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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
Biochemist Michael W. Washabaugh may yet decode secrets of how human diet affects health, but the young scholar's academic reputation has been crushed. Never again will he pursue his theories at the Johns Hopkins University or, in all likelihood, at any other major research university.Graduate students whom he had trained accused the former Hopkins associate professor of supporting his theories by exaggerating the strength of evidence he gathered on a federally financed project.During a methodical, six-week inquiry last fall, an investigative panel of Hopkins' School of Hygiene and Public Health picked apart Washabaugh's explanations and said he had repeatedly misrepresented data.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | July 2, 1991
People whose voices are vital to their professions -- including singers, teachers, politicians, broadcasters and actors -- can injure their voices, just as athletes can injure their muscles.When athletes are injured, they should stop participating in the sport that caused the injury. They should return to that sport only when they can exercise without pain.Similarly, voice professionals should rest their injured throat tissue by not talking or singing for a few days. Ideally, they should be able to whisper.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2011
Molly Shattuck might have hung up her cheerleading pompoms, but she's still got game. The oldest cheerleader in NFL history when she made the Ravens' squad in 2005, Shattuck, now 44, remains in age-defying shape and immersed in venture premised on taut abs and high kicks. She has just launched a website and video devoted to exercise and other healthful habits, called Molly Shattuck Vibrant Living. "I want to show the exercises and routines that have worked for me, but it's so much more than that," said Shattuck, who also offers advice on healthful eating and drinking at mollyshattuck.com.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | October 10, 1993
SALISBURY -- What began five years ago as a 100-mile training ride for serious cyclists unexpectedly drew some 3,500 riders from 24 states and Canada yesterday -- and experienced its first fatality.A 52-year-old cyclist from Severn died of multiple head injuries after apparently pedaling past a stop sign and striking the side of a moving Ford Explorer on a rural road west of the Salisbury-Wicomico County Regional Airport, police said.State police said Charles F. MacDonald Jr. died after the accident at Mount Hermon Church and Ward roads shortly before noon as he rode on the last leg of the tour.
FEATURES
By Charles Perry, and Charles Perry,,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 1999
In the '60s, foodies discovered phyllo. In the '70s, they started to get a little tired of it.Understandably. They'd made pan after pan of baklava and spanakopita. They invented all sorts of flaky brie balls and cunning hors d'oeuvre cups in their quest to take phyllo to the limit.So when California cuisine exploded onto the scene in the '80s, phyllo was ungraciously ignored, like the guest who shows up at the party a couple of hours before the crowd. But foodies actually had gotten nowhere near the end of its possibilities.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | August 3, 1994
It's no secret. I frequently use store-bought frozen bread dough in my recipes.Why not? It gives the impression that I've spent a lot of time in the kitchen -- creating dishes that look labor-intensive but really aren't. Besides, "fresh" bread dough tastes and smells terrific.So three years ago, when I spotted the story in Sunset magazine about grilled breads that used flattened disks of prepared bread dough, I fired up the barbecue and gave the concept a culinary whirl.The results were received with unanimous approval.
FEATURES
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 20, 1992
In the '50s, those of us trying to emulate June Cleaver wer wrapping up pigs in blankets to serve with martinis at cocktail hour.In the '60s, we went a little more "gourmet" by shaping Swedish meatballs.The '70s had us worshiping nouvelle cuisine, French chefs, salmon mousse and miniature quiches.In the '80s, we munched our way through regional/ethnic tidbits such as sushi, blackened chicken, empanadas and quesadillas.Hors d'oeuvres. Over the years, our thinking about these tasty tidbits clearly has changed.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 10, 2005
Around this time of year, I start getting phone calls and e-mails asking for holiday entertaining advice. A cousin in North Carolina who is planning a large open house put in one such plea. A few days later a friend in Ohio solicited ideas for something special. At the finish of my holiday cooking classes, students line up for recipe counseling. This flurry of questions isn't surprising, because in the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve we open our homes more often than during any other period of the year.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
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