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Car Thieves

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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Sgt. Julio Valcarcel wheels his unmarked sport utility vehicle south onto U.S. 1 in Jessup as motorists whiz by in the opposite direction. The Maryland state trooper is not looking to ticket speeders, but rather is on the hunt for stolen cars. And he doesn't have to consult a "hot sheet" to compare license plate numbers, or even remember the make, model and color of vehicles on the stolen-car list. Images of license plates pop onto his laptop computer screen as the cars go by. An alarms sounds when the computer finds a stolen plate or car, or even a revoked or suspended registration, information stored in a database updated daily by the FBI and the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration.
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NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Sgt. Julio Valcarcel wheels his unmarked sport utility vehicle south onto U.S. 1 in Jessup as motorists whiz by in the opposite direction. The Maryland state trooper is not looking to ticket speeders, but rather is on the hunt for stolen cars. And he doesn't have to consult a "hot sheet" to compare license plate numbers, or even remember the make, model and color of vehicles on the stolen-car list. Images of license plates pop onto his laptop computer screen as the cars go by. An alarms sounds when the computer finds a stolen plate or car, or even a revoked or suspended registration, information stored in a database updated daily by the FBI and the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration.
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NEWS
March 22, 1994
For some misguided youths, stealing a car for a "joy ride" is a rite of passage. The offended party, of course, feels violated, especially when the stolen vehicle is never found or is recovered after costly damage is done. Society, particularly during this period of heightened fear over crime, tilts increasingly in favor of swift and severe punishment.During such a climate, making a case for leniency seems a fruitless pursuit. Still, the problem is too critical not to consider all available avenues.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | January 21, 2009
We've heard authorities say that crime goes up as the economy goes bad. That's not true for every crime. Car theft, for example, is dropping. In Baltimore, the number of cars stolen has gone from 6,662 in 2006 to 5,686 in 2007 to just over 5,100 last year. And through Jan. 10, car theft dropped 35 percent this year, compared with the same period in 2008, from 131 to 85. The trend is similar in Baltimore County, where just over 3,000 cars are stolen each year. There are two reasons for this, Baltimore County Police Sgt. Robert Jagoe told me during a morning spent with the Regional Auto Theft Task Force.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1994
There's a new breed of car thief out there -- not only adept at picking locks and bypassing alarms, but also unafraid of police and increasingly dangerous, Baltimore County authorities say."The character of the offender has changed," said Sgt. Robert Jagoe, head of the county's auto theft squad. "They're more aggressive. They used to run from us. Now, they're running at us."Like most departments in the Baltimore area, county police have cut back on high-speed chases of stolen cars, hoping to keep the thieves from driving recklessly.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 4, 2002
AND SO, for the second time in a week, I've heard from a Baltimore resident so distraught with crime that bags are being packed for departure. The first was from a disgruntled e-mailer who had his car stolen and then endured some messy red tape in dealing with city officials. The second was from my daughter, a car-theft victim for the second time since she, my son-in-law and three grandchildren moved from Dunwoodie, Ga., where it was not stolen once. The e-mailer, my daughter and son-in-law have had it with Baltimore.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2000
Kimberly Doby walked out the front door of her Dundalk apartment one recent morning and was horrified: Her 1998 Plymouth Neon was gone, stolen during the night from her complex in the 1900 block of Marsdale Road. She wasn't the only one. Five Neons had been stolen from the complex that night, illustrating what police say is a surge in the small car's popularity among young auto thieves. Doby's sister, who also owns a Neon, was spared only because she and her car were elsewhere. "We didn't realize they were as easy to steal," said Doby, 29, who has bought another Neon.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | January 21, 2009
We've heard authorities say that crime goes up as the economy goes bad. That's not true for every crime. Car theft, for example, is dropping. In Baltimore, the number of cars stolen has gone from 6,662 in 2006 to 5,686 in 2007 to just over 5,100 last year. And through Jan. 10, car theft dropped 35 percent this year, compared with the same period in 2008, from 131 to 85. The trend is similar in Baltimore County, where just over 3,000 cars are stolen each year. There are two reasons for this, Baltimore County Police Sgt. Robert Jagoe told me during a morning spent with the Regional Auto Theft Task Force.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | September 9, 1991
It was 4 a.m. when Rodney Campbell, car theft victim and friend of car theft victims, heard the noises outside his Hillendale apartment."I saw two vehicles in the parking lot with their lights off," Campbell says. "Two guys got out and started trying to break into a neighbor's car. I called 911."He says the youths ran, leaving their own cars behind, as Baltimore County police quickly responded. One youth was arrested, and one of the abandoned cars turned out to be stolen. Campbell has been to court twice as a witness, only to have the case postponed twice.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1994
Scenes from the front on a July morning in Baltimore:Dr. Barbara Bell walks out of her Roland Park home at 7 a.m. and faces an empty curb, where her black '88 Acura was parked less than an hour ago. She isn't surprised it's been stolen -- thieves have tried to get the car twice before.Steven Zucker wanders through the parking lot in his townhouse community, suitcases in hand, sure his silver '93 Honda must be somewhere nearby.Margery Dellon looks out the window and sees her son's green 1990 Acura is gone.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 21, 2004
