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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
This being summer, Baltimore's Young Victorian Theatre Company is reveling in the glories of Gilbert and Sullivan. This year's production of 'H.M.S. Pinafore' got Midweek Madness thinking about this sequence from a "Peter Pan" cartoon that finds Captain Hook breezing through the score to the operetta in one minute.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Early on in "Peter and the Starcatcher," the ingenious and brilliantly performed play now at the Hippodrome, there's a flashback to a grim orphanage in England where the boy who will become Peter Pan by the end of the show endures brutal treatment. As the ugly business is reenacted, a voice softly emerges amid the din from a corner of the stage, singing the opening lines of a work from the mid-19th century by Felix Mendelssohn, a work that Victorians loved: "O for the wings, for the wings of a dove, far away, far away would I rove.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 1, 1998
There have been several theatrical versions of James M. Barrie's classic "Peter Pan" lately. London's Royal National Theatre has a large-scale, four-hour extravaganza narrated by Alec McCowen and starring Ian McKellen as Captain Hook. And in Los Angeles, an avant-garde, Obie Award-winning adaptation called "Peter and Wendy" interprets the bond between that pair as a reflection of Barrie's relationship with his mother, whose grief over the accidental death of James' older brother led James to fill in as the "lost boy" in her affections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
This being summer, Baltimore's Young Victorian Theatre Company is reveling in the glories of Gilbert and Sullivan. This year's production of 'H.M.S. Pinafore' got Midweek Madness thinking about this sequence from a "Peter Pan" cartoon that finds Captain Hook breezing through the score to the operetta in one minute.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 2002
With Moonlight Troupers' current production of Peter Pan, director Robert F. Kauffman closes his 31-year theatrical career on the highest possible note. The musical by Mark Charlap, Carolyn Leigh, Jule Styne, Betty Comden and Adolph Green not only retains its pixyish charm but acquires added zing in the Moonlighters' production now at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. Amazingly professional for a college production, this Peter Pan is top-flight entertainment.
NEWS
By Joann Greenfield and Benjamin Greenfield and Joann Greenfield and Benjamin Greenfield,Contributing writers | November 15, 1991
Editor's note: Joann is a 6-year-old first-grader at Cape St. ClaireElementary who enjoys drawing, dancing and playing tic-tac-toe. She tolerates occasional trips to Tower Records with her father, Phil, who reviews the performing arts for the Anne Arundel County Sun. Her brother, Benjamin, a 5-year-old kindergartner, prefers to stay home andwatch the Marx Brothers while wearing his Mickey Mouse ears.We really like Peter Pan. We have the movie of the "real" Peter Pan and we got the cartoon one out of the video store.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 1998
There's a new cog in the gears of the Talent Machine and, thanks to her, director Bobbi Smith's production of "Peter Pan" is running very smoothly indeed.She is Ally Lichtenfeld, a 14-year-old who studies at the Park School outside Baltimore and at Peabody's Preparatory Division. She plays Peter and is wonderful.Ally is the picture of poise on stage. She flies through the air gracefully in her unobtrusive "Inventorprises" harness, re-creating James M. Barrie's timeless fantasy anew with each aerodynamic twist.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 9, 1997
J. M. Barrie's classic 1904 play, "Peter Pan," need not necessarily be just for kids. But the production at Olney Theatre Center essentially is.Although the play has some intriguing adult themes -- intriguing enough to have had psychological syndromes named for them -- Olney's production just hasn't grown up. Director Jim Petosa seems to have cartoons in mind, not literature, judging from the overly broad portrayals he elicits from most of the pirates, not...
