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By Joanne E. Morvay | May 31, 2000
Item: General Foods Cappuccino Coolers What you get: 6 one-serving packets Cost: About $2.25 Preparation time: Stir and serve Review: Last summer, on forays into coffee bars, I became addicted to flavored iced coffee. When I saw General Foods' mixes for "Sweetened Instant Iced Cappuccino," I wondered if one could duplicate the same great taste at home. With friends, I tried the French Vanilla and Chocolate flavors. I thought the French Vanilla was dead-on, with the right mix of coffee and milk, as did a few others.
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By Janet Gilbert and Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2009
Lately, I haven't been able to enjoy my preferred International Coffee moment in the afternoon, and I'm getting a little cranky. I like a particular flavor called Orange Cappuccino. It lacks that freshly ground aroma and isn't particularly citrus-y, nor does it have the foamy head of a true European cappuccino, but what can I say? My pedestrian tastes find it pleasing. I always have some on hand so that I can trick myself into experiencing what the commercials promise: a cosmopolitan me, sitting on my fashionable tuchis at a sidewalk cafe with a nice cup of pick-me-up.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | November 23, 1992
A fill-up and a cappuccino amaretto? An oil change and an espresso to go?John Englehart, owner of J&B's Texaco on Ritchie Highway, couldn't see it at first. Still, he was intrigued by the idea that Jean Henderson pitched to him one day: a drive-up espresso stand at his Glen Burnie gas station.So intrigued, in fact, that he agreed to let the budding entrepreneur, a 60-year-old retiree, open KC's Expresso in a 5-by-8-foot construction shack on his lot.At first, Mr. Englehart recalled, "I kind of went, 'What?
NEWS
June 10, 2004
WITH THE school year ending, it's an opportune time to grade Baltimore. Let's see. There are the close-knit neighborhoods, the world-class medical centers, the robust arts community, the burgeoning waterfront and, of course, the eccentric characters. But did you know that there are people who would measure this city's stature by counting up Starbucks? Starbucks! We're losing points on coffeehouses. So that's Baltimore's problem. And here we were thinking it was the desperate Krispy Kreme doughnut shortage.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1998
Governors gossiped over cups of watery coffee. Lobbyists finessed bills over cheese crackers. Senators fortified themselves for long voting sessions with hot dogs.Over the years, even though it had all the charm and selection of a gas station shop, the dingy canteen in the basement of the Maryland State House became one of its most popular hangouts.But today, the historic Capitol's hole-in-the-wall boasts a new attraction: a menu."It's yuppified!" exclaimed Joe Wyatt, 38, a lobbyist for the Association of Maryland Pilots, as he bought a soft drink one recent afternoon.
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,Dallas Morning News | March 31, 1993
Indulging in a coffee fantasy sounds marvelous, but you might not be ready to invest in an espresso maker, steamer and coffee grinder.Instant and ready-made products simulate the new coffee drinks without the appliance headaches.New choices include General Foods' Cappio, a bottled iced cappuccino containing coffee, milk and sweetener. It comes in four-packs of individual servings or in 24-ounce bottles. Maxwell House offers Instant Cappuccino, a powdered coffee that produces a frothy top when hot water is added.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | June 20, 1993
Aprons are hot fashion, but the new models won't be hovering over a hot stove. Today's aprons are worn by free-spirited young things who see them as quaint designs rather than symbols of domestic drudgery. Aprons now go out to dance or sip iced cappuccino at the cafe. They're a fresh look that works best on women too young to remember a world without microwave cookery.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 21, 1994
What has four wheels, a motor, a refrigerator and a sink?Throw in a green umbrella and you have Jamie L. Jones' espresso and cappuccino stand at the corner of Calvert and Fayette streets.Ms. Jones, an aspiring actress who has put her waitressing experience to entrepreneurial use, set up the black-and-red stand outside the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse about two weeks ago. Her partner in the venture is Peter Winer, a financial planner.The idea for the cart came about six months ago when Mr. Winer went to Seattle and saw espresso stands everywhere he went.
NEWS
By Shape magazine | February 16, 2003
A 20-ounce mocha drink from Starbucks (with whole milk and whipped cream) is 510 calories. Add a muffin and you've got a 900- to 1,000-calorie snack. For an average-size woman, that represents more than half the recommended number of daily calories. (For an average-size man, it's just about half the daily calories.) A more calorie-conserving choice is a Starbucks 16-ounce nonfat cappuccino (only 110 calories) and a biscotto. The calorie total: 210.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | December 27, 1998
Fashion houses have renamed our colors, making plain old green a more stylish-sounding celadon, turning brown into cappuccino, changing white to stone.So that sweater you got from Aunt Betty for Christmas just isn't your color and you want to exchange it. OK, but first you've got to figure out what color this color that's not your color actually is.Green? Not a chance. If it's out of this year's Eddie Bauer catalog, it could be celadon. Or basil. Or alpine green, dark pine, cactus, mallard, juniper, dark spruce or thyme.
