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By Kristy MacKaben and For The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
It was pretty much a given that Joe Vogelpohl's kids would love hiking. As a ranger at Patapsco Valley State Park, Vogelpohl spends most of his days on trails and often takes his children, Isaac, 4, and Cecelia, 1, along on weekends. Cecilia is usually strapped to Vogelpohl's back, while Isaac can hike four miles, walking most of the way and being carried every now and then. "We have done lots of hiking," says Vogelpohl, who lives in Sykesville. "I started them early. " He lets his children set their own pace and encourages exploration and detours along the way. Isaac often stops on the trail to skip rocks in the stream or look for bugs.
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NEWS
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 19, 1993
They call it imitation crab meat. You know, those chunks of white stuff with pink edges that you find in your supermarket's fish or meat case or made into "seafood" salad in the deli department.But about 10 years ago, when I first tried imitation crab, I called it "awful."I was attending a restaurant trade show in Chicago when producers introduced imitation crab meat made from surimi, a product developed by the Japanese a millennium ago.Surimi is Alaskan pollock (or a similar fish with good gelling properties)
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 31, 1991
Chocolate, chewing gum and red licorice are not as bad for your teeth as you thought.But the bad news: Bread, bananas, raisins, cereals and chips are probably worse, according to the latest dental research."
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
This time of year, people have weight loss on their minds. According to a 2012 survey published in the University of Scranton's Journal of Clinical Psychology, losing weight is the No. 1 New Year's resolution. For some Baltimore residents, working toward that goal by eating healthfully has gotten easier over the past year, thanks to the introduction of healthy snacks in their office or school vending machines. In December, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman signed an executive order banning the sale of high-sugar drinks in county buildings and at county-sponsored events; Baltimore City is exploring similar initiatives.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 2, 2004
I recently visited a friend in Los Angeles who's really into the Bar Method. Are there studios around here where I can take classes? The Bar Method, a sort of Pilates-ballet combination, is a trend that has caught on in cities from San Francisco to Greenwich, Conn. Like yoga and Pilates, the Bar Method is great for both flexibility and strength. Many of the exercises are done on a ballet barre, hence the name. While we don't know of any classes in Baltimore yet, they're sure to appear soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Marylanders love their crabs — especially when the meat is picked and mixed with cream, cheese, mayo and Old Bay. And while crabs are generally not an unhealthy choice right out of the shell, one serving of a crab dish can pack a third or more of the total recommended daily intake of fat, sodium and calories once the meat is drowned in fatty oils and salt. Area waters in which they are harvested can also mean pollutants. As with any treat, nutritionists say, moderation is key. And when consumers do indulge, an obvious choice is the broiled crab cake that isn't doused in tartar sauce or other goopy toppings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2010
Saundra Byrd from Brooklyn, Md., was looking for a recipe for peanut-butter fudge. She said the fudge was served in Baltimore County school cafeterias in the 1960s and '70s. Barbara Whitman of Glyndon sent in a recipe for peanut-butter fudge that she obtained when she was a teacher at Franklin Junior High School in the early 1970s. I'm fairly confident that fudge as luscious and rich as this, even with peanut butter as a main ingredient, would not be found in a school cafeteria these days.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
FEATURES
February 20, 1994
The Howard County Arts Council presented its 1993 Outstanding Artist Award to Ellen Kennedy, one of the founders of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, and its 1993 Outstanding Arts Educator Award to Valerie Costantini, chair, performing arts division at Howard Community College.*Johns Hopkins University biophysicist Ernesto Freire has been awarded a $110,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson to study themolecular forces that control how blood clots.*Saul Roseman, a biology professor at Johns Hopkins University who has spend more than 40 years in research on complexcarbohydrates, has received the 1993 Karl Meyer Award for his work.
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