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
From operating on Dwight D. Eisenhower's in-grown toenail to pirating in the Inner Harbor, Dr. John Charlton, 69, has led a uniformed, if not uniform, life. He was a young podiatrist in the Army when called upon to examine President Eisenhower, and eventually Charlton and his wife Gloria became good buddies with Mamie, Ike's wife. After the Army, Charlton donned clown's togs as a potentate in the Shriners. And now, he is Captain Hook, tour guide aboard the Peter Pan Pirate Ship Baltimore, an amphibious vehicle that takes tourists on Baltimore streets and in the harbor as part of a historic tour program run by the Living Classrooms Foundation.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 2002
Technically, only the first and last scenes of Peter Pan take place in a nursery. But one of the most ingenious things about Center Stage's entrancing production is that it situates the entire play there. When Captain Hook makes his entrance, he's riding in a sedan chair made of two huge, stacked building blocks. When the Lost Boys build a home for Wendy, they string up sheets like a child's bedroom fort. And when the pirates chain their child-prisoners together, they use a yellow jump rope.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ian Zelaya | November 26, 2012
After a two-week break, our favorite fairytale drama is back and luckily things have changed. Aside from the premiere, "Into the Deep" has been the only episode this season to not have character flashbacks. This was great in terms of plot momentum and I hope it continues because it will make my recaps less complicated to write. The Walking Dead Remember that giant beanstalk where Emma left Captain Hook to rot? We find out Hook made it out alive, except Cora is not happy with him. She doesn't have time for Hook's games and accuses him of betrayal, saying that she'll have to complete her journey to Storybrooke alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts, Sarah Kickler Kelber, Mary Carole McCauley, Rashod D. Ollison, Tim Smith and Michael Sragow | January 22, 2009
POP MUSIC Truckers tour Drive-By Truckers hail from Athens, Ga., and sport a sound that melds brash Southern hard rock with erudite lyrics. The band's style deepens on its latest album, the solid Brighter Than Creation's Dark, released early last year. The band performs tomorrow at Recher Theatre, 512 York Road, Towson. Tickets are $25. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com. FILM 'Hook' The Rotunda Cinematheque is presenting a free showing at 10 a.m. Saturday of Hook, Steven Spielberg's 1991 movie about a grown-up Peter Pan (Robin Williams)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 2002
With Moonlight Troupers' current production of Peter Pan, director Robert F. Kauffman closes his 31-year theatrical career on the highest possible note. The musical by Mark Charlap, Carolyn Leigh, Jule Styne, Betty Comden and Adolph Green not only retains its pixyish charm but acquires added zing in the Moonlighters' production now at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. Amazingly professional for a college production, this Peter Pan is top-flight entertainment.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 2002
Technically, only the first and last scenes of Peter Pan take place in a nursery. But one of the most ingenious things about Center Stage's entrancing production is that it situates the entire play there. When Captain Hook makes his entrance, he's riding in a sedan chair made of two huge, stacked building blocks. When the Lost Boys build a home for Wendy, they string up sheets like a child's bedroom fort. And when the pirates chain their child-prisoners together, they use a yellow jump rope.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
From operating on Dwight D. Eisenhower's in-grown toenail to pirating in the Inner Harbor, Dr. John Charlton, 69, has led a uniformed, if not uniform, life. He was a young podiatrist in the Army when called upon to examine President Eisenhower, and eventually Charlton and his wife Gloria became good buddies with Mamie, Ike's wife. After the Army, Charlton donned clown's togs as a potentate in the Shriners. And now, he is Captain Hook, tour guide aboard the Peter Pan Pirate Ship Baltimore, an amphibious vehicle that takes tourists on Baltimore streets and in the harbor as part of a historic tour program run by the Living Classrooms Foundation.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 1998
There's a new cog in the gears of the Talent Machine and, thanks to her, director Bobbi Smith's production of "Peter Pan" is running very smoothly indeed.She is Ally Lichtenfeld, a 14-year-old who studies at the Park School outside Baltimore and at Peabody's Preparatory Division. She plays Peter and is wonderful.Ally is the picture of poise on stage. She flies through the air gracefully in her unobtrusive "Inventorprises" harness, re-creating James M. Barrie's timeless fantasy anew with each aerodynamic twist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Early on in "Peter and the Starcatcher," the ingenious and brilliantly performed play now at the Hippodrome, there's a flashback to a grim orphanage in England where the boy who will become Peter Pan by the end of the show endures brutal treatment. As the ugly business is reenacted, a voice softly emerges amid the din from a corner of the stage, singing the opening lines of a work from the mid-19th century by Felix Mendelssohn, a work that Victorians loved: "O for the wings, for the wings of a dove, far away, far away would I rove.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts, Sarah Kickler Kelber, Mary Carole McCauley, Rashod D. Ollison, Tim Smith and Michael Sragow | January 22, 2009
POP MUSIC Truckers tour Drive-By Truckers hail from Athens, Ga., and sport a sound that melds brash Southern hard rock with erudite lyrics. The band's style deepens on its latest album, the solid Brighter Than Creation's Dark, released early last year. The band performs tomorrow at Recher Theatre, 512 York Road, Towson. Tickets are $25. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com. FILM 'Hook' The Rotunda Cinematheque is presenting a free showing at 10 a.m. Saturday of Hook, Steven Spielberg's 1991 movie about a grown-up Peter Pan (Robin Williams)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 1, 1998
There have been several theatrical versions of James M. Barrie's classic "Peter Pan" lately. London's Royal National Theatre has a large-scale, four-hour extravaganza narrated by Alec McCowen and starring Ian McKellen as Captain Hook. And in Los Angeles, an avant-garde, Obie Award-winning adaptation called "Peter and Wendy" interprets the bond between that pair as a reflection of Barrie's relationship with his mother, whose grief over the accidental death of James' older brother led James to fill in as the "lost boy" in her affections.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 9, 1997
J. M. Barrie's classic 1904 play, "Peter Pan," need not necessarily be just for kids. But the production at Olney Theatre Center essentially is.Although the play has some intriguing adult themes -- intriguing enough to have had psychological syndromes named for them -- Olney's production just hasn't grown up. Director Jim Petosa seems to have cartoons in mind, not literature, judging from the overly broad portrayals he elicits from most of the pirates, not...
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