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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | July 2, 1991
People whose voices are vital to their professions -- including singers, teachers, politicians, broadcasters and actors -- can injure their voices, just as athletes can injure their muscles.When athletes are injured, they should stop participating in the sport that caused the injury. They should return to that sport only when they can exercise without pain.Similarly, voice professionals should rest their injured throat tissue by not talking or singing for a few days. Ideally, they should be able to whisper.
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HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | November 29, 1994
Something strange is happening to bagels. So strange, in fact, that when a client I'm counseling says, "All I had for breakfast was a bagel, and it held me till lunch," I start asking a lot of questions.Where did you buy it? What brand was it? How big was it? What kind was it? What did you put on it? The answers to those questions shed light on its nutritional quality and explain how it's working for you in your overall healthy eating plan.In its most primitive form, a bagel is a very simple, nearly fat-free yeast bread that fits comfortably in even the strictest diets.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
This time of year, people have weight loss on their minds. According to a 2012 survey published in the University of Scranton's Journal of Clinical Psychology, losing weight is the No. 1 New Year's resolution. For some Baltimore residents, working toward that goal by eating healthfully has gotten easier over the past year, thanks to the introduction of healthy snacks in their office or school vending machines. In December, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman signed an executive order banning the sale of high-sugar drinks in county buildings and at county-sponsored events; Baltimore City is exploring similar initiatives.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 10, 2005
Around this time of year, I start getting phone calls and e-mails asking for holiday entertaining advice. A cousin in North Carolina who is planning a large open house put in one such plea. A few days later a friend in Ohio solicited ideas for something special. At the finish of my holiday cooking classes, students line up for recipe counseling. This flurry of questions isn't surprising, because in the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve we open our homes more often than during any other period of the year.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 24, 2005
Menu Roasted Fish With Guacamole, couscous scented with saffron, pan-fried zucchini with garlic, plum sundaes My husband, a college professor who loves to entertain, is always suggesting we invite people over for dinner. "Just keep it simple," he advises. Recently, he unexpectedly proposed that we ask two students for a meal. I was hesitant, but then it came to me: I could anchor the meal with an easy fish dish I had made several times before. It takes only a few minutes to assemble and needs a short time in a hot oven.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
Betty Eichelberger from Frackville, Pa., said that several years ago A.1. steak sauce had a recipe for meatloaf on its bottle. Unfortunately, she has misplaced the recipe and was hoping someone might have it. Ruth Hesseltine of Iowa City, Iowa, sent in a copy of a recipe card that more than likely was clipped from an advertisement from the sauce's manufacturer. The card says "A.1. recipe secret for meatloaf … just add 4 tablespoons of A.1. steak sauce to make any meatloaf recipe taste even better.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | January 5, 2009
I foolishly picked up a plastic honey bear that was in a pot of boiling water, and the honey squirted out all over the palm of my hand. Immediately, I ran it under cold water, and then I ran to get your book because I knew there was something I could put on burns that was natural: mustard. I had mustard in the fridge, and I poured it all over the palm of my hand. It still burned like the devil, but I left it on while I read more. I put more mustard on, wrapped gauze bandage around it and left it on for a while until the pain subsided.
NEWS
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 19, 1993
They call it imitation crab meat. You know, those chunks of white stuff with pink edges that you find in your supermarket's fish or meat case or made into "seafood" salad in the deli department.But about 10 years ago, when I first tried imitation crab, I called it "awful."I was attending a restaurant trade show in Chicago when producers introduced imitation crab meat made from surimi, a product developed by the Japanese a millennium ago.Surimi is Alaskan pollock (or a similar fish with good gelling properties)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2009
Angels Aemke of Wilmington, N.C., was seeking the recipe for the famous crab cakes that were served at Angelina's restaurant in Baltimore. She had a friend who used to send her these wonderful treats, but now that the venerable restaurant has closed (and was recently sold), she was hoping to find the recipe so that she could make the crab cakes at home. Jo Ann Nuetzel from Parkville sent in a recipe that was printed some years ago in The Sun and was reported to have come from the owner of Angelina's, the late Robert Reilly.
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