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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
The comments former Maryland offensive coordinator James Franklin made about the criteria he uses in choosing his assistant coaches at Vanderbilt came as a surprise to me. I always thought Franklin, like a lot of college coaches, was a used car salesman, not a sexist. If you haven't heard, the second-year Vanderbilt coach was chatting up a Nashville radio talk show when the subject of assistant coaches came up. Instead of saying something like, “I took the best guys off Ralph Friedgen's staff and cost him his job,” Franklin said, “I've been saying for a long time, I will not hire an assistant until I've seen his wife.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Frank Anechiarico, a passionate car salesman and one-time owner of Baltimore County's Valley Chevrolet, died June 27 at Brightview Mays Chapel Ridge, an assisted-living facility. He was 91 and had suffered a stroke. "He started out selling used cars as a wholesaler, then worked his way up to be a dealer," said his son-in-law, Lloyd Haak, the general manager of Wantz Chevrolet in Taneytown, who met his future wife while working as a salesman for Mr. Anechiarico at Valley Chevrolet.
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NEWS
March 19, 2006
Walter O. Brandau Jr., a car salesman and children's sports coach, died in his sleep March 12 at Warren Place senior housing and senior center in Cockeysville. He was 74. Mr. Brandau grew up in Baltimore, where he attended City College. After graduating, he joined the Navy, serving from 1951 to 1954. Mr. Brandau was aboard the aircraft carrier USS Bennington on May 26, 1954, when a catapult exploded, killing 103 crew members and injuring 201. He felt fortunate to survive but lost many friends, said his son, Mark W. Brandau of Timonium.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Vernon J. Jones, a former mechanic and car salesman who established the Jones Junction Auto Group in Harford County, which grew to become the largest family-owned retail auto dealership in Maryland, died Monday of complications from Parkinson's disease at his Bel Air home. He was 88. "Vernon was an outstanding man who always had a smile on his face, and he always wanted to help people and give them a good deal on a car," said Jim Helbert, a former Bel Air resident. "I bought my first car from Vernon, and he wanted to make a deal.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1995
He's been called a slick salesman, an evil Pied Piper and an all-star thief.But when Gino Marchetti Jones was sentenced last week in Anne Arundel Circuit Court it was the first time -- despite a decade of criminal convictions -- that the elusive car salesman was put behind bars for a lengthy prison term.Judge Bruce C. Williams sentenced the 34-year-old Columbia man to 10 years in prison on five counts of felony theft, and one count each of false advertising, misrepresentation and auto dealing without a license.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Frank Anechiarico, a passionate car salesman and one-time owner of Baltimore County's Valley Chevrolet, died June 27 at Brightview Mays Chapel Ridge, an assisted-living facility. He was 91 and had suffered a stroke. "He started out selling used cars as a wholesaler, then worked his way up to be a dealer," said his son-in-law, Lloyd Haak, the general manager of Wantz Chevrolet in Taneytown, who met his future wife while working as a salesman for Mr. Anechiarico at Valley Chevrolet.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
Every once in a while, when Ravens fullback Alan Ricard has a free moment during the offseason, he will take a drive past his former place of employment in Houston, then thank heavens he is playing professional football. You might not consider being a car salesman at a Ford dealership the world's worst job, yet it was for Ricard, who left the profession in 1999 after a month's stint. "That just wasn't me," said the relatively low-key Ricard. Ricard was living with his sister in Houston after being cut by the Dallas Cowboys during training camp that year.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Scott Donahoo, a former car salesman known for his boisterous television commercials, told a local radio station that he is giving "serious consideration" to a run for mayor next year, joining an already crowded field of potential candidates. Scott Donahoo told Jimmy Mathis of WBAL radio that as mayor, he would drastically cut property taxes and increase the city's police presence. "We have lost a tremendous amount of the police department due to the failed policies of previous administrations and current administration," Donahoo said during the interview.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | January 5, 2010
