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By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 10, 2005
Around this time of year, I start getting phone calls and e-mails asking for holiday entertaining advice. A cousin in North Carolina who is planning a large open house put in one such plea. A few days later a friend in Ohio solicited ideas for something special. At the finish of my holiday cooking classes, students line up for recipe counseling. This flurry of questions isn't surprising, because in the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve we open our homes more often than during any other period of the year.
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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | July 2, 1991
People whose voices are vital to their professions -- including singers, teachers, politicians, broadcasters and actors -- can injure their voices, just as athletes can injure their muscles.When athletes are injured, they should stop participating in the sport that caused the injury. They should return to that sport only when they can exercise without pain.Similarly, voice professionals should rest their injured throat tissue by not talking or singing for a few days. Ideally, they should be able to whisper.
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By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | January 5, 2009
I foolishly picked up a plastic honey bear that was in a pot of boiling water, and the honey squirted out all over the palm of my hand. Immediately, I ran it under cold water, and then I ran to get your book because I knew there was something I could put on burns that was natural: mustard. I had mustard in the fridge, and I poured it all over the palm of my hand. It still burned like the devil, but I left it on while I read more. I put more mustard on, wrapped gauze bandage around it and left it on for a while until the pain subsided.
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By Kate McNaboe and Kate McNaboe,katherine.mcnaboe@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
There's nothing wrong with vanilla ice cream or a vanilla-and-chocolate frozen-yogurt cone. But sometimes you just want something different, something more. Some shops in the Baltimore area have taken that idea to a whole new level, offering frozen treats in wacky flavors or spicing things up, sometimes literally, with out-there toppings. Some of the craziest cold concoctions: Dominion's vegetable ice cream, which comes in spinach, carrot, tomato, sweet potato and jalapeno; Mr. Yogato's peach yogurt with extra-virgin olive oil and balsamic vinaigrette; Pitango Gelato's spicy chocolate, with crushed red chili peppers; Moxley's Old Bay ice cream, for that extra little kick; and Sylvan Beach's margarita ice cream, complete with salt and lime.
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By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | October 10, 1993
SALISBURY -- What began five years ago as a 100-mile training ride for serious cyclists unexpectedly drew some 3,500 riders from 24 states and Canada yesterday -- and experienced its first fatality.A 52-year-old cyclist from Severn died of multiple head injuries after apparently pedaling past a stop sign and striking the side of a moving Ford Explorer on a rural road west of the Salisbury-Wicomico County Regional Airport, police said.State police said Charles F. MacDonald Jr. died after the accident at Mount Hermon Church and Ward roads shortly before noon as he rode on the last leg of the tour.
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By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
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February 20, 1994
The Howard County Arts Council presented its 1993 Outstanding Artist Award to Ellen Kennedy, one of the founders of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, and its 1993 Outstanding Arts Educator Award to Valerie Costantini, chair, performing arts division at Howard Community College.*Johns Hopkins University biophysicist Ernesto Freire has been awarded a $110,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson to study themolecular forces that control how blood clots.*Saul Roseman, a biology professor at Johns Hopkins University who has spend more than 40 years in research on complexcarbohydrates, has received the 1993 Karl Meyer Award for his work.
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By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
The simple act of trying to keep dentures in place can trigger serious health problems, including neurological damage, a new study by University of Maryland researchers warns. Preliminary studies link the zinc in some adhesives to neurological damage and blood abnormalities, at least among patients who squeeze out too much denture cream, too often, trying to keep their teeth anchored. A review of the scientific literature by faculty members at the University of Maryland Dental School has concluded that these health risks "should be a matter of concern for all dentists caring for denture patients.
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By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
Something's always cooking at Wilkins-Rogers Inc. The owners of the last flour mill in Ellicott City used to be known locally for the test-batch doughnuts it would sell cheaply. Today, employees are cooking up glazes, batters, dry mixes and marinades for corporate customers looking to bring a new kick to chicken wings, waffles and doughnuts. With a new headquarters and mill in Halethorpe - the Ellicott City location is strictly a mill now - the 90-year-old maker of Washington flour, Raga Muffins and Indian Head cornmeal brands is staking its future on flour with flavor.
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