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Capitol Steps

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NEWS
November 2, 2003
Harford Community College will present Capitol Steps, the musical satire company from Washington, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Amoss Center, 200 Thomas Run Road, Bel Air. The former congressional staffers in the show focus on topical humor, comic one-liners and witty songs, with an up-to-the-minute take on politics. Tickets range from $12 to $24, and are available at the HCC Ticket Office in the Chesapeake Center. For more information or to order tickets by credit card, call the HCC Ticket Office at 410-836-4211 or 410-879-8920, Ext. 211.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 21, 2007
BILL STRAUSS, 60 Capitol Steps founder Bill Strauss, who founded the political satire group Capitol Steps, died Tuesday at his home in McLean, Va., the musical troupe announced. He had been battling pancreatic cancer since 1999. Mr. Strauss, a Harvard-trained lawyer and Senate subcommittee staff member, got the idea of forming Capitol Steps in 1981 after hosting a party that ended with a jam session around the piano in which partygoers did parodies of Reagan-era newsmakers. Months later, the group made its debut at the office Christmas party of Mr. Strauss' employer, Sen. Charles H. Percy, an Illinois Republican.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
As co-founder of The Capitol Steps, a troupe of Washington-based satirists who have been lampooning Washington politics since the early 1980s, Bill Strauss doesn't worry about his satire being trumped by reality.He's far more of-the-moment, taking political shenanigans as they happen and skewering them so quickly that further events barely have time to unfold.Here's his take on what happened yesterday, a song tentatively scheduled to open the troupe's New York performance tonight. Sung to the tune of "That's Entertainment," it's "That's an Impeachment":A funk we are inThis whole week has beenA real slow news weekWhen a guyIn a Monica tieTells a lieWith a weak alibiWhat's he tryWhen the lie doesn't fly?
NEWS
October 23, 2005
Students to present play about Holocaust Winters Mill High School drama students will present I Never Saw Another Butterfly at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday in the school auditorium, 560 Gorsuch Road, Westminster. The story is based on people who endured the horrors of living in the Terezin ghetto in Czechoslovakia, which became known as a holding area for those who would be sent to Auschwitz during the Holocaust. Of the 15,000 children who lived in Terezin, 100 survived. The children were given hope and strength by a teacher, Irena Synkova, who helped them express their feelings through art, song and poetry.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
This year's Celebration of the Arts in Howard County is a real hometown affair. Now in its fourth year, the event serves as a major fund-raiser for the Howard County Arts Council, which uses the money for grants and outreach. So it seems fitting that this year's gala will feature a performance by the Capitol Steps musical comedy troupe, which has some members who got their start in Columbia. "The people in Columbia are very arts-oriented," said troupe member Michael Tilford, " a former member of Young Columbians Community Theater.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
Election years are not the only times the League of Women Voters exists. That is part of the message the Howard County chapter would like to spread. From community information sessions to candidate forums, the league has worked to provide nonpartisan information to residents. "Most people envision all of these little old ladies sitting around and preparing for elections," said Carole M. Conors, president of the League of Women Voters of Howard County. "But the league does a lot both for and in the community."
FEATURES
By SARAH PEKKANEN and SARAH PEKKANEN,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1999
Inside a small, elegant office a short drive south from Capitol Hill the employees are working overtime. They monitor CNN, C-SPAN and NPR. They tap into the Internet, tracing each twist and turn of the White House scandal. They pore over newspapers and Newsweek.In other words, these 30-and-40-year-olds spend their days much like the Hill staffers whose jobs it is to frantically follow the impeachment trial.Their nights, however, are another story.Then, they don costumes -- a black beret, say, or a Paula Jones-style plastic nose (before the surgery)
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
In the age of Clinton and Buchanan, Gingrich and Forbes, political satirists might consider this advice: take a few months off. Joke for joke, irony for irony, the news is tough to beat.Lord knows, the Capitol Steps musical satire group is trying valiantly, but audiences may wonder: With Pat Buchanan mugging for cameras at Mount Rushmore, who needs satire?This recent delicious campaign moment doesn't get into the Capitol Steps latest show. Instead a troupe member portrays Mr. Buchanan in a sort of Tommy Hilfiger Stars-and-Stripes shirt and American flags sticking out of his head.