A former Maryland State Police trooper was sentenced Monday to five years in prison without the possibility of parole for pulling a gun on a car salesman he suspected was involved with his wife. John Lee Evans Jr., 39, of Baltimore, choked back tears as he apologized to Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Michele D. Jaklitsch for "being in front of you for this matter" and told her his life has taken a "downward spiral." He was convicted of assault and handgun charges. The weapons conviction carries a mandatory five years in prison without parole.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Vernon J. Jones, a former mechanic and car salesman who established the Jones Junction Auto Group in Harford County, which grew to become the largest family-owned retail auto dealership in Maryland, died Monday of complications from Parkinson's disease at his Bel Air home. He was 88. "Vernon was an outstanding man who always had a smile on his face, and he always wanted to help people and give them a good deal on a car," said Jim Helbert, a former Bel Air resident. "I bought my first car from Vernon, and he wanted to make a deal.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
The comments former Maryland offensive coordinator James Franklin made about the criteria he uses in choosing his assistant coaches at Vanderbilt came as a surprise to me. I always thought Franklin, like a lot of college coaches, was a used car salesman, not a sexist. If you haven't heard, the second-year Vanderbilt coach was chatting up a Nashville radio talk show when the subject of assistant coaches came up. Instead of saying something like, “I took the best guys off Ralph Friedgen's staff and cost him his job,” Franklin said, “I've been saying for a long time, I will not hire an assistant until I've seen his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 25, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation National  • Thank God you live in America: China arrests Christians for having Easter service . (AFP)  • Thank God you live in America, II: Syria's bloody weekend . (Financial Times)  • Taliban stages huge prison break . (AP)  • The heroism of regular people: Attempted plane hijacker  overpowered . (Reuters)
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Scott Donahoo, a former car salesman known for his boisterous television commercials, told a local radio station that he is giving "serious consideration" to a run for mayor next year, joining an already crowded field of potential candidates. Scott Donahoo told Jimmy Mathis of WBAL radio that as mayor, he would drastically cut property taxes and increase the city's police presence. "We have lost a tremendous amount of the police department due to the failed policies of previous administrations and current administration," Donahoo said during the interview.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
A former Maryland State Police trooper was sentenced Monday to five years in prison without the possibility of parole for pulling a gun on a car salesman he suspected was involved with his wife. John Lee Evans Jr., 39, of Baltimore, choked back tears as he apologized to Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Michele D. Jaklitsch for "being in front of you for this matter" and told her his life has taken a "downward spiral." He was convicted of assault and handgun charges.
NEWS
December 11, 2006
Hercules P. Esibill, a retired car salesman and World War II merchant seaman who survived two shipwrecks, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Catonsville resident was 81. Mr. Esibill was born and raised in Millville, N.J., the son of a boatyard owner. He dropped out of high school in 1942 and went to sea as a wiper on the Mercury, an oil tanker. The ship was sunk later that year by a German U-boat near Cuba. During World War II, he sailed in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and the Mediterranean Sea. While aboard the Lancaster, the ship came under attack by German aircraft.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2006
DENVER -- Defying a steady mist that accompanied a cold wind and standing outside Invesco Field at Mile High more than seven hours before last night's prime-time contest between the Ravens and Denver Broncos, Aaron Mills proclaimed yesterday a good day to tailgate. "This is kind of light," said Mills, a 25-year-old car salesman from Denver. "It gets bad sometimes, but this isn't bad at all." Mills, who stood outside Lot C with his friend Aaron Wallace, was one of several Broncos fans who braved the elements yesterday in anticipation of the 54th Monday night contest in club history.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
What does Apple Ford car salesman Lester D. Parker Sr. have in common with the shiny 1957 red-and-white Ford Thunderbird he's standing next to?Both are classics.Before officially retiring last week, Mr. Parker sold cars for 48 years and was one of the first black car salesmen in the history of the Apple Ford franchise, which now is in Columbia but has roots in several dealerships in Baltimore.Though initially prevented from selling cars because of his race, he went on to become one of the dealership's most successful salesmen, selling an estimated 5,000 cars.
BUSINESS
By JIM MATEJA and JIM MATEJA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 26, 2006
CHICAGO -- He doesn't wear a cowboy hat and mask like the Lone Ranger, an early Chrysler pitchman. Nor does he wear a tuxedo and promote the rich Corinthian leather, as actor Ricardo Montalban did. And forget the expensive imported Burberry raincoat that Lee Iacocca sported when imploring shoppers to "Buy American." All he has is a bushy mustache, a pronounced accent and a wry sense of humor. And he uses those well as he runs a crossover vehicle into a crash barrier, expertly folds passenger seats into the floor of a minivan and bounces a soccer ball off his head.
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