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NEWS
October 17, 1997
Charles T. Knabusch,57, chairman, chief executive officer and president of La-Z-Boy Inc., died Tuesday in Monroe, Mich., of a heart attack.Brown Meggs,66, an author and the former chief executive officer of Capitol Records who signed the Beatles, died Oct. 8 in San Francisco of a brain hemorrhage.Pub Date: 10/17/97
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
In the early 1990s, a teenage punk fan named Damian Kulash wanted to release a compilation CD of songs from his favorite Washington bands. But Kulash, a Washington native and disciple of the city's DIY movement, needed cash to fund the project. He went to Dischord Records founder Ian MacKaye, the figurehead of the Washington punk scene, and asked for a loan. MacKaye agreed to give Kulash $2,000 — but not before laying a guilt trip on the kid. "He said, 'If you don't pay back this money, I won't have it to lend to somebody else, and you will singlehandedly be the person who shut down the D.C. scene.
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NEWS
March 13, 1991
Lloyd W. Dunn, 84, founder of the Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, which issues the Grammy awards, died Friday of cancer in Encino, Calif. Mr. Dunn worked for McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. in New York before coming to California in the late 1940s to open an advertising agency. In 1950, he became vice president of merchandising and sales for Capitol Records and then was vice president of artists and repertoire and president of the former Capitol Records International Corp. He and four other record executives founded the music academy in 1957.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - "Awards shows have to be of the moment now," says Dick Clark, a shoo-in for a lifetime achievement award if they ever had an awards show for awards shows. Clark's 32nd annual American Music Awards air at 8 tonight on ABC. The early years of the show may have been like yearbooks reflecting on the previous year's hits, but this new edition is very much November 2004 in its staging, with Gwen Stefani making her national TV solo debut, and cast members of Desperate Housewives and Lost among the presenters.
NEWS
January 18, 1996
Morty Corb, 78, who played bass for Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Pearl Bailey and Nat King Cole, died Saturday of a brain aneurysm in Los Angeles. He began performing professionally at 17 with a San Antonio dance band. After a stint with an Army Air Force band, he moved to Los Angeles in 1946 and soon joined Armstrong's "All Stars" band. He also performed and recorded with Peggy Lee, Pete Fountain, Al Hirt and Jimmy Durante.Margaret Jenkins, 92, who competed in two Olympics, died Jan. 8 in Jackson, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - "Awards shows have to be of the moment now," says Dick Clark, a shoo-in for a lifetime achievement award if they ever had an awards show for awards shows. Clark's 32nd annual American Music Awards air at 8 tonight on ABC. The early years of the show may have been like yearbooks reflecting on the previous year's hits, but this new edition is very much November 2004 in its staging, with Gwen Stefani making her national TV solo debut, and cast members of Desperate Housewives and Lost among the presenters.
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2003
What are the odds that the debut single by the daughter of the king of rock 'n' roll would be anything more than a fleeting novelty? Fifty to one? Fifty thousand to one? Take that bet. Lisa Marie Presley's first single, "Lights Out," is a powerful, hauntingly personal work. Capitol Records released "Lights Out" to radio stations a week ago, and many of the nation's most powerful pop outlets have added it to their playlists. Presley's gutsy, blues-edged voice has a distinctive flair, and her lyrics on the song feature a memorable image about going through life under the weight of the Elvis Presley legacy: Someone turned the lights out there in Memphis That's where my family's buried and gone Last time I was there I noticed a space left Next to them in Memphis in the damn back lawn.
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 2002
Brainwashed, the album George Harrison was working on when he died of cancer last year, is out today, a last will and musical testament from the former Beatles guitarist. "Sometimes I feel like I'm on the wrong planet," Harrison says in an accompanying video distributed to the media by his record company, Capitol Records. Brainwashed is Harrison's final attempt to make sense of that planet. By album's end, he sounds relieved to be departing it. What he leaves behind are 12 songs that don't sound quite like he had hoped.
