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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
A raft of new state laws take effect Monday, imposing new requirements from the car seat to the hearse. Children under 8 years old will be required to sit in a booster seat or child seat until they reach a certain height - the Maryland legislature repealed a provision that allowed heavier children to forego a special seat. And morticians will have to follow stricter rules when handling the dead, under legislation enacted by the General Assembly earlier this year. Other laws cut costs for patients undergoing oral chemotherapy, allow sports fans to win cash prizes in online fantasy football tournaments and give prisoners a reprieve from having to pay child support while behind bars.
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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Driving on Park Heights Avenue recently, Debbi Baer happened on the kind of scene that tends to transform her, Clark Kent-style, from apparently mild-mannered Pikesville grandmother into fearless crusader. Stopped at a red light, as she recalls the story, she looked into the next car and saw a baby in a woman's lap. No seat belts or safety seats were in sight. She swung into action. The 4-foot-11 Baer used her Ford Taurus to block the woman's path. She reported the violation to a nearby policeman.
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NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2003
TERRI TAYLOR estimates that 99 percent of the infant car seats in Howard County are incorrectly installed, and she ought to know: She is a volunteer for the Howard County SAFE KIDS Coalition, which has correctly installed more than 4,000 car seats since 1999. The Howard County SAFE KIDS Coalition is working to change those statistics. Each month, they alternate between the Scaggsville Fire Station or the 5th District Fire Station in Clarksville, where parents can bring their cars and car seats to be correctly installed twice each month.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Harford County will launch a new monthly program July 19 offering free car-seat inspections for parents who want to make sure theirs are installed correctly. Other regions, including Baltimore, already offer similar inspections. Roughly three quarters of all Maryland car seats inspected last year were either improperly installed or the wrong size for the children using them, according to Harford County police. It's a frightening figure given that car crashes are the main cause of accidental death and injury for U.S. children.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1995
Car seats are everywhere. In the laundry room. In the den. In the shed. At her sister's house. They've taken over Debbie Baer's house, and they've taken over her life.Hardly a day goes by when someone doesn't call the 47-year-old Pikesville nurse for advice on buying car seats or help in installing one. She often invites callers over so she can personally inspect their car seats.Then there's her parking lot crusade. Wherever she goes, Mrs. Baer scouts for improperly installed child seats.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 2001
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - He took his dates to the drive-in movies, but also to Ku Klux Klan rallies. He obediently took one date home by her midnight curfew, but took another one to a grocery store parking lot so he could pour what he said was acid on the car seats of black shoppers in hopes of burning them. The incongruous dating life of the young Thomas E. Blanton Jr. emerged yesterday at the 62-year-old's trial on charges of murder in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church on Sept.
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1996
My son won't sit in his car seat, and if I put him in it, he slips right out when I get on the road. Help!Carol Pitchford,Denton, TexasParents across the country -- many of them veterans of car-seat wars fought in their own family vehicles -- follow one simple, unbreakable rule of the road:If the car seat's not buckled, the car doesn't move."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2003
For more than a decade, new parents have flocked to Deborah Baer's home, where the obstetric nurse may teach dozens of them a week how to properly install car seats for their children. They hear about her through the grapevine, call her up and soon they are getting private car seat lessons in her Pikesville driveway. Yesterday, she demonstrated for an assembled crowd how to use car booster seats for older children - and, in turn, how to comply with one of a series of new laws that goes into effect today.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | July 16, 2000
Her friends sometimes treat her like an evangelist with no impulse control. It's probably because she can't keep quiet when she spies a child seat improperly installed, or ill-fitting, or wrong for a child's age or size. But Brooke Edwards Greenbaum has to live with herself, too. Her friends sympathize, but they don't quite understand. She hopes they never have to. Last year, Greenbaum was a passenger in a car that crashed and left four people dead, including her father. Two people survived that accident: Greenbaum and her 15-month-old daughter Lauren, who was strapped into a child seat.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | May 6, 2001
When a friend's 17-month-old son got his neck stuck in the collapsing side rails of a portable crib and choked to death, E. Marla Felcher was stunned. Then she got angry. She had assumed it was a freak day care accident, but that wasn't entirely true. The toddler's crib had been recalled five years earlier -- but neither the government nor its manufacturer had done much to inform buyers. Worse, she soon discovered that untested and unsafe products were hardly uncommon in the infant products industry, and that the government's primary watchdog, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, can do little about it. "The problem is that there's no way for a parent to know whether the next thing they buy will perform just like that crib," says Felcher, 44, a former Gillette executive and college professor who grew up in Pikesville and now lives in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
We had planned to keep our beloved 1997 station wagon. Then something happened. On the way home from picking up a small, new SUV, its air conditioning stopped. Its temperature soared and the needle on its temperature gauge flew past "H. " The towing company took it to our trusted, longtime mechanics, Tony and Steve, who said repairs would cost about $3,000. As much as we loved that little white wagon, we could not indulge in that repair after we had just bought a new car. On April 23, we bid the wagon adieu.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
A raft of new state laws take effect Monday, imposing new requirements from the car seat to the hearse. Children under 8 years old will be required to sit in a booster seat or child seat until they reach a certain height - the Maryland legislature repealed a provision that allowed heavier children to forego a special seat. And morticians will have to follow stricter rules when handling the dead, under legislation enacted by the General Assembly earlier this year. Other laws cut costs for patients undergoing oral chemotherapy, allow sports fans to win cash prizes in online fantasy football tournaments and give prisoners a reprieve from having to pay child support while behind bars.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 24, 2012
A state program will begin offering instruction on properly installing child safety seats via video chat, potentially reaching parents who can't get to an inspection event. The program will begin April 30 as a pilot. Parents can sign up for a free Skype account and make an appointment for a chat by calling 1-800-370-SEAT. The parents will also have to complete a participant confirmation form. The parents, sitting in view of their car seat with their smart phone or laptop, will get a call.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
A Maryland doctors' group is pushing legislation to bolster the state's child safety seat laws, a move designed to better protect toddlers from head, neck and spinal injuries during accidents. The Maryland State Medical Society, also known as MedChi, wants the state to adopt recommendations made last year by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The recommendations include lengthening the amount of time young children have to stay in seats facing the rear of the car and raising the age that children should have to sit in the back seat.
