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By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 10, 2005
Around this time of year, I start getting phone calls and e-mails asking for holiday entertaining advice. A cousin in North Carolina who is planning a large open house put in one such plea. A few days later a friend in Ohio solicited ideas for something special. At the finish of my holiday cooking classes, students line up for recipe counseling. This flurry of questions isn't surprising, because in the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve we open our homes more often than during any other period of the year.
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By Kristy MacKaben and For The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
It was pretty much a given that Joe Vogelpohl's kids would love hiking. As a ranger at Patapsco Valley State Park, Vogelpohl spends most of his days on trails and often takes his children, Isaac, 4, and Cecelia, 1, along on weekends. Cecilia is usually strapped to Vogelpohl's back, while Isaac can hike four miles, walking most of the way and being carried every now and then. "We have done lots of hiking," says Vogelpohl, who lives in Sykesville. "I started them early. " He lets his children set their own pace and encourages exploration and detours along the way. Isaac often stops on the trail to skip rocks in the stream or look for bugs.
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By TINA DANZE and TINA DANZE,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 9, 1999
Move over, pasta. There's a new ingredient for quick-fix, Italian-inspired meals. Now polenta also solves the what's-for-dinner quandary when time is short. Not polenta made from scratch, of course -- that would require laborious stove-top cooking. It's precooked polenta that woos weeknight cooks with "heat-and-serve" convenience.You may have noticed ready-made polenta at the supermarket. In its clear plastic packaging, it resembles a fat, golden sausage -- not exactly something that screams dinner.
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By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2010
Lorraine Engel of Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe that was in her family for generations but has been misplaced - one for a hot milk cake. Rosemary Kingsley of Olney sent in her recipe for this simple, old-fashioned classic. She said this is her go-to cake for most family celebrations. It is extremely adaptable, perfectly delicious served plain or dressed up with fresh berries or just about any type of frosting or glaze you can come up with. It can be baked in almost any shape pan: round, rectangular, tube or bundt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2010
Saundra Byrd from Brooklyn, Md., was looking for a recipe for peanut-butter fudge. She said the fudge was served in Baltimore County school cafeterias in the 1960s and '70s. Barbara Whitman of Glyndon sent in a recipe for peanut-butter fudge that she obtained when she was a teacher at Franklin Junior High School in the early 1970s. I'm fairly confident that fudge as luscious and rich as this, even with peanut butter as a main ingredient, would not be found in a school cafeteria these days.
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By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
Betty Eichelberger from Frackville, Pa., said that several years ago A.1. steak sauce had a recipe for meatloaf on its bottle. Unfortunately, she has misplaced the recipe and was hoping someone might have it. Ruth Hesseltine of Iowa City, Iowa, sent in a copy of a recipe card that more than likely was clipped from an advertisement from the sauce's manufacturer. The card says "A.1. recipe secret for meatloaf … just add 4 tablespoons of A.1. steak sauce to make any meatloaf recipe taste even better.
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By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | January 5, 2009
I foolishly picked up a plastic honey bear that was in a pot of boiling water, and the honey squirted out all over the palm of my hand. Immediately, I ran it under cold water, and then I ran to get your book because I knew there was something I could put on burns that was natural: mustard. I had mustard in the fridge, and I poured it all over the palm of my hand. It still burned like the devil, but I left it on while I read more. I put more mustard on, wrapped gauze bandage around it and left it on for a while until the pain subsided.
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By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
Something's always cooking at Wilkins-Rogers Inc. The owners of the last flour mill in Ellicott City used to be known locally for the test-batch doughnuts it would sell cheaply. Today, employees are cooking up glazes, batters, dry mixes and marinades for corporate customers looking to bring a new kick to chicken wings, waffles and doughnuts. With a new headquarters and mill in Halethorpe - the Ellicott City location is strictly a mill now - the 90-year-old maker of Washington flour, Raga Muffins and Indian Head cornmeal brands is staking its future on flour with flavor.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
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By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
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