FEATURES
By Phil Sweetland and Phil Sweetland,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 2004
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Some unlikely celebrities are performing country songs these days. Talk-show host Jerry Springer has been singing a new patriotic tune called "In America" to packed houses at casinos in Mississippi recently and at Democratic Party fund-raisers throughout Ohio. He also recorded a country music album, which has yet to be released. Al Franken, the liberal comedian and author of the best-selling Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them, visited Nashville in the fall to record an offbeat country duet with Claudia Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
In the early 1990s, a teenage punk fan named Damian Kulash wanted to release a compilation CD of songs from his favorite Washington bands. But Kulash, a Washington native and disciple of the city's DIY movement, needed cash to fund the project. He went to Dischord Records founder Ian MacKaye, the figurehead of the Washington punk scene, and asked for a loan. MacKaye agreed to give Kulash $2,000 — but not before laying a guilt trip on the kid. "He said, 'If you don't pay back this money, I won't have it to lend to somebody else, and you will singlehandedly be the person who shut down the D.C. scene.
FEATURES
By Phil Sweetland and Phil Sweetland,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 2004
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Some unlikely celebrities are performing country songs these days. Talk-show host Jerry Springer has been singing a new patriotic tune called "In America" to packed houses at casinos in Mississippi recently and at Democratic Party fund-raisers throughout Ohio. He also recorded a country music album, which has yet to be released. Al Franken, the liberal comedian and author of the best-selling Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them, visited Nashville in the fall to record an offbeat country duet with Claudia Church.
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2003
What are the odds that the debut single by the daughter of the king of rock 'n' roll would be anything more than a fleeting novelty? Fifty to one? Fifty thousand to one? Take that bet. Lisa Marie Presley's first single, "Lights Out," is a powerful, hauntingly personal work. Capitol Records released "Lights Out" to radio stations a week ago, and many of the nation's most powerful pop outlets have added it to their playlists. Presley's gutsy, blues-edged voice has a distinctive flair, and her lyrics on the song feature a memorable image about going through life under the weight of the Elvis Presley legacy: Someone turned the lights out there in Memphis That's where my family's buried and gone Last time I was there I noticed a space left Next to them in Memphis in the damn back lawn.
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 2002
Brainwashed, the album George Harrison was working on when he died of cancer last year, is out today, a last will and musical testament from the former Beatles guitarist. "Sometimes I feel like I'm on the wrong planet," Harrison says in an accompanying video distributed to the media by his record company, Capitol Records. Brainwashed is Harrison's final attempt to make sense of that planet. By album's end, he sounds relieved to be departing it. What he leaves behind are 12 songs that don't sound quite like he had hoped.
NEWS
October 17, 1997
Charles T. Knabusch,57, chairman, chief executive officer and president of La-Z-Boy Inc., died Tuesday in Monroe, Mich., of a heart attack.Brown Meggs,66, an author and the former chief executive officer of Capitol Records who signed the Beatles, died Oct. 8 in San Francisco of a brain hemorrhage.Pub Date: 10/17/97
NEWS
January 18, 1996
Morty Corb, 78, who played bass for Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Pearl Bailey and Nat King Cole, died Saturday of a brain aneurysm in Los Angeles. He began performing professionally at 17 with a San Antonio dance band. After a stint with an Army Air Force band, he moved to Los Angeles in 1946 and soon joined Armstrong's "All Stars" band. He also performed and recorded with Peggy Lee, Pete Fountain, Al Hirt and Jimmy Durante.Margaret Jenkins, 92, who competed in two Olympics, died Jan. 8 in Jackson, Calif.
NEWS
March 13, 1991
Lloyd W. Dunn, 84, founder of the Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, which issues the Grammy awards, died Friday of cancer in Encino, Calif. Mr. Dunn worked for McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. in New York before coming to California in the late 1940s to open an advertising agency. In 1950, he became vice president of merchandising and sales for Capitol Records and then was vice president of artists and repertoire and president of the former Capitol Records International Corp. He and four other record executives founded the music academy in 1957.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services Inc | August 21, 1992
In 1966, the Beatles upset sensibilities with their "Yesterday -- and Today" album cover picturing the Fab Four in butcher smocks amid chunks of meat and chopped-up parts of toy dolls.Public indignation led to a quick recall of the offending covers, most of which were destroyed by Capitol Records. The record was reissued in more ho-hum wrappings. More than a few shrewd folks surmised there might one day be some value to the banned covers.They were right. A stereo version of the original album in sealed, mint condition recently sold for $15,000.
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