NEWS
By Les Cohen | September 4, 2011
We're having a baby. By "we," I mean my daughter and her husband. A new baby means, of course, a new child-safety seat for the car. I've been using an old Cabbage Patch doll to make sure I know how this new car seat works. (Remember Cabbage Patch dolls? This one was my daughter's, which my wife insisted we save, in the warehouse we call a basement, for our grandchildren.) The car seat comes with a 68-page manual. The one we got our own kids years ago had, I think, a sticker that said, "Insert baby here," with an arrow: "This end up. " The seat we just bought is a top-of-the-line Britax (pronounced with a long "i")
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | August 25, 2011
If you've got a baby on the way or one or more already at home, consider swapping out used equipment like strollers, cribs and car seats for discounts on purchases of other baby goods. Toys"R"Us is holding its fifth Great Trade In event from Fri., Aug. 26 to Sun., Sept. 18. Bring in used items from your own parenting experiences or hand-me-downs your friends and relatives may have shared, and exchange them for vouchers for 25 percent off new baby products in certain categories made by certain manufacturers.
NEWS
By Carolyn Melago and Carolyn Melago,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 19, 1998
Five-year-old Gerald "Little Jerry" Gorham is tiring of his recent star status. He'd rather chat with his mom about a school party than talk on "Good Morning America" about the car wreck that seriously injured him almost eight months ago.But his parents, Tonya and Gerald Gorham, believe the safety advice they discovered after the accident is too important to keep to themselves.As the "spokesfamily" for last week's Child Passenger Safety Week -- a nationwide effort to reduce the misuse of child car restraints sponsored by the Safe Kids Campaign -- the Columbia family has shared its story with nationwide audiences, including a five-minute segment on ABC's morning news program and a news conference at Washington's Planet Hollywood.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Chris Guy and Greg Garland and Chris Guy,Sun reporters | December 12, 2006
Richard Spicknall II, who seven years ago shot and killed his two small children while they were strapped in their car seats, was found dead in the showers at a Jessup prison over the weekend, authorities said yesterday. The state medical examiner ruled the death a "homicide by general asphyxia." Spicknall, 34, was discovered with a rag or towel stuffed in his mouth, according to prison system sources. A prison spokesman called his death "a mystery" and said it is under investigation. As a convicted child killer, Spicknall feared for his life in prison and was housed in protective custody at the Jessup Correctional Institution, away from the general inmate population, said Michael A Mastracci, a Catonsville attorney who knew the inmate and corresponded with him. In letters to Mastracci during his years in prison, Spicknall expressed remorse for taking the children's lives.
TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Tribune Newspapers | July 12, 2009
Question: : I am planning to fly with my 5-year-old grandson from Roanoke, Va., to Mexico City. Does Mexico require a car seat? Answer: : In researching this question, I found conflicting answers. The World Health Organization says child restraint systems are the law in Mexico. But a representative answering the phone for the Mexican Secretariat of Tourism, 800-446-39-426, recommended in the U.S. State Department's consular information sheet, told me, "The seat is not a requirement, so don't worry.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt, Justin Fenton and Gus G. Sentementes and Laura Barnhardt, Justin Fenton and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporters | July 23, 2008
Clint Jones, back home in southern Anne Arundel County but still wearing a hospital gown, and bandages on his head, grimaced with pain as he recalled the early-morning accident on Interstate 83. He and a cousin had been making idle chatter about how much farther the group had to drive to get to Harrisburg. A 2-month-old boy was in a car seat. The baby's mother had the wheel. "The next thing I know, we hit the rumble strip," Jones said. The driver "went one way, went the other way, then tried to correct it, and the car did a 180 into the guardrail," he said.
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