 142 percent higher today than before the Industrial Revolution which began about 1800. At that time there were 1 billion people in the world; today there are 7 billion; by 2050 there will be 9 billion and by 2100 there will be 12 billion. This is a 1,200 percent increase in population since 1800.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial "Too much carbon, too little time" (Sept. 11) is in line with the global warming arguments which are based on forecasts rather than accumulated technical and political realities. The article states that CO2 levels are 142 percent higher today than before the Industrial Revolution which began about 1800. At that time there were 1 billion people in the world; today there are 7 billion; by 2050 there will be 9 billion and by 2100 there will be 12 billion. This is a 1,200 percent increase in population since 1800.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2000
WASHINGTON - President Clinton called yesterday for new federal regulations limiting power plants' emissions of carbon dioxide, a gas thought to cause global climatic change, through a system similar to the rules in place for pollutants that cause smog and acid rain. It would be the first time federal regulations would specifically control emissions of carbon dioxide, the main so-called greenhouse gas. Clinton called for similar controls on emissions of mercury, another pollutant that is given off by some power plants but is not regulated under air pollution laws.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
If increasingly extreme weather events around the world weren't alarming enough, the latest monitoring by the World Meteorological Organization shows last year was the worst ever for rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Their report released Tuesday demonstrates why efforts to curb climate change deserve to be a top priority for U.S. foreign policy. The WMO tracks not just the greenhouse gases emitted by power plants, motor vehicles, factories and other major contributors but what the net effect is on the atmosphere since a certain amount of carbon dioxide is naturally absorbed by plants and oceans.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 2, 2009
A federal plan to limit carbon-dioxide emissions would cripple small business, subject Americans to "reckless taxes" and increase "wasteful Washington spending," contends House Minority Leader John Boehner. Does he know that a similar scheme already operates in 10 states from Maryland to Maine? Today, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative will auction off its sixth batch of permits in an effort to reduce power-plant CO2 emissions 10 percent by 2018. So far, it's costing Maryland families maybe $1.50 a month, according to Baltimore Gas & Electric.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | December 30, 2011
  Ever wonder how all those bubbles got into the champagne? Just in time for your New Year's toasts, the American Chemical Society has created a video with an explanation. Unlike other wine, which undergoes one fermentation process, champagne undergoes two. Carbon dioxide gas is trapped during the second one and it dissolves into the wine and forms the bubbles. The bubbles ascend along the length of the bottle, dragging the molecules of the carbon dioxide and about 600 other chemicals that form the aroma and flavor of the champagne.
NEWS
By Phillip Davis and Phillip Davis,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 23, 1990
SHADY SIDE -- In a brackish marsh hard by the Chesapeake Bay, scientists are beginning to suspect that the "greenhouse effect" may not be the environmental disaster it was once thought it might be.Many plants, it seems, love increased amounts of carbon dioxide -- the gas that cars, power plants and factories spew into the air by the billions of tons.Researchers at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center here have spent $1.2 million and five years discovering something greenhouse farmers have known for decades: More carbon dioxide means faster plant growth and reproduction.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
The friendly tree doctor peers through his pop-bottle eyeglasses and asks that proverbial pick-your-poison question: "You want the good news first or the bad news first?"For more than a decade, Bert Drake has been studying the effects of global warming and increased carbon-dioxide levels on the earth's ecosystems. On one hand, the Anne Arundel County scientist talks about the standard gloom-and-doom findings about the dire consequences of deforestation, traffic emissions and the burning of fossil fuels.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
There's yet another downside to our warming climate: bigger and badder poison ivy. When researchers adjusted carbon dioxide levels to match those anticipated during the next 50 years, poison ivy in an experimental pine forest grew much faster and was far more toxic than the plant that annoys us today. In fact, the experimental plants grew twice as fast as normal poison ivy, and their leaves contained a more allergenic form of urushiol, the carbon-based compound that causes contact dermatitis, scientists said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 16, 2005
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was justified in refusing to regulate carbon dioxide, the primary greenhouse gas linked to global warming, as a pollutant under the Clean Air Act, a federal court ruled yesterday in a major legal victory for the Bush administration. A coalition of 12 states and numerous groups - including the city of Baltimore - had argued that the EPA was legally bound to regulate carbon dioxide under the Clean Air Act because global warming was a demonstrable threat to public health and safety.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
When the Obama administration unveils its plan today for fighting climate change by clamping down on power plant emissions, it will try to get the rest of the nation to join an effort already underway in Maryland and a number of other states. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy is expected to announce rules under the Clean Air Act to cut carbon pollution from existing power plants, the single largest source of climate-warming emissions in the United States.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
It's my understanding that the Baltimore County Council, including Catonsville's own Tom Quirk, passed legislation making it a crime — punishable by a fine of up to $50 — to smoke a cigarette at outdoor playgrounds, tot lots, dog parks, athletic fields, and anywhere within 30 feet of buildings in which Baltimore County sporting events are held. Why? Mostly to protect the children from possibly inhaling secondhand smoke while in the great outdoors or outside buildings in which they may be playing or watching games.
