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By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 19, 2013
I'm not sure if this is a tale of distracted parenting or car safety, but either one works. My 10-year-old son -- who is about one inch shorter than me, if that -- has been begging to ride shotgun for quite some time. It's not a daily question, but almost. "But so-and-so gets to ride in the front seat!" And it's true, I see many of his friends up front. I want to joke that I guess I just love him more than they love their kids but I'm afraid he'll repeat it and the joke part will get lost in translation.
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By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 19, 2013
I'm not sure if this is a tale of distracted parenting or car safety, but either one works. My 10-year-old son -- who is about one inch shorter than me, if that -- has been begging to ride shotgun for quite some time. It's not a daily question, but almost. "But so-and-so gets to ride in the front seat!" And it's true, I see many of his friends up front. I want to joke that I guess I just love him more than they love their kids but I'm afraid he'll repeat it and the joke part will get lost in translation.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
On the surface, those doggie seatbelts and car harnesses featured in catalogs seem like a good idea. After all, if we buckle up on the road, shouldn't our pets? The difference is that while human seatbelts are carefully tested and held to strict quality and design standards, the same is not true for pet restraints, so there's no guarantee Fido or Fluffy is actually safer wearing one. That may be about to change. Carmaker Subaru of America, Inc. , announced it has teamed up with the Center for Pet Safety to fund testing of car safety restraints for pets.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
On the surface, those doggie seatbelts and car harnesses featured in catalogs seem like a good idea. After all, if we buckle up on the road, shouldn't our pets? The difference is that while human seatbelts are carefully tested and held to strict quality and design standards, the same is not true for pet restraints, so there's no guarantee Fido or Fluffy is actually safer wearing one. That may be about to change. Carmaker Subaru of America, Inc. , announced it has teamed up with the Center for Pet Safety to fund testing of car safety restraints for pets.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | August 27, 1991
For years, many U.S. businesses have handed employees the keys to a company car with no questions asked. For all these firms know, their drivers may have a suspended driver's license or a very blotchy accident record.But the cost of an average on-the-job vehicle accident has risen to $8,200, and companies should no longer take such a casual approachto driver safety, executives at the Hunt Valley-based PHH Corp. say.PHH is banking on the notion that making company drivers safer drivers will be a good line of business.
NEWS
February 27, 2001
PROTECTING children riding in cars from serious injury -- or death -- is a constant parental concern. Youngsters below the age of 4 must, by law, be placed in car-safety seats. But how do you protect older children from harm? Auto-safety experts say kids ages 4 to 8 who weigh between 40 and 80 pounds, should be using a booster seat. This device positions a child so that the lap-and-shoulder seat belt fits properly. That's crucial because seat belts alone may not protect children in a crash.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | July 16, 2000
Her friends sometimes treat her like an evangelist with no impulse control. It's probably because she can't keep quiet when she spies a child seat improperly installed, or ill-fitting, or wrong for a child's age or size. But Brooke Edwards Greenbaum has to live with herself, too. Her friends sympathize, but they don't quite understand. She hopes they never have to. Last year, Greenbaum was a passenger in a car that crashed and left four people dead, including her father. Two people survived that accident: Greenbaum and her 15-month-old daughter Lauren, who was strapped into a child seat.
NEWS
February 28, 2001
Today's highlights 10 a.m. Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m. House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 1 p.m. House Commerce and Government Matters Committee, hearing on bill to require children younger than age 8 to ride in car safety seats, Room 140, Lowe House Office Building. 1 p.m. Senate Finance Committee, hearing on bill to allow payday lending, 3 East, Miller Senate Office Building.
NEWS
March 11, 2001
Health workers to check child car safety seats The Carroll County Health Department will hold a child car safety seat check from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. March 22 at Len Stoler Chevrolet. The safety seat check is sponsored by Safe Kids/CRASH Coalition. Staff also will answer questions about car seats. Len Stoler is at Route 140 and Center Street. Information: 410-876-4448. Annual MS walk slated April 21-22 in Westminster The Maryland Chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society will hold its annual MS Walk April 21 and 22 in Westminster.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 10, 2012
State lawmakers have passed legislation pushed by Maryland doctors that will change the state's child safety seat laws. The law requires children under the age of 8 to sit in a child car safety seats unless they are 4'9" or taller. The bill, pushed by doctors group MedChi, did not include requirements that kids stay rear facing until age 2 or ride in the backseat until age 13 as the doctors group had wanted. Maryland law still recommends that kids under age 13 sit in the backseat.
NEWS
February 27, 2001
PROTECTING children riding in cars from serious injury -- or death -- is a constant parental concern. Youngsters below the age of 4 must, by law, be placed in car-safety seats. But how do you protect older children from harm? Auto-safety experts say kids ages 4 to 8 who weigh between 40 and 80 pounds, should be using a booster seat. This device positions a child so that the lap-and-shoulder seat belt fits properly. That's crucial because seat belts alone may not protect children in a crash.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | July 16, 2000
Her friends sometimes treat her like an evangelist with no impulse control. It's probably because she can't keep quiet when she spies a child seat improperly installed, or ill-fitting, or wrong for a child's age or size. But Brooke Edwards Greenbaum has to live with herself, too. Her friends sympathize, but they don't quite understand. She hopes they never have to. Last year, Greenbaum was a passenger in a car that crashed and left four people dead, including her father. Two people survived that accident: Greenbaum and her 15-month-old daughter Lauren, who was strapped into a child seat.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | August 27, 1991
For years, many U.S. businesses have handed employees the keys to a company car with no questions asked. For all these firms know, their drivers may have a suspended driver's license or a very blotchy accident record.But the cost of an average on-the-job vehicle accident has risen to $8,200, and companies should no longer take such a casual approachto driver safety, executives at the Hunt Valley-based PHH Corp. say.PHH is banking on the notion that making company drivers safer drivers will be a good line of business.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2001
Measures to improve children's safety in cars and on in-line skates and scooters took major steps forward in the Maryland Senate yesterday. If approved by the General Assembly and signed by the governor, parents across Maryland would have to strap children into car safety seats until age 8, and children younger than 16 would be required to wear helmets when on in-line skates or scooters. "This was a good day for children's safety," said Sen. Jennie M. Forehand, a Montgomery County Democrat and sponsor of the car safety seat proposal.
NEWS
July 18, 2004
Safety checkup Tuesday for child car safety seats The Carroll County Health Department will hold a child car safety seat check from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday at the Target store on Malcolm Drive in Westminster. The event is sponsored by Safe Kids/CRASH Coalition. Certified personnel check the seats for proper installation, including seat belts being locked and correct use of locking clips. The staff will answer questions about car seats and other child safety restraints. Information: 410-876-4448.
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