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February 20, 1994
The Howard County Arts Council presented its 1993 Outstanding Artist Award to Ellen Kennedy, one of the founders of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, and its 1993 Outstanding Arts Educator Award to Valerie Costantini, chair, performing arts division at Howard Community College.*Johns Hopkins University biophysicist Ernesto Freire has been awarded a $110,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson to study themolecular forces that control how blood clots.*Saul Roseman, a biology professor at Johns Hopkins University who has spend more than 40 years in research on complexcarbohydrates, has received the 1993 Karl Meyer Award for his work.
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FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
FEATURES
March 27, 1991
Easy cheese and pasta is low in fat, high in carbohydrates, and provides important nutrients, including protein. The dish takes about 10 minutes to prepare.Cook fun-shaped pasta like wagon wheels or rotelle. Add frozen peas and corn kernels during the last minute of cooking time. Drain and toss with shredded Cheddar cheese until it melts. Add cherry tomatoes and prepared salsa.Easy Cheese and Pasta8 ounces (3 1/4 cups) wagon wheel or rotelle pasta1 cup frozen peas1 cup frozen corn kernels4 ounces (about 1 cup)
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | January 21, 2007
The chill of a late summer night had fallen over California's Sierra Nevada range, and all Jim Lighthizer could do was pace. Here at 10,600 feet, the trees had thinned out and a full moon lit the canyon. But the splendor hardly registered. His steps took him back and forth in front of a two-man tent. On the floor lay his 28-year-old son, Conor, a diabetic whose condition worsened by the hour. What was he supposed to do? What the hell was he supposed to do? He could go for help or send his brother-in-law.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 2, 2004
I recently visited a friend in Los Angeles who's really into the Bar Method. Are there studios around here where I can take classes? The Bar Method, a sort of Pilates-ballet combination, is a trend that has caught on in cities from San Francisco to Greenwich, Conn. Like yoga and Pilates, the Bar Method is great for both flexibility and strength. Many of the exercises are done on a ballet barre, hence the name. While we don't know of any classes in Baltimore yet, they're sure to appear soon.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 31, 1991
Chocolate, chewing gum and red licorice are not as bad for your teeth as you thought.But the bad news: Bread, bananas, raisins, cereals and chips are probably worse, according to the latest dental research."
FEATURES
By TINA DANZE and TINA DANZE,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 9, 1999
Move over, pasta. There's a new ingredient for quick-fix, Italian-inspired meals. Now polenta also solves the what's-for-dinner quandary when time is short. Not polenta made from scratch, of course -- that would require laborious stove-top cooking. It's precooked polenta that woos weeknight cooks with "heat-and-serve" convenience.You may have noticed ready-made polenta at the supermarket. In its clear plastic packaging, it resembles a fat, golden sausage -- not exactly something that screams dinner.
FEATURES
By Charles Perry, and Charles Perry,,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 1999
In the '60s, foodies discovered phyllo. In the '70s, they started to get a little tired of it.Understandably. They'd made pan after pan of baklava and spanakopita. They invented all sorts of flaky brie balls and cunning hors d'oeuvre cups in their quest to take phyllo to the limit.So when California cuisine exploded onto the scene in the '80s, phyllo was ungraciously ignored, like the guest who shows up at the party a couple of hours before the crowd. But foodies actually had gotten nowhere near the end of its possibilities.
FEATURES
By LIA GORMSEN | July 15, 2006
What it is -- The latest flavor from Haagen-Dazs: rich chocolate ice cream swirled with fudge and in fused with cinnamon. What we like about it --The chocolate falls nicely between dark and milk, with the sweetness from the cinnamon masking any hint of bitterness. The result is just what we've come to expect from Haagen-Dazs: rich, creamy, calorie-laden goodness. Inspired by an ancient-Mayan recipe, this exotic treat is quite fattening as well; check out the saturated-fat content before you indulge.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1996
You may think it is the sweetness of holiday treats that prompts you to shovel in the thousands of tongue-tickling calories that show up as extra padding by year's end. But recent studies of the human appetite show that while sugar may lead one into temptation, fat is what pushes the indulgence to caloric excess.Fat is the nutrient most commonly overconsumed and least likely to be compensated for by eating less at subsequent meals or by exercising the calories away. And while holiday treats like cookies, pies, cakes, eggnog and chocolates are certainly sweet, their main source of calories by far is fat."
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