NEWS
March 2, 2014
In response to the editorial, "Climate change's day in court" (Feb. 26), it does seem that court cases on climate change result in very slow actions. After all, it has been almost seven years since the ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA stating that EPA has the right to regulate carbon dioxide emissions under the Clean Air Act, yet we have continued to have business as usual. Let's forget about the courts and instead use the free market to tackle carbon dioxide emissions by implementing a carbon fee. The fee can be placed on all products sold in this country and begin as low as $15 per ton of carbon dioxide emitted.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
It came as no surprise to hear that certain U.S. Supreme Court justices hold misgivings about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants - and potentially other stationary sources. In arguments before the court Monday, it was apparent that even some of the liberal justices have doubts about how far the EPA's statutory authority can be pushed in this regard. But one thing was also clear, at least if one can draw conclusions based on the questions presented to the lawyers arguing Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA: A majority of the court appears content to let stand its 2007 ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA that held that the agency can consider carbon dioxide a pollutant despite its ubiquity.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | December 25, 2013
What's so wrong with palm oil, from the palm trees that bear fruit, not coconuts? Well, if you listen to environmentalists and animal-rights advocates along with nutrition and health experts, they'll tell you it's something close to poison. Once the United States and other Western countries began condemning and banning trans-fat oils a few years ago, palm oil became a popular substitute. You can find it in shampoo, lipstick, soap and a host of snack and other foods, including some ketchups, margarine, chewing gum, candy bars and cooking oil. Oil-palm trees, as they're called, are grown primarily in Indonesia and Malaysia, and that's where the problems begin.
NEWS
By Mark Hofberg | December 10, 2013
What can I do to help the environment? As a master's student in conservation biology and environmental policy, I get this question often from my (mostly) left-leaning, but financially focused, friends. They generally understand that the environment is important, but with long work hours and an overflow "green" products and tips in the media, there is confusion about what is effective or even useful. There is a simple way to help; one that does not require wearing hemp or even scrapping your car (although that would be nice)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | September 30, 2008
Maryland earned nearly $16.4 million last week in the nation's first mandatory auction of rights for power plants to release climate-changing pollution, state officials reported yesterday. Most of the proceeds will go toward promoting energy efficiency among the state's electricity consumers and for providing some relief from soaring power bills. "It couldn't have gone any better," Shari T. Wilson, state secretary of the environment, said of Thursday's auction of allowances permitting power plants to emit carbon dioxide.
NEWS
By New York Times | February 15, 1991
CHANTILLY, Va. -- Fulfilling a promise it made almost two weeks ago, the United States says it will negotiate limits on emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases thought by scientists to cause global warming.The United States also said yesterday it would consider providing financial and technical assistance to less developed nations that will be asked to halt the cutting of their rain forests and take other actions to curb the threat from rising temperatures around the world. Some of the actions could harm their economies.
NEWS
August 6, 2013
Having had the opportunity to attend the recent Maryland Climate Change Summit, it was both enlightening and reassuring that our governor, the legislature and our state agencies are taking proactive positions in planning for what cannot be stopped and a leadership role in reducing what is driving temperature increases so that future impacts may be constrained, primarily those of sea level rise and flooding. With 3,200 miles of bay and ocean coastline, Maryland has already lost 13 islands, and as sea levels continue to rise, we will lose thousands more low lying acres over the next decade, including marshes, forests, farms and developed land.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.