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By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 21, 2006
The winter solstice arrives about 7:25 p.m. today, marking the official beginning of winter for the northern hemisphere (summer in the south). It's the moment when the sun hangs directly over the Tropic of Capricorn (23.5 degrees south of the equator), the southernmost point in its annual cycle. This is also the shortest day of the year. From here on, our daylight hours get a bit longer each day, and spring - any cold and ice and snow to come notwithstanding - becomes a bit more plausible.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Jen Bem | March 1, 2010
Here is your astrological forecast for Monday, March 1, courtesy of your resident scopetress Jen Bem. Pisces 02.19-03.20 Tell the truth this afternoon, no matter who is confronting you. If you try to cover with a lie, you'll prolong the consequences and make things worse. Aries 03.21-04.19 It may be Monday, but that doesn't mean you're not already stressed about the week ahead. The sun will help you see that life doesn't suck as much as you thought. Taurus 04.20-05.20 Enjoy time with your honey this afternoon.
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NEWS
April 25, 2006
Phil Walden, 66, the Capricorn Records founder who launched the careers of Otis Redding and the Allman Brothers Band, died Sunday in Atlanta after a long battle with cancer, his family said yesterday. The Macon, Ga.-based record label, founded in 1969, was influential in bringing together rock, country and blues artists who crafted a new style exemplified by groups like the Allmans and the Charlie Daniels Band, another act discovered by Mr. Walden. "Phil was a visionary," said Chuck Leavell, who joined the Allman Brothers on keyboards in 1972 and now plays with the Rolling Stones.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Reading as a source of love, mystery and terror - that's the laudable subject of the young-adult fantasy Inkheart, based on Cornelia Funke's engaging international best-seller about a man who can release characters from the page simply by reading aloud. Cold, bland and gimmicky - that's how the movie has turned out. On-screen the plot proves murky rather than intriguing. Brendan Fraser plays a guy named Mo, a loving father and regular fellow except for his profession. Mo is a "book doctor," an expert at repairing bindings, covers and pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | October 7, 2001
The president's message is clear: Americans need to go places and buy stuff. Since Sept. 11, even the daily horoscope has assumed a decidedly patriotic and commercial tone. Read on -- it's your civic duty: Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Pursue your talents with a new burst of energy. Note Southwest Airlines' deliciously low fares through this month. Check out the Big Lots store in Dundalk. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Take charge of your own destiny. Lucky situations involve the artistic world.
FEATURES
November 14, 1990
You may win a world atlas by correctly answering these questions, provided by Geostat Map & Travel Center in the Gallery at Harborplace. Drop your entries off at the store by Nov. 30, or mail to Geostat, 200 E. Pratt St., Baltimore, Md. 21202.A random drawing will select the winning entry from all the correct ones. Look for the answers in the Today section in early December.1. Which city is farthest north: Toronto, Minneapolis or Paris?2. Which is farther south: Madrid or Philadelphia?3. Which U.S. state has the longest coastline?
NEWS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
LOS ANGELES - It's an early Thursday afternoon, and the world's most widely read astrologer is busy divining the future. Lying in bed with his head propped up on pillows, Sydney Omarr, blinded and paralyzed from the neck down by multiple sclerosis, waits for a cue from his editorial adviser, Capricorn Valerie Barbeaux. Seated before an old Selectric II typewriter prepped with a blank sheet and carbon paper, Barbeaux says, "Syd, this is for Friday, December 6, moon in Capricorn. Aries."
NEWS
April 29, 2004
Martin A. Schwemmer, a retired chief ship's engineer who sailed for Bethlehem Steel Corp., died of cancer Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised on East Eager Street, Mr. Schwemmer graduated from the old St. James the Less Parochial School at Aisquith and Eager streets. During World War II, he served in the merchant marine aboard Liberty Ships in the Atlantic and Pacific. He then joined Bethlehem Steel and became chief engineer on the Bethtex and Bethflor.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Reading as a source of love, mystery and terror - that's the laudable subject of the young-adult fantasy Inkheart, based on Cornelia Funke's engaging international best-seller about a man who can release characters from the page simply by reading aloud. Cold, bland and gimmicky - that's how the movie has turned out. On-screen the plot proves murky rather than intriguing. Brendan Fraser plays a guy named Mo, a loving father and regular fellow except for his profession. Mo is a "book doctor," an expert at repairing bindings, covers and pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
Jen Bem | March 1, 2010
Here is your astrological forecast for Monday, March 1, courtesy of your resident scopetress Jen Bem. Pisces 02.19-03.20 Tell the truth this afternoon, no matter who is confronting you. If you try to cover with a lie, you'll prolong the consequences and make things worse. Aries 03.21-04.19 It may be Monday, but that doesn't mean you're not already stressed about the week ahead. The sun will help you see that life doesn't suck as much as you thought. Taurus 04.20-05.20 Enjoy time with your honey this afternoon.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 21, 2006
The winter solstice arrives about 7:25 p.m. today, marking the official beginning of winter for the northern hemisphere (summer in the south). It's the moment when the sun hangs directly over the Tropic of Capricorn (23.5 degrees south of the equator), the southernmost point in its annual cycle. This is also the shortest day of the year. From here on, our daylight hours get a bit longer each day, and spring - any cold and ice and snow to come notwithstanding - becomes a bit more plausible.
