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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Offering potential relief to long-suffering city motorists, Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday unveiled plans designed to make it easier and cheaper to buy private car insurance in Baltimore.Proposed legislation would give incentives to major insurance companies to market their services as aggressively in the city as they do elsewhere across the state. A company that insures 10 percent of all Maryland drivers, for instance, would be expected to sell policies to at least 7.5 percent of all city drivers by 1998.
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NEWS
August 8, 2014
Sunday, Aug. 10 Moon kayaking Kayak a stretch of the Patuxent from Wooton's Landing, 4550 Sands Road, Harwood, to Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., ending under a full moon. Marsh ecology and history will be discussed along the way. For experienced paddlers 13 years and older. Cost is $20. Information and registration: aacounty.org/recparks or 410-222-7313. Summer concert Pilgrim and Trout performs at 5 p.m. at Historic London Town and Gardens, 839 Londontown Road in Edgewater.
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BUSINESS
By Lynn Simross and Lynn Simross,Los Angeles Times | June 2, 1991
If you are planning to rent a car, you might be smart to do little homework before you get to the rental counter.The agent will ask if you want to purchase a Collision Damage Waiver or a Loss Damage Waiver, which protects you from paying a high deductible or full value if the car is damaged or stolen.A CDW or LDW is not insurance: It is a waiver of the rental company's right to charge you for repairs or replacement.That extra coverage can be costly. CDWs and LDWs range from $5 to $14 per day, depending on the state in which the car is rented.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 20, 2014
Faithful readers know that the impending wedding of my daughter has caused me to clean out all the rats' nests and cubby holes in my basement that haven't been inspected in years. You'd think we were holding the reception there. Anyway, among the boxes was one containing about 15 years of canceled checks, bank statements, health insurance forms and tax returns. Even I, renowned recycling maven, haven't got the nerve to put that much personal information out on the curb, so I purchased my own personal shredder, which is a lot like purchasing your own personal fax machine.
NEWS
March 29, 1996
THE GOVERNOR'S auto-insurance bill promised big changes and lower premiums for Maryland drivers. In some cases, the reductions would be quite large, as fraud and double-dipping are eliminated. But that was before vested interests, who profit from inflated car-insurance premiums, had their say before the General Assembly.By the time they were finished, the bill had been picked clean. What remained was a shell of the original measure. It means that car drivers will continue to pay far more in insurance than they should.
BUSINESS
By Evening Sun Staff | April 2, 1991
A group led by Baltimore City Council President Mary Pat Clarke has lost yet another effort to lower car-insurance rates in the city.Baltimore Fair Auto Insurance Rate Inc. lost an appeal to force Insurance Commission John A. Donaho to hold another hearing on a rate increase for Allstate Insurance Co.Baltimore FAIR's appeal was directed against a 3 percent increase granted to Allstate by the state Insurance Division last May.Last week, Baltimore Circuit Court...
NEWS
December 23, 1996
WANT TO LOWER your car-insurance premiums? It could happen -- if legislators in Annapolis stop catering to powerful special interests. More than 60 percent of your premium covers liability. Of that amount, 19 percent could be saved if excessive litigation and fraudulent claims were eliminated.Sadly, state legislators yawned at the problem when a gubernatorial commission sought reforms this year. Too many of them want to please trial lawyers and doctors who vigorously fight for the status quo. These special interests know that lower insurance premiums would come out of their pockets.
