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Captain Kangaroo

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NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1990
CINCINNATI -- A former songwriter for "Captain Kangaroo" told jurors in the Robert Mapplethorpe obscenity trial yesterday that the photographer's sexually explicit works should not be displayed in museums because they promote sadomasochism and sexual abuse of children.Mass media analyst Judith Reisman was permitted to testify in the case against the Contemporary Arts Center and director Dennis Barrie over the objections of defense attorneys, who challenged her ability to evaluate either art or obscenity.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
I remember my early childhood in black and white. Maybe it's because I'm a baby boomer who watched a lot of television. That's why when I think about Captain Kangaroo and his bristly mustache, his Treasure House set, his friends Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans, I see it all in black and white. By the time color television was commonplace, I had pretty much stopped watching. But those grainy memories of perching daily before the glowing screen in the mid-to-late 1950s are woven into the fabric of my life.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 24, 2004
Bob Keeshan, who for 30 years played television's Captain Kangaroo, trading knock-knock jokes with a moose puppet while introducing morals and civility to countless children, died yesterday at 76. Mr. Keeshan's death in Hartford, Vt., followed a long illness, according to a statement released by his son, Michael. Although Fred Rogers, who died last year, is often considered the father of children's television, Mr. Keeshan preceded him on U.S. national TV by 13 years, debuting on CBS in 1955 as an avuncular character with a walrus mustache, Buster Brown wig, baggy jacket and beloved gaggle of Treasure House friends.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 24, 2004
Bob Keeshan, who for 30 years played television's Captain Kangaroo, trading knock-knock jokes with a moose puppet while introducing morals and civility to countless children, died yesterday at 76. Mr. Keeshan's death in Hartford, Vt., followed a long illness, according to a statement released by his son, Michael. Although Fred Rogers, who died last year, is often considered the father of children's television, Mr. Keeshan preceded him on U.S. national TV by 13 years, debuting on CBS in 1955 as an avuncular character with a walrus mustache, Buster Brown wig, baggy jacket and beloved gaggle of Treasure House friends.
FEATURES
By John Barry and John Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
The generation that Captain Kangaroo taught self-respect and empathy has let the big guy down.Thirty-nine years after Bob Keeshan brought his famous gentle whimsy to CBS -- imparting values of trust and mutual caring and affection through his associations with Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans -- the Captain is shocked at how things have turned out. The generation he nurtured has not done nearly as well by its own progeny.In much the same terms expressed lately by disheartened baby-care guru Dr. Benjamin Spock, Mr. Keeshan says he sees American children as worse off today than they were when he debuted as Captain Kangaroo in 1955.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Bob Keeshan, television's veteran Captain Kangaroo, returns to Western Maryland College tomorrow for a speech of the millennium.It's part of "A Day of Illumination" at the campus and the kickoff of a $40 million fund-raising drive to the year 2000. The day concludes with Carroll County's first laser show.Keeshan's address, "Defining Lessons," will be at 2 p.m. in Baker Memorial Chapel. Programs on technology and education will follow in the academic buildings. The laser show will be in the Gill Center at 8: 45 p.m. The events are free.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
I remember my early childhood in black and white. Maybe it's because I'm a baby boomer who watched a lot of television. That's why when I think about Captain Kangaroo and his bristly mustache, his Treasure House set, his friends Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans, I see it all in black and white. By the time color television was commonplace, I had pretty much stopped watching. But those grainy memories of perching daily before the glowing screen in the mid-to-late 1950s are woven into the fabric of my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 31, 1996
Captain KangarooMeet the man who brightened your mornings with his cheerful personalities and characters. Bob Keeshan, better known as "Captain Kangaroo," is coming to Borders Books & Music on Sunday to sign copies of his new book, "Good Morning Captain: 50 Wonderful Years With Bob Keeshan, TV's Captain Kangaroo."The Captain brought characters such as Bunny Rabbit, Mister Moose and Grandfather Clock to generations of children. His book offers an extensive photo history and intimate look at the career of the man behind the Captain.
NEWS
May 19, 1996
America's favorite captain of the airwaves, Bob Keeshan, better known as Captain Kangaroo, will be among the guests honored at Western Maryland College's 126th commencement at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Gill Physical Education Learning Center.Known simply as "the Captain" to millions of baby boomers who grew up with his daily show for children, Keeshan will be joined by television journalist Roger Mudd as they receive honorary degrees in recognition of their contributions to society.Keeshan, also known for creating Clarabell the Clown on "Howdy Doody" and playing the role from 1948 to 1953, opened the doors to his Treasure House as Captain Kangaroo on CBS-TV in 1955.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
A retired general, as in Powell, and a retired captain, as in Kangaroo, were among the commencement speakers yesterday as more than 1,700 graduates received degrees at five Maryland colleges."