HERE'S SOMETHING that'll really make a person feel good about himself: The car I drive is considered so undesirable that even thieves don't want it. Yes, we're talking about the Ford Taurus station wagon - one of the big, lumbering beasts squats in my driveway, spreading an oil slick the size of Lake Erie, even as I type this. Anyway, according to a new report, the Taurus wagon ranks with the Buick LeSabre and Buick Park Avenue as the car most likely to leave thieves saying: "Nah, think I'll call it a night."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2003
Baltimore County police Sgt. Bob Jagoe has investigated thousands of car thefts as a member of the Regional Auto Theft Task Force. But the one that sticks out in his mind happened on the midnight shift when he saw an Acura Legend heading up Reisterstown Road, seemingly without anyone behind the wheel. Turns out, a 10-year-old boy from Northwest Baltimore was driving. "I don't think he could see over the steering wheel," Jagoe said. That was a few years ago, but county police say the problem of juvenile car theft has persisted.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 4, 2002
AND SO, for the second time in a week, I've heard from a Baltimore resident so distraught with crime that bags are being packed for departure. The first was from a disgruntled e-mailer who had his car stolen and then endured some messy red tape in dealing with city officials. The second was from my daughter, a car-theft victim for the second time since she, my son-in-law and three grandchildren moved from Dunwoodie, Ga., where it was not stolen once. The e-mailer, my daughter and son-in-law have had it with Baltimore.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
Their cars were taken while warming up on driveways, or idling at the gas station - but police say the victims were also lawbreakers. Increasingly, investigators say, people are leaving their car engines running or leaving their keys in the ignition, violations of state motor vehicle codes. Although the victims of car theft are rarely charged with such infractions, they could find themselves without insurance coverage for the resulting loss, police say. In Anne Arundel County, where more than 1,170 vehicles were reported stolen last year, police began this month to keep track of the number of car thefts in which keys were left in the ignition.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 3, 2000
HEBRON, West Bank - A heavy steel gate opened outside a factory in the dusty village of Wadi el Harryyeh. A truck emerged and sped toward Israel, carrying high-quality pirated compact discs. Soon the CDs of rap music would be on sale in Israeli markets and bus stations. Itzik Boker, the young Israeli entrepreneur who produced the MTV collection, says he's now out of the "fake" business as a result of intense heat from the music industry in Israel and abroad. But while it lasted, his collaboration with the West Bank factory made him a lot of money, and the firm's Palestinian owners became like family to him. With official Israeli-Palestinian relations still frozen in distrust, some of the strongest links between the two peoples have formed outside the law. While legitimate business ties lagged behind, Palestinian manufacturers and Israeli marketers of all manner of counterfeit goods - computer software, name-brand jeans, packaged foods and perfume - leapt into the void, exploiting consumer demand, a porous border and weak law enforcement.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2000
Kimberly Doby walked out the front door of her Dundalk apartment one recent morning and was horrified: Her 1998 Plymouth Neon was gone, stolen during the night from her complex in the 1900 block of Marsdale Road. She wasn't the only one. Five Neons had been stolen from the complex that night, illustrating what police say is a surge in the small car's popularity among young auto thieves. Doby's sister, who also owns a Neon, was spared only because she and her car were elsewhere. "We didn't realize they were as easy to steal," said Doby, 29, who has bought another Neon.
NEWS
May 10, 1996
THE FOURTH AMENDMENT says a police officer can't pull you over unless he has reason to believe you have committed a crime or are a danger to public safety. At least, that is how courts have interpreted the law. Unfortunately, car thieves benefit from the Fourth Amendment as much as law-abiding citizens.As long as thieves follow traffic laws they can expect to drive right past police cars unless the vehicle has been reported stolen. And if the auto was taken at night, it might be morning before the owner misses it.The Baltimore City Police Department has come up with a way to keep car thieves from hiding behind the Fourth Amendment.
NEWS
September 29, 1994
POLICE LOG* Elkridge: 6100 block of Karas Walk: Someone cut a lock from a construction trailer and stole a generator, wheelbarrow and rakes early Monday, police said.6300 block of Green Field Road: A dark blue 1990 Ford Probe two-door with Maryland tags 612ARA was stolen early Monday, police said.* Ellicott City: 9400 block of Frederick Road: A green 1994 Dodge Dakota pickup with Maryland tags 797391 was stolen Monday, police said.5000 block of Stone Hill Drive: Resident returned home just as car thieves were prying the door of their 1994 Saturn about 12:40 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
At 62, Walter Gill is a book-writing rapper who teaches art at a campus surrounded by high chain-link fences and evil-looking razor wire. "Good morning, good day, buenos dias, too; Got love in my heart, got work for you to do. As Salaam Alaikum, Wa Alaikum As Salaam; Peace be upon you, keep it cool, keep it calm." That's Gill, rapping out morning greetings in Spanish and Arabic to students at the Thurgood Marshall Academy, a facility on the grounds of the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School at Cub Hill in Baltimore County that houses about 350 young men ages 14 to 18, some of them charged with rape and murder.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
Officer Yolanda Lenora Jones stopped her cruiser at a Southwest Baltimore intersection early yesterday hoping to spot a stolen Jeep Grand Cherokee that had been seen speeding on residential streets.But the alleged car thieves -- a 14-year-old driver and his 15-year-old brother -- found the officer instead.Police said the green sport utility vehicle sped through a stop sign and broadsided the officer's parked patrol car.The 3: 30 a.m. collision at South Pulaski and Ramsay streets sent the Cherokee sliding 20 feet on its roof and into a tree, and forced Jones' cruiser into a building.
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