Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCarbohydrates
IN THE NEWS

Carbohydrates

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2010
Lorraine Engel of Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe that was in her family for generations but has been misplaced - one for a hot milk cake. Rosemary Kingsley of Olney sent in her recipe for this simple, old-fashioned classic. She said this is her go-to cake for most family celebrations. It is extremely adaptable, perfectly delicious served plain or dressed up with fresh berries or just about any type of frosting or glaze you can come up with. It can be baked in almost any shape pan: round, rectangular, tube or bundt.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | July 2, 1991
People whose voices are vital to their professions -- including singers, teachers, politicians, broadcasters and actors -- can injure their voices, just as athletes can injure their muscles.When athletes are injured, they should stop participating in the sport that caused the injury. They should return to that sport only when they can exercise without pain.Similarly, voice professionals should rest their injured throat tissue by not talking or singing for a few days. Ideally, they should be able to whisper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2010
Saundra Byrd from Brooklyn, Md., was looking for a recipe for peanut-butter fudge. She said the fudge was served in Baltimore County school cafeterias in the 1960s and '70s. Barbara Whitman of Glyndon sent in a recipe for peanut-butter fudge that she obtained when she was a teacher at Franklin Junior High School in the early 1970s. I'm fairly confident that fudge as luscious and rich as this, even with peanut butter as a main ingredient, would not be found in a school cafeteria these days.
FEATURES
By TINA DANZE and TINA DANZE,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 9, 1999
Move over, pasta. There's a new ingredient for quick-fix, Italian-inspired meals. Now polenta also solves the what's-for-dinner quandary when time is short. Not polenta made from scratch, of course -- that would require laborious stove-top cooking. It's precooked polenta that woos weeknight cooks with "heat-and-serve" convenience.You may have noticed ready-made polenta at the supermarket. In its clear plastic packaging, it resembles a fat, golden sausage -- not exactly something that screams dinner.
NEWS
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 19, 1993
They call it imitation crab meat. You know, those chunks of white stuff with pink edges that you find in your supermarket's fish or meat case or made into "seafood" salad in the deli department.But about 10 years ago, when I first tried imitation crab, I called it "awful."I was attending a restaurant trade show in Chicago when producers introduced imitation crab meat made from surimi, a product developed by the Japanese a millennium ago.Surimi is Alaskan pollock (or a similar fish with good gelling properties)
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 31, 1991
Chocolate, chewing gum and red licorice are not as bad for your teeth as you thought.But the bad news: Bread, bananas, raisins, cereals and chips are probably worse, according to the latest dental research."
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | November 29, 1994
Something strange is happening to bagels. So strange, in fact, that when a client I'm counseling says, "All I had for breakfast was a bagel, and it held me till lunch," I start asking a lot of questions.Where did you buy it? What brand was it? How big was it? What kind was it? What did you put on it? The answers to those questions shed light on its nutritional quality and explain how it's working for you in your overall healthy eating plan.In its most primitive form, a bagel is a very simple, nearly fat-free yeast bread that fits comfortably in even the strictest diets.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
This time of year, people have weight loss on their minds. According to a 2012 survey published in the University of Scranton's Journal of Clinical Psychology, losing weight is the No. 1 New Year's resolution. For some Baltimore residents, working toward that goal by eating healthfully has gotten easier over the past year, thanks to the introduction of healthy snacks in their office or school vending machines. In December, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman signed an executive order banning the sale of high-sugar drinks in county buildings and at county-sponsored events; Baltimore City is exploring similar initiatives.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Jimmy Smith knew it was real the first time he walked up the big hill to football practice, his 18-year-old lungs unable to find enough air. In the years that followed, the images of husky linemen, gasping on the sidelines, only confirmed the potency of Colorado's thin, Rocky Mountain air. The Ravens cornerback played at the University of Colorado in Boulder, which sits about a mile above sea level. That's almost exactly the same elevation he and his teammates will encounter at Denver's Sports Authority Field on Saturday when they try to keep their season alive in an AFC divisional-round playoff game against the top-seeded Broncos.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.