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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2010
Saundra Byrd from Brooklyn, Md., was looking for a recipe for peanut-butter fudge. She said the fudge was served in Baltimore County school cafeterias in the 1960s and '70s. Barbara Whitman of Glyndon sent in a recipe for peanut-butter fudge that she obtained when she was a teacher at Franklin Junior High School in the early 1970s. I'm fairly confident that fudge as luscious and rich as this, even with peanut butter as a main ingredient, would not be found in a school cafeteria these days.
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NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | January 5, 2009
I foolishly picked up a plastic honey bear that was in a pot of boiling water, and the honey squirted out all over the palm of my hand. Immediately, I ran it under cold water, and then I ran to get your book because I knew there was something I could put on burns that was natural: mustard. I had mustard in the fridge, and I poured it all over the palm of my hand. It still burned like the devil, but I left it on while I read more. I put more mustard on, wrapped gauze bandage around it and left it on for a while until the pain subsided.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | January 20, 2010
I t was love at first bite. I went to Philadelphia to eat cheesesteaks, but instead fell for the Italian roast pork. It happened at Tony Luke's, a South Philadelphia stronghold of sandwiches. There are two Tony Luke's eateries; both of them sit on the first block of E. Oregon Ave. There are also two men named Tony Luke. There is Tony Luke Sr., who presides over the sit-down restaurant, a sports bar that opened 10 years ago. Then there is Tony Luke Jr., who with his brother, Nick, runs the less decorous carryout joint across the street.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 31, 1991
Chocolate, chewing gum and red licorice are not as bad for your teeth as you thought.But the bad news: Bread, bananas, raisins, cereals and chips are probably worse, according to the latest dental research."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2011
Bonnie Conrad from Pasadena was searching for an old recipe called "Country Kitchen Pie. " She said the recipe was on the back of a box of Minute Rice during the 1960s and had ground beef as the crust and rice and cheese as the filling. This must have been a very popular recipe back in the day because several readers still had it in their files. Helen O'Connor of Knoxville, Tenn., sent in a copy of her "well-used and loved" recipe for the pie that she cut out of a magazine ad for Hunt's tomato sauce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2010
Joanne Johnson from Fort Bragg, Calif., was looking for a recipe for an apple kuchen. Her grandmother used to make this and, unfortunately, Johnson failed to get her recipe before she passed away. She said she has found and tried several recipes for apple kuchen but has had little success re-creating one she liked as well as her grandmother's. Most recipes for traditional apple kuchen are rather time-consuming and involve mastering sweet yeast dough. Andrienne Greatorex from Winchester, Va., sent in a recipe for an apple kuchen which appears to have come from the back of a Betty Crocker cake mix. The recipe uses a yellow cake mix for the dough in place of a yeast dough.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
FEATURES
February 20, 1994
The Howard County Arts Council presented its 1993 Outstanding Artist Award to Ellen Kennedy, one of the founders of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, and its 1993 Outstanding Arts Educator Award to Valerie Costantini, chair, performing arts division at Howard Community College.*Johns Hopkins University biophysicist Ernesto Freire has been awarded a $110,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson to study themolecular forces that control how blood clots.*Saul Roseman, a biology professor at Johns Hopkins University who has spend more than 40 years in research on complexcarbohydrates, has received the 1993 Karl Meyer Award for his work.
NEWS
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 19, 1993
They call it imitation crab meat. You know, those chunks of white stuff with pink edges that you find in your supermarket's fish or meat case or made into "seafood" salad in the deli department.But about 10 years ago, when I first tried imitation crab, I called it "awful."I was attending a restaurant trade show in Chicago when producers introduced imitation crab meat made from surimi, a product developed by the Japanese a millennium ago.Surimi is Alaskan pollock (or a similar fish with good gelling properties)
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