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | December 29, 1996
ALTHOUGH HUMBLED EARLY by the Blizzard of '96, this year turned out to be bountiful on Maryland's social scene for those who like to hobnob with community movers and shakers and scope celebrities. In some cases, stargazers didn't even have to be at a party; they may have been lucky enough to see their favorite celebrity at a local restaurant or boutique.January, February, MarchThe fetes included a Snow Ball at Harford Mall for the Patrick Hart Foundation. ... Lighthouse and flowerpot hats accessorized black-tie garb at the 10th Madhatter's Ball at L'Hirondelle Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 31, 1996
Captain KangarooMeet the man who brightened your mornings with his cheerful personalities and characters. Bob Keeshan, better known as "Captain Kangaroo," is coming to Borders Books & Music on Sunday to sign copies of his new book, "Good Morning Captain: 50 Wonderful Years With Bob Keeshan, TV's Captain Kangaroo."The Captain brought characters such as Bunny Rabbit, Mister Moose and Grandfather Clock to generations of children. His book offers an extensive photo history and intimate look at the career of the man behind the Captain.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Bob Keeshan, television's veteran Captain Kangaroo, returns to Western Maryland College tomorrow for a speech of the millennium.It's part of "A Day of Illumination" at the campus and the kickoff of a $40 million fund-raising drive to the year 2000. The day concludes with Carroll County's first laser show.Keeshan's address, "Defining Lessons," will be at 2 p.m. in Baker Memorial Chapel. Programs on technology and education will follow in the academic buildings. The laser show will be in the Gill Center at 8: 45 p.m. The events are free.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
A retired general, as in Powell, and a retired captain, as in Kangaroo, were among the commencement speakers yesterday as more than 1,700 graduates received degrees at five Maryland colleges."
NEWS
May 19, 1996
America's favorite captain of the airwaves, Bob Keeshan, better known as Captain Kangaroo, will be among the guests honored at Western Maryland College's 126th commencement at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Gill Physical Education Learning Center.Known simply as "the Captain" to millions of baby boomers who grew up with his daily show for children, Keeshan will be joined by television journalist Roger Mudd as they receive honorary degrees in recognition of their contributions to society.Keeshan, also known for creating Clarabell the Clown on "Howdy Doody" and playing the role from 1948 to 1953, opened the doors to his Treasure House as Captain Kangaroo on CBS-TV in 1955.
FEATURES
By John Barry and John Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
The generation that Captain Kangaroo taught self-respect and empathy has let the big guy down.Thirty-nine years after Bob Keeshan brought his famous gentle whimsy to CBS -- imparting values of trust and mutual caring and affection through his associations with Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans -- the Captain is shocked at how things have turned out. The generation he nurtured has not done nearly as well by its own progeny.In much the same terms expressed lately by disheartened baby-care guru Dr. Benjamin Spock, Mr. Keeshan says he sees American children as worse off today than they were when he debuted as Captain Kangaroo in 1955.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | December 29, 1996
ALTHOUGH HUMBLED EARLY by the Blizzard of '96, this year turned out to be bountiful on Maryland's social scene for those who like to hobnob with community movers and shakers and scope celebrities. In some cases, stargazers didn't even have to be at a party; they may have been lucky enough to see their favorite celebrity at a local restaurant or boutique.January, February, MarchThe fetes included a Snow Ball at Harford Mall for the Patrick Hart Foundation. ... Lighthouse and flowerpot hats accessorized black-tie garb at the 10th Madhatter's Ball at L'Hirondelle Club.
NEWS
March 26, 2010
When Captain Kangaroo told our young sons to share their toys, they shared their toys. When Tony the Tiger told them that Frosted Flakes were GREAT, you'd better believe there was a box of Frosted Flakes in our grocery bag that week. There is no mystery to the incivility over the health care bill. It began in Congress, with mean-spirited, and sometimes hateful rhetoric. I'm an ordinary senior citizen who does not pretend to understand the details of the health care bill. I'm also a mother, grandmother and former teacher, who is appalled by would-be statesmen, whose behavior in Congress would be unacceptable in our classrooms.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1990
CINCINNATI -- A former songwriter for "Captain Kangaroo" told jurors in the Robert Mapplethorpe obscenity trial yesterday that the photographer's sexually explicit works should not be displayed in museums because they promote sadomasochism and sexual abuse of children.Mass media analyst Judith Reisman was permitted to testify in the case against the Contemporary Arts Center and director Dennis Barrie over the objections of defense attorneys, who challenged her ability to evaluate either art or obscenity.
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