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By ROB KASPER | July 29, 2009
Brian Roberts finds working in the kitchen relaxing. Gregg Zaun likes the challenge of cooking for large groups. And for Jeremy Guthrie, cooking reminds him of his years in Spain. These Orioles, who make their living on the baseball field, told me that from time to time they like to kick back in the kitchen. Yesterday, they were set to display some of their culinary prowess at an Orioles Cook-Off held at the ESPN Zone restaurant in downtown Baltimore to benefit the Maryland Food Bank.
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FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 10, 2005
Around this time of year, I start getting phone calls and e-mails asking for holiday entertaining advice. A cousin in North Carolina who is planning a large open house put in one such plea. A few days later a friend in Ohio solicited ideas for something special. At the finish of my holiday cooking classes, students line up for recipe counseling. This flurry of questions isn't surprising, because in the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve we open our homes more often than during any other period of the year.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
FEATURES
February 20, 1994
The Howard County Arts Council presented its 1993 Outstanding Artist Award to Ellen Kennedy, one of the founders of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, and its 1993 Outstanding Arts Educator Award to Valerie Costantini, chair, performing arts division at Howard Community College.*Johns Hopkins University biophysicist Ernesto Freire has been awarded a $110,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson to study themolecular forces that control how blood clots.*Saul Roseman, a biology professor at Johns Hopkins University who has spend more than 40 years in research on complexcarbohydrates, has received the 1993 Karl Meyer Award for his work.
NEWS
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 19, 1993
They call it imitation crab meat. You know, those chunks of white stuff with pink edges that you find in your supermarket's fish or meat case or made into "seafood" salad in the deli department.But about 10 years ago, when I first tried imitation crab, I called it "awful."I was attending a restaurant trade show in Chicago when producers introduced imitation crab meat made from surimi, a product developed by the Japanese a millennium ago.Surimi is Alaskan pollock (or a similar fish with good gelling properties)
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 2, 2004
I recently visited a friend in Los Angeles who's really into the Bar Method. Are there studios around here where I can take classes? The Bar Method, a sort of Pilates-ballet combination, is a trend that has caught on in cities from San Francisco to Greenwich, Conn. Like yoga and Pilates, the Bar Method is great for both flexibility and strength. Many of the exercises are done on a ballet barre, hence the name. While we don't know of any classes in Baltimore yet, they're sure to appear soon.
FEATURES
By TINA DANZE and TINA DANZE,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 9, 1999
Move over, pasta. There's a new ingredient for quick-fix, Italian-inspired meals. Now polenta also solves the what's-for-dinner quandary when time is short. Not polenta made from scratch, of course -- that would require laborious stove-top cooking. It's precooked polenta that woos weeknight cooks with "heat-and-serve" convenience.You may have noticed ready-made polenta at the supermarket. In its clear plastic packaging, it resembles a fat, golden sausage -- not exactly something that screams dinner.
FEATURES
March 27, 1991
Easy cheese and pasta is low in fat, high in carbohydrates, and provides important nutrients, including protein. The dish takes about 10 minutes to prepare.Cook fun-shaped pasta like wagon wheels or rotelle. Add frozen peas and corn kernels during the last minute of cooking time. Drain and toss with shredded Cheddar cheese until it melts. Add cherry tomatoes and prepared salsa.Easy Cheese and Pasta8 ounces (3 1/4 cups) wagon wheel or rotelle pasta1 cup frozen peas1 cup frozen corn kernels4 ounces (about 1 cup)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2010
Anne Loy from Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for making a baked tomato dish that used brown sugar to make it somewhat sweet. Now that the summer crop of tomatoes is here in all its glory, this seemed like an ideal time to explore some recipes for this classic Southern-style side dish. Phyllis Taylor from Middle River sent in four different versions of sweet baked tomatoes, which she said came from a cookbook her family self-published several years ago for a family reunion.
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