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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
General Motors Corp. announced Wednesday that it will continue to upgrade its Baltimore transmission plant, investing $23.5 million as it positions the facility to become a core part of its electric car business. The money is in addition to $246 million the company announced in January to equip the plant in White Marsh to build electric motors beginning in 2013. Plans are to build a 40,000-square-foot facility next to the site where workers now build transmissions, including some that go into hybrid vehicles.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Frank Anechiarico, a passionate car salesman and one-time owner of Baltimore County's Valley Chevrolet, died June 27 at Brightview Mays Chapel Ridge, an assisted-living facility. He was 91 and had suffered a stroke. "He started out selling used cars as a wholesaler, then worked his way up to be a dealer," said his son-in-law, Lloyd Haak, the general manager of Wantz Chevrolet in Taneytown, who met his future wife while working as a salesman for Mr. Anechiarico at Valley Chevrolet.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2001
James L. Dunbar Sr. remembers acting as both salesman and security guard for his start-up armored car company in Baltimore in the 1950s and 1960s. Most days, he'd meet with clients in the morning, then put on a uniform and a gun to provide those services with his sole armored car in the afternoon. "When I was 26, no one was going to knock me off," said Dunbar, now 71, in an interview last week. "I thought I would live forever." But as his company grew across the country in the 1980s, Dunbar started to plan for a time when he'd no longer be in charge.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Medical bills and other expenses strained Race Rudd Sr.'s finances, so replacing his broken-down car was beyond his means. In an imperfect arrangement, he relied on a friend to ferry him between his home in Odenton and his job as cook at the Hope House, a substance abuse treatment facility in Crownsville. One day, he told the head of the Anne Arundel County Food & Resource Bank, a Hope House neighbor where he picked up food for the treatment center, that he sure could use wheels.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | August 19, 1993
It all started 24 years ago with a new house, the need to make payments on it and a desire to provide for his family.Now, Frank E. Dimick is the Popeye's Restaurant Franchisee of the Year, as well as the developer of Melstone Valley in Eldersburg and the manager of Peddler's Square."
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | March 9, 1992
When James Dunbar started his armored truck business in 1956, he had three goals: build up his fleet to eight trucks, fly in a Boeing 707 and drive a Cadillac.He has long since met those goals, but the 62-year-old businessman continues to set new objectives. His Federal Armored Express Inc. is the fourth-largest armored truck company in America and growing fast.Recently, the company acquired about 75 routes from the nation's third-largest armored carrier, Loomis Armored Inc."I want to be No. 2," Mr. Dunbar said, who at least for now does not aspire to overtake Brink's Inc., the largest armored truck company in the business with 1,300 cars in 43 states.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Frank Anechiarico, a passionate car salesman and one-time owner of Baltimore County's Valley Chevrolet, died June 27 at Brightview Mays Chapel Ridge, an assisted-living facility. He was 91 and had suffered a stroke. "He started out selling used cars as a wholesaler, then worked his way up to be a dealer," said his son-in-law, Lloyd Haak, the general manager of Wantz Chevrolet in Taneytown, who met his future wife while working as a salesman for Mr. Anechiarico at Valley Chevrolet.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Fred Rasmussen and Sheridan Lyons and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1996
Edwin S. Rogers Sr., a retired Baltimore used-car dealer who was known as "Mr. Fix-it" because he did repair work for the poor and invalids, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Sunday at Sinai Hospital. He was 83.He had spent time Sunday installing a shower bar for an invalid man and fixing a woman's faucet.Mr. Rogers, a Pikesville resident, had also lived in Pompano Beach, Fla.He grew up on Whitelock Street and later moved to Northwest Baltimore. He graduated from the "A course" at the Polytechnic Institute in 1929.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 7, 1993
Would you buy a used car from this retailer?Circuit City Stores Inc., the giant home electronics chain, startled Wall Street, auto dealers and much of the retail world yesterday with an announcement that it was going into the used-car business.The news, tucked near the end of a news release detailing the company's financial results, overshadowed a 38 percent increase in profits in Circuit City's fiscal fourth quarter."I was a little surprised that the media picked up on that when we announced earnings that were above expectations and described our keymarkets and plans for expansion, all of which will have a big impact on our business," said Ann Collier, Circuit City's spokeswoman.