NEWS
December 21, 2007
BILL STRAUSS, 60 Capitol Steps founder Bill Strauss, who founded the political satire group Capitol Steps, died Tuesday at his home in McLean, Va., the musical troupe announced. He had been battling pancreatic cancer since 1999. Mr. Strauss, a Harvard-trained lawyer and Senate subcommittee staff member, got the idea of forming Capitol Steps in 1981 after hosting a party that ended with a jam session around the piano in which partygoers did parodies of Reagan-era newsmakers. Months later, the group made its debut at the office Christmas party of Mr. Strauss' employer, Sen. Charles H. Percy, an Illinois Republican.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | May 24, 1993
Singing for their supper is nothing new to the Capitol Steps, troupe of ex-congressional staffers who have learned that satirizing politics is a jollier way to make a living than working for politicians.But now the hit musical and theatrical group is singing to a different audience: the U.S. Supreme Court.Probably for the first time, a singing brief has been filed in the somber edifice where black-robed justices study Latin-laced tomes.The brief -- actually, an "exhibit" submitted in support of a brief -- lampoons President Clinton with "Pander Bear," a takeoff on the Elvis Presley hit "Teddy Bear."
NEWS
November 2, 2003
Harford Community College will present Capitol Steps, the musical satire company from Washington, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Amoss Center, 200 Thomas Run Road, Bel Air. The former congressional staffers in the show focus on topical humor, comic one-liners and witty songs, with an up-to-the-minute take on politics. Tickets range from $12 to $24, and are available at the HCC Ticket Office in the Chesapeake Center. For more information or to order tickets by credit card, call the HCC Ticket Office at 410-836-4211 or 410-879-8920, Ext. 211.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
This year's Celebration of the Arts in Howard County is a real hometown affair. Now in its fourth year, the event serves as a major fund-raiser for the Howard County Arts Council, which uses the money for grants and outreach. So it seems fitting that this year's gala will feature a performance by the Capitol Steps musical comedy troupe, which has some members who got their start in Columbia. "The people in Columbia are very arts-oriented," said troupe member Michael Tilford, " a former member of Young Columbians Community Theater.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 27, 2000
In Baltimore County Missing police dog recovered 10 miles from owner's home RANDALLSTOWN - A Baltimore City police dog that ran away from its owner's Owings Mills home on Wednesday was found early yesterday - on a front porch of a home 10 miles away. Augie, a 6-year-old German shepherd, apparently saw a deer and took off through a cornfield near Officer Wali Salaam's home in the 4200 block of Winfield Ave. in Baltimore County. Several officers and a police helicopter searched for Augie, who eventually showed up at house near Liberty and Offutt roads.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
Election years are not the only times the League of Women Voters exists. That is part of the message the Howard County chapter would like to spread. From community information sessions to candidate forums, the league has worked to provide nonpartisan information to residents. "Most people envision all of these little old ladies sitting around and preparing for elections," said Carole M. Conors, president of the League of Women Voters of Howard County. "But the league does a lot both for and in the community."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 11, 1999
The political potshots came fast and furious -- courtesy of the comedy troupe Capitol Steps -- in an evening of musical political satire at the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. After the show, 500 ticket holders were invited to a reception to meet cast members, and to congratulate U.S. Rep. Ben Cardin and his wife, Myrna, and Constance and Ramon Getzov, recipients of the congregation's Tzedek and Keter Shem Tov awards. The Cardins were honored for their efforts in social justice and service to the community; the Getzovs for their participation in and generosity to the congregation.
FEATURES
By SARAH PEKKANEN and SARAH PEKKANEN,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1999
Inside a small, elegant office a short drive south from Capitol Hill the employees are working overtime. They monitor CNN, C-SPAN and NPR. They tap into the Internet, tracing each twist and turn of the White House scandal. They pore over newspapers and Newsweek.In other words, these 30-and-40-year-olds spend their days much like the Hill staffers whose jobs it is to frantically follow the impeachment trial.Their nights, however, are another story.Then, they don costumes -- a black beret, say, or a Paula Jones-style plastic nose (before the surgery)
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
Who is that woman in the Tina Turner wig, firing a musical salvo at former Washington Mayor Marion Barry?Why, it's Ann Schmitt of Annapolis, now a member of the nationally known, musical satire troupe Capitol Steps. It's the same Ann Schmitt who said she moved to the Washington area six years ago to find a "real job," away from the instability, the craziness of the New York theater world.Right. Now she works on Capitol Hill, where political reality is what you make it, where in the worst of times -- especially in the worst of times -- one thing is abundant: Fodder for satire.
NEWS
October 23, 2005
Students to present play about Holocaust Winters Mill High School drama students will present I Never Saw Another Butterfly at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday in the school auditorium, 560 Gorsuch Road, Westminster. The story is based on people who endured the horrors of living in the Terezin ghetto in Czechoslovakia, which became known as a holding area for those who would be sent to Auschwitz during the Holocaust. Of the 15,000 children who lived in Terezin, 100 survived. The children were given hope and strength by a teacher, Irena Synkova, who helped them express their feelings through art, song and poetry.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Regardless of their political persuasion, what part of the country they hail from, or what their interest was in seeing a snippet of the Senate impeachment trial live, some of the Americans who lined up outside the Capitol yesterday had something in common: They seemed to forget that President Clinton has already been impeached."
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