NEWS
October 13, 1995
IT'S TERRIBLE what people who live in Baltimore City have to pay for their car insurance. But that doesn't mean it's all right for people to avoid the higher costs by telling the Department of Motor Vehicles and their insurance company they live outside town. In fact, it is against the law.Anyone found violating that law ought to be prosecuted. That includes state election board chief Gene M. Raynor, 6th District City Councilman Norman A. Handy Sr. and 3rd District council candidate Joan Carter Conway.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Drivers who buy their car insurance through the Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund, the state's auto insurer of last resort, seem always to be the door mats of the State House, but that comparison might be too generous. Rugs get a little respect every once in a while. For years, we have groused that MAIF customers — and there are about 36,000 of them on any given day — are legally fleeced by premium finance companies. Under state law, MAIF must collect insurance premiums in advance, but since most customers don't have the money for a year's worth of coverage (on average, at a cost of about $1,800)
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
The rates Baltimore-area drivers pay for the same six-month car insurance policy vary by as much as $764, the second-highest figure in the nation, according to a survey commissioned by one of the state's largest car insurance providers.And even though some experts said those numbers are overstated, the survey points out the need to do comparison shopping when looking for auto insurance, said Progressive Auto Insurance, which released the findings yesterday.Nationally, six-month rates varied an average of $481.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
As executive director of the Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund, I applaud The Sun's editorial, "Relief for Baltimore drivers" (Sept. 3) and share the concerns it raised about the cost of automobile insurance in Baltimore City. Many city drivers struggle to meet their insurance payments. The General Assembly, recognizing this, recently allowed MAIF to begin collecting installment payments, which as your editorial noted, lowers the real cost of a policy by over $250 for the average MAIF insured.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
Consumer advocates say they didn't get everything on their wish list during the latest meeting of the General Assembly, but the session produced several victories for Maryland consumers. For example, Marylanders would find it easier to buy auto coverage from a state insurance fund, foster children would gain protection from identity thieves and debtors would be less likely to be jailed under bills recently passed by lawmakers. Gov. Martin O'Malley is expected to sign these and other consumer-friendly bills next month.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Before lawmakers in Annapolis propose legislation, they should know what they are talking about ("Senate approves two-tier licenses," March 26). Prince George's County Democrat Del. Jolene Ivey introduced the House version of a bill that would allow illegal immigrants to obtain Maryland driver's licenses by calling it a "safety issue. " "I want to know they have car insurance, that they know not to flee when they're getting pulled over or in an accident," she said. First, car insurance is not required to get a license.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
Exactly what makes Del. Jolene Ivey believe that issuing a license to illegal immigrants in Maryland will guarantee that "they have car insurance" or that "they know not to flee when they're getting pulled over or in an accident?" ("Senate approves two-tier licenses," March 26). Certainly it won't. They don't even have to be able to read, speak or write English. The state must provide an interpreter to enable them to pass the license test. Is that interpreter going to ride with them forever to interpret signs or a law enforcement officer's direction?
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Maryland could become one of a handful of states that grant special driver's licenses to illegal immigrants under legislation garnering strong support in Annapolis. The bill, passed by the Senate on Monday, would expand and make permanent an existing two-tiered driver's license system to include more than 100,000 people whose immigration status currently prevents them from applying for a license. Gov. Martin O'Malley backs the plan, which now moves to the House of Delegates. "It's a safety issue," said Del. Jolene Ivey, a Prince George's County Democrat who introduced the House version.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
A lot of people are opposed to allowing illegal immigrants the ability to obtain a driver's license, and I do understand their point of view, but I'd like to point out the benefits of illegal immigrants having a license: •In case of a car accident, the illegal immigrant will have the ability to present his license to verify his identity and to provide it to both the police, if needed or requested, and those involved in the accident. Would you rather have him give you a fake name?
NEWS
March 25, 2005
BALTIMORE'S CAR insurance rates are too high. A recent Abell Foundation report concluded that city drivers pay 60 percent more for car insurance than their suburban counterparts. There are many reasons for this, but at least one is easily corrected. Many city drivers get their insurance through the Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund. And thousands of these MAIF drivers are paying finance charges equivalent to 26 percent or more. That's outrageous - and it isn't MAIF's fault. MAIF is a state agency created 32 years ago as an insurer of last resort.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Before lawmakers in Annapolis propose legislation, they should know what they are talking about ("Senate approves two-tier licenses," March 26). Prince George's County Democrat Del. Jolene Ivey introduced the House version of a bill that would allow illegal immigrants to obtain Maryland driver's licenses by calling it a "safety issue. " "I want to know they have car insurance, that they know not to flee when they're getting pulled over or in an accident," she said. First, car insurance is not required to get a license.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Drivers who buy their car insurance through the Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund, the state's auto insurer of last resort, seem always to be the door mats of the State House, but that comparison might be too generous. Rugs get a little respect every once in a while. For years, we have groused that MAIF customers — and there are about 36,000 of them on any given day — are legally fleeced by premium finance companies. Under state law, MAIF must collect insurance premiums in advance, but since most customers don't have the money for a year's worth of coverage (on average, at a cost of about $1,800)
NEWS
March 15, 2012
My family and I moved to Maryland in 1996 and witnessed some of the lowest tax (and car insurance) rates ever. However, we did find the gasoline tax much higher than we'd experienced, but the roads were exquisite (and I'm not kidding). That's because we came from New Jersey. You have to have lived in the Garden State to understand why we are totally in favor of Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposed gas tax increase. Roads in New Jersey are still in the shape as we left them 16 years ago - horrid everywhere.
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