Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCarbohydrates
IN THE NEWS

Carbohydrates

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
FEATURES
February 20, 1994
The Howard County Arts Council presented its 1993 Outstanding Artist Award to Ellen Kennedy, one of the founders of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, and its 1993 Outstanding Arts Educator Award to Valerie Costantini, chair, performing arts division at Howard Community College.*Johns Hopkins University biophysicist Ernesto Freire has been awarded a $110,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson to study themolecular forces that control how blood clots.*Saul Roseman, a biology professor at Johns Hopkins University who has spend more than 40 years in research on complexcarbohydrates, has received the 1993 Karl Meyer Award for his work.
FEATURES
March 27, 1991
Easy cheese and pasta is low in fat, high in carbohydrates, and provides important nutrients, including protein. The dish takes about 10 minutes to prepare.Cook fun-shaped pasta like wagon wheels or rotelle. Add frozen peas and corn kernels during the last minute of cooking time. Drain and toss with shredded Cheddar cheese until it melts. Add cherry tomatoes and prepared salsa.Easy Cheese and Pasta8 ounces (3 1/4 cups) wagon wheel or rotelle pasta1 cup frozen peas1 cup frozen corn kernels4 ounces (about 1 cup)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2010
Lorraine Engel of Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe that was in her family for generations but has been misplaced - one for a hot milk cake. Rosemary Kingsley of Olney sent in her recipe for this simple, old-fashioned classic. She said this is her go-to cake for most family celebrations. It is extremely adaptable, perfectly delicious served plain or dressed up with fresh berries or just about any type of frosting or glaze you can come up with. It can be baked in almost any shape pan: round, rectangular, tube or bundt.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | July 4, 2004
If I have the energy, is there any reason not to exercise on an empty stomach? Al Douex Jr., an athletic trainer at Union Memorial Hospital, says that in general a short workout on an empty stomach is OK. However, if your goal is to tone muscle or burn fat, not eating something beforehand is a mistake. Without sufficient glycogen stores to convert to energy, it is unlikely you will have the strength or endurance to reach the fat-burning phase of your workout. While you don't need to indulge in a five-course meal, make sure you've eaten something (even just a banana or half a bagel)
NEWS
By Judith Blake and Judith Blake,SEATTLE TIMES | November 19, 2004
They puckered, they grimaced, they made every kind of face. But when a panel of volunteers, all of them runners or cyclists, taste-tested selected "energy gels" designed to boost athletic vigor, they gave a qualified thumbs up to at least some of them. And a vehement "No way!" to others. The tasters were sampling some of the gels that have been appearing in growing variety on the shelves of sports-supply stores under such brand names as Gu, Power Gel, Clif Shot, Carb-Boom, Cytomax Gulp N' Go, Crank Sports e-Gel and others, usually in single-serving foil packets.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1996
You may think it is the sweetness of holiday treats that prompts you to shovel in the thousands of tongue-tickling calories that show up as extra padding by year's end. But recent studies of the human appetite show that while sugar may lead one into temptation, fat is what pushes the indulgence to caloric excess.Fat is the nutrient most commonly overconsumed and least likely to be compensated for by eating less at subsequent meals or by exercising the calories away. And while holiday treats like cookies, pies, cakes, eggnog and chocolates are certainly sweet, their main source of calories by far is fat."
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | January 24, 2003
SAN DIEGO - There have been many low points in quarterback Rich Gannon's NFL career, like being traded by New England because the Patriots wanted to make him a defensive back. He once lasted two-thirds of a season in Minnesota before he was benched without an explanation. Gannon played briefly in 1993 for Washington, but sat out 1994 with a shoulder injury. He once became a crowd favorite in Kansas City, but lost his job to Elvis Grbac, who was the favorite of coach Marty Schottenheimer.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2009
Angels Aemke of Wilmington, N.C., was seeking the recipe for the famous crab cakes that were served at Angelina's restaurant in Baltimore. She had a friend who used to send her these wonderful treats, but now that the venerable restaurant has closed (and was recently sold), she was hoping to find the recipe so that she could make the crab cakes at home. Jo Ann Nuetzel from Parkville sent in a recipe that was printed some years ago in The Sun and was reported to have come from the owner of Angelina's, the late Robert Reilly.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.