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By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | August 20, 1997
There is a dish that I have enjoyed preparing and serving for many years called orzo pasta with fresh dill and feta cheese. It's one of my favorites not only because of its taste and appearance, but also because it's so flexible.It can be served hot from the skillet or chilled the next day. It's wonderful as a stuffing for eggplants and zucchini. You may want to use some of it in a frittata the next day. I mix it into scrambled eggs in a skillet for a warming breakfast.You should use pearl-shaped orzo pasta for this recipe because of its comforting, chewy texture and ability to absorb the clean flavors of the lemon, dill and extra virgin olive oil. If you can't find it, try acini de pepe shaped pasta, which translates into "little peppercorns" -- they look like tiny cylinders.
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March 27, 1991
Easy cheese and pasta is low in fat, high in carbohydrates, and provides important nutrients, including protein. The dish takes about 10 minutes to prepare.Cook fun-shaped pasta like wagon wheels or rotelle. Add frozen peas and corn kernels during the last minute of cooking time. Drain and toss with shredded Cheddar cheese until it melts. Add cherry tomatoes and prepared salsa.Easy Cheese and Pasta8 ounces (3 1/4 cups) wagon wheel or rotelle pasta1 cup frozen peas1 cup frozen corn kernels4 ounces (about 1 cup)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | July 29, 2009
Brian Roberts finds working in the kitchen relaxing. Gregg Zaun likes the challenge of cooking for large groups. And for Jeremy Guthrie, cooking reminds him of his years in Spain. These Orioles, who make their living on the baseball field, told me that from time to time they like to kick back in the kitchen. Yesterday, they were set to display some of their culinary prowess at an Orioles Cook-Off held at the ESPN Zone restaurant in downtown Baltimore to benefit the Maryland Food Bank.
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By Judith Blake and Judith Blake,SEATTLE TIMES Knight-Ridder News Service | June 30, 1996
When you're looking for interesting ways to cook vegetables, think roasting. You'll have tasteful company. Oven-roasted vegetables are turning up on many restaurant menus and in cookbooks that dote on veggies."
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By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1996
You may think it is the sweetness of holiday treats that prompts you to shovel in the thousands of tongue-tickling calories that show up as extra padding by year's end. But recent studies of the human appetite show that while sugar may lead one into temptation, fat is what pushes the indulgence to caloric excess.Fat is the nutrient most commonly overconsumed and least likely to be compensated for by eating less at subsequent meals or by exercising the calories away. And while holiday treats like cookies, pies, cakes, eggnog and chocolates are certainly sweet, their main source of calories by far is fat."
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By Joanne E. Morvay | July 18, 2001
Item: Pepperidge Farm French Toast What you get: 6 slices Cost: About $2.75 Nutritional content: Cinnamon flavor -- 200 calories, 7 grams fat, 1.5 grams saturated fat, 210 milligrams sodium, 27 grams carbohydrates, 9 grams sugars Preparation time: 1 or 2 cycles in toaster, 1 to 1 1/2 minutes in microwave, 6 minutes in oven Review: Want French toast but don't have time to heat up the griddle? Try these frozen slices from Pepperidge Farm. They're quickly heated in the toaster or oven.
FEATURES
October 30, 1991
This recipe cuts fat and calories but still tastes great. It was adapted from "Harriet Roth's Cholesterol Control Cookbook."Scalloped Potatoes2 teaspoons olive oil1 onion, halved and thinly sliced1 large clove garlic, minced3 large white potatoes, peeled and sliced 1/4 -inch thick1/4 teaspoon dried thyme, crushedSalt and pepper to taste1 cup low-sodium chicken broth1 tablespoon Parmesan cheeseIn nonstick skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and garlic; saute until softened, about five to 10 minutes.
NEWS
November 28, 2007
J. ROBERT CADE, 80 Creator of Gatorade Dr. J. Robert Cade, who created the sports drink Gatorade and launched an industry that the beverage continues to dominate, died yesterday in Jacksonville, Fla., of kidney failure. His death was announced by the University of Florida, where he and other researchers created Gatorade in 1965 to help the school's football players replace carbohydrates and electrolytes. Now sold in 80 countries in dozens of flavors, Gatorade was born thanks to a question from then-Gators Coach Dwayne Douglas about why players don't urinate after games, Dr. Cade said in a 2005 interview with the Associated Press.
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By Darryl Campagna and Darryl Campagna,ALBANY TIMES UNION | December 23, 1997
ALBANY, N.Y. -- In "Troilus and Cressida," Shakespeare wrote: "Alas the day, how loath you are to offend daylight!"Shakespeare wasn't writing about seasonal affective disorder when he penned that line for his character Pandarus, but his words have a contemporary resonance for the millions of people who struggle through the winter doldrums.Sometimes scoffingly dismissed by the uninformed as a made-up disease, a real case of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is no laughing matter, said Dr. Robin Tassinari, a professor of and clinical medicine at Albany Medical College.
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By Joanne E. Morvay | August 15, 2001
Item: StarKist Tuna in the No Drain Package What you get: 3 two-ounce servings Cost: About $2.25 Nutritional content: Premium Chunk White Albacore in water - 70 calories, 1 gram fat, 0 grams saturated fat, 250 milligrams sodium, 0 grams carbohydrates, 0 grams sugars Preparation time: Tear open package and use Review: Can you improve a product just by improving its packaging? Well, this StarKist Tuna in the No Drain Package sure tastes better to me. Maybe I'm just taken in by how neat and easy it is to use. There's no can to open, no water to drain off. The tuna inside is firm, not mealy like some canned tuna.
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