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By Tom Patterson and Tom Patterson,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 1999
GREENSBORO, N.C. -- Since its advent in the years after World War II, stock car racing has enjoyed a wide following in the South, and North Carolina has been one of the hotbeds of this daredevil motor sport.In hopes of capitalizing on its mass appeal, the Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art is presenting "Just Racin': Art on Wheels," a show of contemporary works inspired by stock car racing. Most of the works were created for this show, which runs through Aug. 27, and few of the 29 artists had demonstrated any particular interest in racing before they were invited to participate.
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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Brad Banker grew up a sports fan outside Green Bay, Wis., but auto racing was not high on his list of passions. His father was a longtime employee of the Packers and Banker, who somehow became a fan of the rival Minnesota Vikings, wound up playing football and lacrosse at Moorhead State in Minnesota. Banker taught for a year after getting his master's, but went into commercial real estate to make a little more money. But it wasn't until Banker got his commercial trucking license and found a job working for Andretti Racing that he finally found his dream job. Starting off driving the team's haulers from stop to stop, Banker eventually got a part-time gig changing tires on pit road and wound up overseeing the team's logistical issues for everything from corporate tents to Port-o-Johns.
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FEATURES
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SANDRA MCKEE is a sports writer for The Sun | August 2, 1992
"There are only three real sports. Mountain climbing, bull fighting and auto racing. Everything else is a game . . ." Ernest Hemingway.Seen on a sweat shirt at a stock car race It's hot. Noses are burning. Shoulders blistering. Knees turning as red as a steamed Maryland crab, but those facts never register with fans of major-league stock car racing.Cold, rain, snow fail to deter them, too. Hands may numb and lips turn as blue as the Chesapeake Bay, but the fans grip their cups of coffee or hot chocolate in one hand, tuck their blankets around their legs with the other and never complain.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | August 31, 2013
Some of open-wheel racing's biggest names didn't make it into the Top 12 Saturday for Sunday's Izod IndyCar Series race in the Grand Prix of Baltimore. Dario Franchitti, who has won the pole at four events this year, will start 15 th , one spot ahead of Indianapolis 500 champion Tony Kanaan and three ahead of Marco Andretti. Kanaan, who finished second to Will Power in the inaugural Baltimore race two years ago, said afterward that he thought he was headed for the second round of qualifying before “we got caught up in some traffic” that resulted from a single-car crash involving E.J. Viso.
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2006
There was something about car racing that always interested Jason Smith, even as a child. He's not sure what drew him to the sport. It could have been the speed or the high level of competition. The 30-year-old Finksburg resident said it's likely a combination of the two along with other factors. But Smith is entranced by the sport. He's done it in different forms and returns to dirt-track racing this spring. Smith works full time as a service manager for an independent auto repair facility in Finksburg but devotes as much time as possible away from the job to his passion for racing.
NEWS
November 22, 1992
Richard Petty retired last weekend. His name doesn't usually show up on editorial pages, but social historians who want to understand this age need to take careful note of his career and his fans. He's a stock car driver.Except for major league baseball and horse racing, no professional sport in America draws the crowds that auto racing does. And no baseball players and very few jockeys have had a career as long as Richard Petty's. His last race Sunday at Atlanta Motor Speedway, at age 55, came 35 years after his first.
FEATURES
October 25, 1992
REVVED UP ABOUT RACINGEditor:I'd like your readers to know that there was once more to stock car racing ["Daze of Thunder," Aug. 2] besides the roar of the engines, partying and idolizing a few drivers who risk their lives for money.[One time] I was traveling to Florida and stopped overnight in Charlotte, N.C. I was having trouble with a manifold gasket. In the morning while I was eating breakfast I noticed Dick Rathman, who was driving in the Charlotte 500 that day. He was racing the same kind of car I was driving.
NEWS
August 18, 1997
PLENTY OF ISSUES must be resolved before Baltimore County clears the way for a NASCAR speedway in Middle River. But the sport's popularity is not one of them. Stock car racing is much like country music. For years it had a devoted but demographically limited following. More recently, it has grown beyond its roots into a mainstream phenomenon. While certainly not the sole consideration in deciding if a new speedway should be built, this is an important one.How significantly has this sport changed?
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Kenny Irwin looks at you with these bright, shimmering blue eyes and you immediately know why his mom is lobbying for a sunglasses contract that wouldn't require him to wear shades during interviews and in victory lane."
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
Coming to a mall near you: the Daytona 500. No, not that Daytona 500, the so-called Great American Race. The Daytona 500 fragrance, which "embodies the confidence, power and intensity of the men daring enough to race in the ultimate adrenaline rush." If cologne doesn't get your motor started, there's plenty more for the NASCAR lover in anyone. Those in need of a heart-racing boost can check out In the Groove, the first Harlequin romance novel based on stock car racing. Families fixing for a cookout can stock up on NASCAR-brand hot dogs, smoked sausages and fresh produce.
