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By TINA DANZE and TINA DANZE,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 9, 1999
Move over, pasta. There's a new ingredient for quick-fix, Italian-inspired meals. Now polenta also solves the what's-for-dinner quandary when time is short. Not polenta made from scratch, of course -- that would require laborious stove-top cooking. It's precooked polenta that woos weeknight cooks with "heat-and-serve" convenience.You may have noticed ready-made polenta at the supermarket. In its clear plastic packaging, it resembles a fat, golden sausage -- not exactly something that screams dinner.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2009
Angels Aemke of Wilmington, N.C., was seeking the recipe for the famous crab cakes that were served at Angelina's restaurant in Baltimore. She had a friend who used to send her these wonderful treats, but now that the venerable restaurant has closed (and was recently sold), she was hoping to find the recipe so that she could make the crab cakes at home. Jo Ann Nuetzel from Parkville sent in a recipe that was printed some years ago in The Sun and was reported to have come from the owner of Angelina's, the late Robert Reilly.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
The simple act of trying to keep dentures in place can trigger serious health problems, including neurological damage, a new study by University of Maryland researchers warns. Preliminary studies link the zinc in some adhesives to neurological damage and blood abnormalities, at least among patients who squeeze out too much denture cream, too often, trying to keep their teeth anchored. A review of the scientific literature by faculty members at the University of Maryland Dental School has concluded that these health risks "should be a matter of concern for all dentists caring for denture patients.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 28, 2004
Research on low-carbohydrate diets has yet to produce a conclusive medical recommendation. Scientific literature supplies material that affirms advocates and opponents, although the preponderance of evidence doesn't support low-carb diets. The Journal of the American Medical Association, for instance, last April published a review of more than 30 years of relatively short-term studies of low-carbohydrate diets. Low-carb advocates like to talk about how the report seems to answer the criticism that the relatively high-fat regimen poses a risk of cardiovascular disease.
FEATURES
February 20, 1994
The Howard County Arts Council presented its 1993 Outstanding Artist Award to Ellen Kennedy, one of the founders of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, and its 1993 Outstanding Arts Educator Award to Valerie Costantini, chair, performing arts division at Howard Community College.*Johns Hopkins University biophysicist Ernesto Freire has been awarded a $110,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson to study themolecular forces that control how blood clots.*Saul Roseman, a biology professor at Johns Hopkins University who has spend more than 40 years in research on complexcarbohydrates, has received the 1993 Karl Meyer Award for his work.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | April 22, 2006
What it is -- Doctor Kracker's version of graham crackers, made with 100 percent whole-grain spelt, sprinkled with organic raw sugar and organic cinnamon What we like about it --This cracker is a healthy alternative to sugary graham crackers. It doesn't have the same sweetness, but the extra crunchiness is satisfying. What it costs --$5.50 for an 8-ounce box Where to buy --Available at Whole Foods Market, Wegmans, Eddie's of Roland Park and drkracker .com Per serving (five pieces) --120 calories, 4 grams protein, 3 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat, 20 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 5 milligrams cholesterol, 130 milligrams sodium
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
This time of year, people have weight loss on their minds. According to a 2012 survey published in the University of Scranton's Journal of Clinical Psychology, losing weight is the No. 1 New Year's resolution. For some Baltimore residents, working toward that goal by eating healthfully has gotten easier over the past year, thanks to the introduction of healthy snacks in their office or school vending machines. In December, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman signed an executive order banning the sale of high-sugar drinks in county buildings and at county-sponsored events; Baltimore City is exploring similar initiatives.
FEATURES
March 27, 1991
Easy cheese and pasta is low in fat, high in carbohydrates, and provides important nutrients, including protein. The dish takes about 10 minutes to prepare.Cook fun-shaped pasta like wagon wheels or rotelle. Add frozen peas and corn kernels during the last minute of cooking time. Drain and toss with shredded Cheddar cheese until it melts. Add cherry tomatoes and prepared salsa.Easy Cheese and Pasta8 ounces (3 1/4 cups) wagon wheel or rotelle pasta1 cup frozen peas1 cup frozen corn kernels4 ounces (about 1 cup)
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | October 10, 1993
SALISBURY -- What began five years ago as a 100-mile training ride for serious cyclists unexpectedly drew some 3,500 riders from 24 states and Canada yesterday -- and experienced its first fatality.A 52-year-old cyclist from Severn died of multiple head injuries after apparently pedaling past a stop sign and striking the side of a moving Ford Explorer on a rural road west of the Salisbury-Wicomico County Regional Airport, police said.State police said Charles F. MacDonald Jr. died after the accident at Mount Hermon Church and Ward roads shortly before noon as he rode on the last leg of the tour.
FEATURES
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | August 20, 1997
There is a dish that I have enjoyed preparing and serving for many years called orzo pasta with fresh dill and feta cheese. It's one of my favorites not only because of its taste and appearance, but also because it's so flexible.It can be served hot from the skillet or chilled the next day. It's wonderful as a stuffing for eggplants and zucchini. You may want to use some of it in a frittata the next day. I mix it into scrambled eggs in a skillet for a warming breakfast.You should use pearl-shaped orzo pasta for this recipe because of its comforting, chewy texture and ability to absorb the clean flavors of the lemon, dill and extra virgin olive oil. If you can't find it, try acini de pepe shaped pasta, which translates into "little peppercorns" -- they look like tiny cylinders.
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