NEWS
By Shape magazine | February 16, 2003
A 20-ounce mocha drink from Starbucks (with whole milk and whipped cream) is 510 calories. Add a muffin and you've got a 900- to 1,000-calorie snack. For an average-size woman, that represents more than half the recommended number of daily calories. (For an average-size man, it's just about half the daily calories.) A more calorie-conserving choice is a Starbucks 16-ounce nonfat cappuccino (only 110 calories) and a biscotto. The calorie total: 210.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
Westminster's Main Street is about to get a java jolt. The Pour House Cafe is ready to serve a cuppa joe in a colorful, family-friendly environment. It's wired for the Web, it's a gallery for local artists and the owners plan to share some of their proceeds with local charities. "It'll make a distinct impact on this community," said Sandy Oxx, head of the Carroll County Arts Council, one of the organizations that is to benefit from donations from the coffee shop, scheduled to celebrate its grand opening today.
TRAVEL
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | February 11, 2001
In summer, St. Michaels on the Eastern Shore is charming. Boutiques, antiques shops and galleries are festooned with flowers. Restaurants waft the enticing aromas of steamed crabs and fresh-baked bread. And the tall-masted sailboats called Chesapeake Bay log canoes parade like elegant Victorian ladies as they race around the buoys in the Miles River. It's charming, all right, but it's also crowded. You can barely find walking space on the sidewalks, let alone a place to park. Getting a meal -- or even a cappuccino -- usually requires a wait.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | May 31, 2000
Item: General Foods Cappuccino Coolers What you get: 6 one-serving packets Cost: About $2.25 Preparation time: Stir and serve Review: Last summer, on forays into coffee bars, I became addicted to flavored iced coffee. When I saw General Foods' mixes for "Sweetened Instant Iced Cappuccino," I wondered if one could duplicate the same great taste at home. With friends, I tried the French Vanilla and Chocolate flavors. I thought the French Vanilla was dead-on, with the right mix of coffee and milk, as did a few others.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
HANOVER, Pa. -- It was shortly after dawn, and the three men trudged across crusty snow with makeshift sleds piled with fishing gear, onto the frozen surface of Lake Marburg. They cut holes in the ice with gas-powered augers. Dropped baited hooks into the water. Sat on plastic buckets. Hoped a walleye would bite. The wait began. On these waters, time is measured by the movement of shadows. A rise in temperature is heard more than felt -- the warmer the day, the more the ice cracks. "It can get pretty spooky when that ice cracks beneath your feet, especially at night," said Ken Chilcoat, a carpenter with more than a decade of experience in the chilly sport of ice fishing.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | December 27, 1998
Fashion houses have renamed our colors, making plain old green a more stylish-sounding celadon, turning brown into cappuccino, changing white to stone.So that sweater you got from Aunt Betty for Christmas just isn't your color and you want to exchange it. OK, but first you've got to figure out what color this color that's not your color actually is.Green? Not a chance. If it's out of this year's Eddie Bauer catalog, it could be celadon. Or basil. Or alpine green, dark pine, cactus, mallard, juniper, dark spruce or thyme.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg 6 | September 12, 1991
As a group of young men stood on a Pimlico street corner yesterday peering into a bag containing nearly $1 million worth of cocaine, they were apparently so impressed with their merchandise they failed to notice who was looking over their shoulders.Three men -- wearing dress shirts, ties and jackets -- with an equal interest in the contents of the bag listened for a while at the corner of Woodland and Delaware avenues as the group of about 20 young men admired their cocaine stash.When they had heard enough, the three men identified themselves as police officers.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 30, 1995
THE WAITRESS was in her early 20s, with a pinched face and an attitude that suggested she was the logical successor to Meryl Streep in terms of pure talent, but for now had to keep this crummy job waiting on tables.When she finally sauntered over to take my order, I said: "Cup of coffee, please.""Hazelnut, amaretto, French vanilla . . ." she began."Just a regular coffee," I said.". . . Swiss mocha, Dutch chocolate, butter rum . . .""No, a regular coffee," I said.". . . Macadamia nut, maple walnut, Irish cream . . ."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1998
Governors gossiped over cups of watery coffee. Lobbyists finessed bills over cheese crackers. Senators fortified themselves for long voting sessions with hot dogs.Over the years, even though it had all the charm and selection of a gas station shop, the dingy canteen in the basement of the Maryland State House became one of its most popular hangouts.But today, the historic Capitol's hole-in-the-wall boasts a new attraction: a menu."It's yuppified!" exclaimed Joe Wyatt, 38, a lobbyist for the Association of Maryland Pilots, as he bought a soft drink one recent afternoon.
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