NEWS
August 28, 2013
They say the third time is the charm, and it's likely that this year's running of the Baltimore Grand Prix will go a lot further toward answering the crucial question that the first two iterations of the ostensibly annual event left unclear. Can IndyCar auto racing establish itself as a viable permanent institution in Baltimore City, or will it turn out to be a well-intentioned but failed experiment that in the end was unable to meet the high expectations of its supporters? Much of the answer will depend on how many people turn out for the race, how enthusiastic a reception they give it, and what the economic impact of their presence is on the downtown area's hotels, restaurants and other businesses.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
Baltimore's WBFF-TV Fox 45 will produce a 30-minute special to air the Thursday before this year's third edition of the Grand Prix of Baltimore. According to a news release from race organizers, the show will offer live interviews and behind-the-scenes features related to the weekend of racing. It is scheduled to air Thursday, Aug. 29 at 5:30 p.m. Racing begins Friday, with the IndyCar race Sunday afternoon. "We're proud to offer our audience comprehensive coverage of this signature Baltimore event," Bill Fanshawe, general manager at WBFF, said in a statement.
SPORTS
September 6, 2012
This summer, the citizens of Baltimore and the surrounding region have experienced two special multi-million-dollar events that consumed the Inner Harbor area for days. Each one took a lot of planning and cooperation. Each one was entertaining for those who attended. Local newspaper and TV coverage was full of both. National and international media paid attention to both. Thousands of photos have and will appear on Facebook and Flickr and be e-mailed. YouTube videos will continue to be posted all year.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Everyone knows there are major differences between 17-year-old race car drivers and 30-something race car drivers. But it couldn't be better illustrated than the activity of Star Mazda driver Zach Veach Wednesday and IndyCar drivers Will Power and Ryan Hunter-Reay, who are in the midst of a championship fight during this Grand Prix of Baltimore weekend. Wednesday afternoon, Power, 31, spent his time doing media interviews at a luncheon in downtown Baltimore, while Hunter-Reay, who will be 32 in December, also took the opportunity to take a nap before getting ready for a sponsor activity Wednesday evening.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
Racing champion Michael Andretti is working on a last-minute effort to organize the Baltimore Grand Prix, teaming with two local businessmen to put together the Labor Day street racing festival, the mayor's office announced Thursday. The new racing group, Race On LLC, will be headed by J.P. Grant , a Columbia-based financier with close ties to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, and Curtis Bay concrete contractor Greg O'Neill. They will provide the financial muscle behind the group, which must speed through preparations in 31/2 months.
SPORTS
December 16, 2011
Baltimore and/or Maryland has very limited experience when it comes to automobile racing as compared to all our surrounding states. Look at the Formula One project that hopes to get underway next year in Austin, Texas. Or you may want to look to the cost incurred for seven races in Indianapolis. Then you can look at Richmond, Va., Dover, Del., and Pocono, Penn., for a NASCAR flavor. And then publish comparison findings. I think, in general, you had some very inexperienced promoters willing to accept inflated costs by different Baltimore authorities.
NEWS
August 26, 1997
Region doesn't need fifth NASCAR trackYour Aug. 18 editorial's description of the legend of stock car racing's origins is a little blurred regarding Prohibition's influence on the activity of moonshine running. Prohibition ended many years before the heyday of "shine runners" in the late 1930s and through the 1940s.NASCAR's formula for success has always been based on racing the cars that race fans own and drive. That product recognition and loyalty to a great extent fueled the popularity of the ''muscle cars'' of the 1960s and 1970s, and carries over today to the sponsor's products advertised on the hoods and sides of NASCAR's race cars and trucks.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | November 26, 2006
Verna Horsey blew up a green balloon and helped Alex Sandmeier attach it to a tube on a toy race car. The 5-year-old put the car on the floor, hoping it would zip away in a flash. But the car lurched about two feet and sputtered to a stop. "Oh no," groaned Horsey, a fourth-grade teacher at Hickory Elementary School. "That one was a dud." The Bel Air kindergartner giggled while Horsey blew up another balloon. This time he let go of the car and it sped across the floor. "Wow! 110 inches!
SPORTS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
IndyCar racing officials and Baltimore's mayor said Thursday they are still committed to holding another Grand Prix, even though the company that runs the event is millions of dollars past due on its bills and is weighing a takeover proposal from a local financier. Terry Angstadt, president of IndyCar's commercial division, expressed confidence in the management team that has proposed buying a controlling stake in Baltimore Racing Development Inc., the event organizer. But he added that he's not endorsing any particular bidder.
NEWS
October 19, 2011
If Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has one regret about the Baltimore Grand Prix, it would probably be her use of the phrase "game changer" to describe the event's impact on Baltimore. Given the magnitude of the city's problems and the fleeting nature of the race, that kind of promise set up a level of expectation that three days of cars zooming around the Inner Harbor could not possibly meet. That, essentially, is the point of a new study by Dennis Coates, a professor of economics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Michael T. Friedman of the University of Maryland's School of Public Health.
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