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By Charles Perry, and Charles Perry,,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 1999
In the '60s, foodies discovered phyllo. In the '70s, they started to get a little tired of it.Understandably. They'd made pan after pan of baklava and spanakopita. They invented all sorts of flaky brie balls and cunning hors d'oeuvre cups in their quest to take phyllo to the limit.So when California cuisine exploded onto the scene in the '80s, phyllo was ungraciously ignored, like the guest who shows up at the party a couple of hours before the crowd. But foodies actually had gotten nowhere near the end of its possibilities.
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NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 31, 1991
Chocolate, chewing gum and red licorice are not as bad for your teeth as you thought.But the bad news: Bread, bananas, raisins, cereals and chips are probably worse, according to the latest dental research."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
FEATURES
February 20, 1994
The Howard County Arts Council presented its 1993 Outstanding Artist Award to Ellen Kennedy, one of the founders of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, and its 1993 Outstanding Arts Educator Award to Valerie Costantini, chair, performing arts division at Howard Community College.*Johns Hopkins University biophysicist Ernesto Freire has been awarded a $110,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson to study themolecular forces that control how blood clots.*Saul Roseman, a biology professor at Johns Hopkins University who has spend more than 40 years in research on complexcarbohydrates, has received the 1993 Karl Meyer Award for his work.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2010
Lorraine Engel of Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe that was in her family for generations but has been misplaced - one for a hot milk cake. Rosemary Kingsley of Olney sent in her recipe for this simple, old-fashioned classic. She said this is her go-to cake for most family celebrations. It is extremely adaptable, perfectly delicious served plain or dressed up with fresh berries or just about any type of frosting or glaze you can come up with. It can be baked in almost any shape pan: round, rectangular, tube or bundt.
FEATURES
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | August 20, 1997
There is a dish that I have enjoyed preparing and serving for many years called orzo pasta with fresh dill and feta cheese. It's one of my favorites not only because of its taste and appearance, but also because it's so flexible.It can be served hot from the skillet or chilled the next day. It's wonderful as a stuffing for eggplants and zucchini. You may want to use some of it in a frittata the next day. I mix it into scrambled eggs in a skillet for a warming breakfast.You should use pearl-shaped orzo pasta for this recipe because of its comforting, chewy texture and ability to absorb the clean flavors of the lemon, dill and extra virgin olive oil. If you can't find it, try acini de pepe shaped pasta, which translates into "little peppercorns" -- they look like tiny cylinders.
FEATURES
By Emily Sohn and Emily Sohn,Los Angeles Times | July 5, 2007
A triple nonfat mocha may taste good, but it's likely the jolt that drives millions of people to fork over three bucks or more for the steaming cup of liquid. Between 80 percent and 90 percent of North Americans consume caffeine regularly, according to a 2004 review, with an average daily consumption equal to about two mugs of coffee or four 16-ounce bottles of soda. The habit has become less guilt-inducing recently, with growing evidence that both coffee and tea can fight cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Parkinson's disease and more.
FEATURES
March 27, 1991
Easy cheese and pasta is low in fat, high in carbohydrates, and provides important nutrients, including protein. The dish takes about 10 minutes to prepare.Cook fun-shaped pasta like wagon wheels or rotelle. Add frozen peas and corn kernels during the last minute of cooking time. Drain and toss with shredded Cheddar cheese until it melts. Add cherry tomatoes and prepared salsa.Easy Cheese and Pasta8 ounces (3 1/4 cups) wagon wheel or rotelle pasta1 cup frozen peas1 cup frozen corn kernels4 ounces (about 1 cup)
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 24, 2012
Giant Food of Landover is using new labels to help shoppers identify gluten-free foods. The blue and green signs will be used to mark nearly 3,000 products sold by the region's largest grocery chain. About three million Americans have to eat a gluten-free diet because of Celiac disease, an immune disorder in which gluten damages the lining of the small intestine. Others have adopted thegluten-free dietfor other personal or dietary reasons. Gluten is a protein found in carbohydrates including wheat, barley and rye. Gluten can also be used as an additive in items such as soy sauce and licori   “    
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