NEWS
December 14, 1993
Most businesses are loath to acknowledge problems in serving their audience. The auto industry, however, not only admits to its bad rep, it uses it for ad campaigns.A recent radio commercial for one car line, for example, measures the heartbeat of a fictitious patient when confronted with various stimuli. When a member of the opposite sex asks if the neighboring bar stool is available, the pulse quickens. When a pilot announces the engine has just fallen off the plane, the pulse races faster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | May 27, 2012
"Don't be a stranger" -- Peggy Olson I went to a wedding a few weeks ago, andĀ the conversation at my table, as it often does, turned to "Mad Men. " A few guests were very adamant about Season 5; "lackluster" and "disappointing" were the most commonly used words. I've been back and forth about this season, but have always thought there has been more good moments than bad. After last week's glaring misstep, I was getting worried. But tonight's beyond-excellent episode, which ranks right up there with episodesĀ "The Suitcase" and "Shut the Door.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
Maybe you've heard these phrases before: "If you have a phone, you have an attorney. " "You're making a big mistake. " "Nobody bothers me. " "Jack says 'Yes.'" For better or worse, these are the catchphrases of Baltimore advertising, lines delivered incessantly by TV pitchmen who, not coincidentally, own the businesses they're pitching. They're not actors, and they might not have the greatest voices in the world. But they certainly are one thing: everywhere. And they're definitely another thing: effective.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
General Motors Corp. announced Wednesday that it will continue to upgrade its Baltimore transmission plant, investing $23.5 million as it positions the facility to become a core part of its electric car business. The money is in addition to $246 million the company announced in January to equip the plant in White Marsh to build electric motors beginning in 2013. Plans are to build a 40,000-square-foot facility next to the site where workers now build transmissions, including some that go into hybrid vehicles.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
New cars sold to Marylanders hit their highest point in more than a year in September as the federal "cash for clunkers" program lured buyers into the showrooms. The Motor Vehicle Administration registered 26,992 new cars and light trucks in September. That was the most in one month since July 2008, when 29,188 were recorded. Last fall's financial collapse caused a plunge in consumer spending that sent some car manufacturers hurtling toward insolvency and gave dealers their worst year in more than a decade.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
The 4.2-acre used-car lot that Frank Saglimbeni wants to build doesn't seem outsized in this era of big-box stores, but to hundreds of residents who live near the bucolic 19th-century crossroads known as Daisy in far western Howard County, it's a monster. On a field where narrow, winding Daisy Road meets hilly, scenic Union Chapel Road in an unevenly aligned intersection, Saglimbeni plans to build a 3,850-square foot, two-story building and a lot for 155 vehicles on land that has been zoned for business for more than 50 years.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
It should be another favorable year for the U.S. auto industry, but there will be some bumps in the road. Auto analysts and industry officials see new-car sales remaining stable in Maryland and the nation, assuming there is no war in the Middle East. A conflict could reduce sales by as much as 6 percent, they said. Other predictions include: Labor talks leading to new contracts between the Big Three domestic automakers and the United Auto Workers union. A continuation of the generous incentives that boost new-car sales but cut into the profits of the automakers.
NEWS
August 5, 1994
For years consumers have been experiencing vertigo at the eyeball-popping sticker prices on automobiles in new car dealers' showrooms. Since 1989, new car prices have been rising well ahead of personal incomes, putting that dream machine out of reach of many prospective buyers.To avert a crippling slump in production, carmakers resorted to all sorts of novel schemes to keep sales up, including leasing. But now there are signs that the huge investment automakers have sunk into leasing arrangements may permanently alter the economics of the car business.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1996
Sales of both new and used cars in Maryland plunged 26 percent during December, and dealers and economists blamed the drop on the same weakness in consumer confidence that plagued other retailers during a sluggish Christmas season.Marylanders bought only 18,503 new cars in December, according to yesterday's figures from the state Motor Vehicle Administration. The performance was by far the worst in a year in which new car sales overall dipped 6.5 percent."This is a real step backward in the recovery," said Michael A. Conte, director of the Regional Economic Studies Program at the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2002
Samuel J. Zito, a sprightly centenarian who had operated Zito Buick Services in Baltimore for 40 years, died of respiratory failure Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 100. Mr. Zito, a 51-year resident of East Lake Avenue who would have been 101 next month, was born in Baltimore. One of seven children of Italian immigrant parents, he was raised on Pennsylvania Avenue, where his father owned a confectionery and fruit store. His entrepreneurial instincts began early, when he was delivering newspapers at the age of 6. He swept the floors of a barbershop after school for 50 cents a week, and as a 14-year-old delivered singing telegrams for Western Union.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2001
James L. Dunbar Sr. remembers acting as both salesman and security guard for his start-up armored car company in Baltimore in the 1950s and 1960s. Most days, he'd meet with clients in the morning, then put on a uniform and a gun to provide those services with his sole armored car in the afternoon. "When I was 26, no one was going to knock me off," said Dunbar, now 71, in an interview last week. "I thought I would live forever." But as his company grew across the country in the 1980s, Dunbar started to plan for a time when he'd no longer be in charge.
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