NEWS
April 25, 2006
Phil Walden, 66, the Capricorn Records founder who launched the careers of Otis Redding and the Allman Brothers Band, died Sunday in Atlanta after a long battle with cancer, his family said yesterday. The Macon, Ga.-based record label, founded in 1969, was influential in bringing together rock, country and blues artists who crafted a new style exemplified by groups like the Allmans and the Charlie Daniels Band, another act discovered by Mr. Walden. "Phil was a visionary," said Chuck Leavell, who joined the Allman Brothers on keyboards in 1972 and now plays with the Rolling Stones.
NEWS
April 29, 2004
Martin A. Schwemmer, a retired chief ship's engineer who sailed for Bethlehem Steel Corp., died of cancer Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised on East Eager Street, Mr. Schwemmer graduated from the old St. James the Less Parochial School at Aisquith and Eager streets. During World War II, he served in the merchant marine aboard Liberty Ships in the Atlantic and Pacific. He then joined Bethlehem Steel and became chief engineer on the Bethtex and Bethflor.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2003
Today is Dec. 1, late autumn in the year 2003. Or is it? Like so many concepts of time, it depends on your perspective. If we were in Saudi Arabia, the official Islamic Calendar would say today is the sixth day of Shawwal, the 10th month in the Islamic lunar year. And the year is 1424, not 2003. Elsewhere, the Hindu, Hebrew or Chinese calendars might well prevail. Our own Gregorian calendar is the most widely used today, but it has changed over time, too. The name December, for example, is derived from the Latin decem, for 10. It was the 10th month of the year until the first century BC, when Julius Caesar inserted July and August.
NEWS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
LOS ANGELES - It's an early Thursday afternoon, and the world's most widely read astrologer is busy divining the future. Lying in bed with his head propped up on pillows, Sydney Omarr, blinded and paralyzed from the neck down by multiple sclerosis, waits for a cue from his editorial adviser, Capricorn Valerie Barbeaux. Seated before an old Selectric II typewriter prepped with a blank sheet and carbon paper, Barbeaux says, "Syd, this is for Friday, December 6, moon in Capricorn. Aries."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | October 7, 2001
The president's message is clear: Americans need to go places and buy stuff. Since Sept. 11, even the daily horoscope has assumed a decidedly patriotic and commercial tone. Read on -- it's your civic duty: Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Pursue your talents with a new burst of energy. Note Southwest Airlines' deliciously low fares through this month. Check out the Big Lots store in Dundalk. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Take charge of your own destiny. Lucky situations involve the artistic world.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2003
Today is Dec. 1, late autumn in the year 2003. Or is it? Like so many concepts of time, it depends on your perspective. If we were in Saudi Arabia, the official Islamic Calendar would say today is the sixth day of Shawwal, the 10th month in the Islamic lunar year. And the year is 1424, not 2003. Elsewhere, the Hindu, Hebrew or Chinese calendars might well prevail. Our own Gregorian calendar is the most widely used today, but it has changed over time, too. The name December, for example, is derived from the Latin decem, for 10. It was the 10th month of the year until the first century BC, when Julius Caesar inserted July and August.
NEWS
By Rena Singer and Rena Singer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2000
XAKANAXA, Botswana - The last time Molly Bruce Jacobs saw her son alive, she tucked him into bed, gave him a kiss and reminded him not to leave his tent during the night. It had been a full day, their second on safari in the Moremi Wildlife Reserve. With scrub-covered islands in 1,860 square miles of swamp, the park offers visitors some of the best game-viewing opportunities in southern Africa. It had drawn Jacobs and her son Mark Garrity Shea, known as Garrit, from Stevenson in Baltimore County, full of excitement and wonder.
FEATURES
November 14, 1990
You may win a world atlas by correctly answering these questions, provided by Geostat Map & Travel Center in the Gallery at Harborplace. Drop your entries off at the store by Nov. 30, or mail to Geostat, 200 E. Pratt St., Baltimore, Md. 21202.A random drawing will select the winning entry from all the correct ones. Look for the answers in the Today section in early December.1. Which city is farthest north: Toronto, Minneapolis or Paris?2. Which is farther south: Madrid or Philadelphia?3. Which U.S. state has the longest coastline?
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