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By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - There are fewer fully trained police officers posted at the U.S. Capitol complex now than there were on Sept. 11. That day, as officers evacuated the Capitol and surrounding office buildings amid rumors of another airplane-turned-bomb headed for the dome, 1,209 officers were on the force. Yesterday, U.S. Capitol Police spokesman Dan Nichols said there were 1,228 "on staff," but 48 of those are recruits training in Glynco, Ga., to join the department at the end of the month.
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NEWS
April 15, 2014
I found your recent story about the fight between an aide to Del. Mary-Dulany James and his brother both alarming and painful ( "After claiming he was assaulted by 'a black man,' aide to Harford legislator James, brother charged in Annapolis fight," April 10). According to the Capitol Police report, Luke Horah stated that a large African-American male assaulted him and fled the scene. Here you have a sibling altercation that resulted in injury, but rather than tell the truth about his brother, Mr. Horah decided to implicate a fictitious "black man. " What if the truth hadn't been discovered so quickly?
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NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - Choking back tears, Republican Rep. Bill Thomas of California, one of Congress' most powerful and quick-tempered members, told a hushed House chamber yesterday that he exhibited "poor judgment" in calling the police last week on Democrats. "You deserve better judgment from me, and you'll get it," the usually acerbic chairman of the Ways and Means Committee told his colleagues. "Because of my poor judgment, those outside the House who want to trivialize, marginalize and debase this institution were given an opportunity to do so."
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Oscar-nominated director Josh Fox was arrested on Wednesday at a public hearing chaired by Maryland Rep. Andy Harris, a Capitol Police spokeswoman confirmed. Fox, whose 2010 documentary “Gasland” raised environmental concerns about the natural gas mining process known as fracking, was attempting to film a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Energy and Environment that was focused on the issue. The hearing, titled “fractured science,” was intended to question the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's finding that the fracking process has likely been responsible for groundwater contamination.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - An obscure but powerful arm of Congress is trying to take custody of all government records related to the anthrax attack on Capitol Hill, a move that could make it more difficult to get a public accounting of the cost of cleaning up the Hart Senate Office Building. But officials of the Environmental Protection Agency, which helped direct the cleanup effort, balked this week at surrendering their files. If strictly followed, an order issued by the U.S. Capitol Police Board would require federal agencies such as the EPA to destroy all copies of documents relating to the anthrax incident at the Capitol complex.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Capitol Police Officer John Novak gazes past the cars and tourists and legislative aides on Independence Avenue and rests his eyes on the Capitol."
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Oscar-nominated director Josh Fox was arrested on Wednesday at a public hearing chaired by Maryland Rep. Andy Harris, a Capitol Police spokeswoman confirmed. Fox, whose 2010 documentary “Gasland” raised environmental concerns about the natural gas mining process known as fracking, was attempting to film a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Energy and Environment that was focused on the issue. The hearing, titled “fractured science,” was intended to question the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's finding that the fracking process has likely been responsible for groundwater contamination.
NEWS
By JOHANNA NEUMAN AND NICK TIMIRAOS and JOHANNA NEUMAN AND NICK TIMIRAOS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It started with a misunderstanding last week at a security checkpoint in the Longworth House Office Building, where guards regularly examine the identification and belongings of those entering. But by yesterday, the encounter between U.S. Rep. Cynthia A. McKinney, a Georgia Democrat, and a Capitol Police officer - in which he touched her on the shoulder and she jabbed him with her cell phone - had begun to mushroom into a furor, replete with accusations of racial profiling and threats of criminal charges.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - Outfitted with combat boots, Army fatigues and 9 mm pistols, a new cadre of Capitol Hill inhabitants cut a startling silhouette yesterday against the marble landscape of Congress. National Guard military police, with black-and-white "MP" bands on their left arms, had arrived to protect the House and Senate. The last time the Guard carried out a similar assignment was during the riots in Washington that broke out after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHNEIDER | February 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- At least eight U.S. senators were among 200 people evacuated last night from the Russell Senate Office Building after sensors in the building signaled the possible presence of a nerve agent, according to U.S. Capitol Police. An alarm in the building attic signaled the presence of a dangerous substance at 6:30 p.m., prompting the evacuation. A subsequent test was negative, but those evacuated were held in an adjacent garage for three hours, until additional testing confirmed that the scare was a false alarm.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS AND RICHARD B. SCHMITT and MAURA REYNOLDS AND RICHARD B. SCHMITT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush intervened yesterday to defuse an increasingly contentious dispute between congressional leaders and the Justice Department, ordering that documents seized in an unprecedented raid on a congressman's office be sealed for 45 days. Congressional leaders, displaying rare bipartisan unity, had angrily accused the Justice Department of overstepping its authority and demanded the return of the material confiscated in a weekend search of the Capitol Hill office of Rep. William J. Jefferson, a Louisiana Democrat, who is under investigation for bribery.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY M. PHELPS AND TOM BRUNE and TIMOTHY M. PHELPS AND TOM BRUNE,NEWSDAY | May 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In the latest incident involving the sometimes troubled Kennedy clan, Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy headed yesterday to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota for treatment for addiction after a minor late-night accident that he acknowledged he did not remember. Kennedy, a Rhode Island Democrat, did not explicitly say in a statement yesterday what addiction treatment he was seeking, but he announced for the first time that he had also checked himself into the Mayo Clinic over Christmas for addiction to prescription pain medication.
NEWS
By JOSEPH FARRELL | May 2, 2006
Subpoenas are being issued in the infamous transgression between Rep. Cynthia A. McKinney, Democrat of Georgia, and Capitol Police Officer Paul McKenna in which the officer tried to stop the congresswoman from going through a House office building metal detector because she wasn't wearing her identification pin. He allegedly grabbed her by the arm, and Ms. McKinney allegedly then struck Officer McKenna with her cell phone. The point of all of this is that the Capitol Police are not in place to recognize members of Congress but to recognize trouble and act on it for the purpose of maintaining security.
NEWS
By JOHANNA NEUMAN AND NICK TIMIRAOS and JOHANNA NEUMAN AND NICK TIMIRAOS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It started with a misunderstanding last week at a security checkpoint in the Longworth House Office Building, where guards regularly examine the identification and belongings of those entering. But by yesterday, the encounter between U.S. Rep. Cynthia A. McKinney, a Georgia Democrat, and a Capitol Police officer - in which he touched her on the shoulder and she jabbed him with her cell phone - had begun to mushroom into a furor, replete with accusations of racial profiling and threats of criminal charges.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHNEIDER | February 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- At least eight U.S. senators were among 200 people evacuated last night from the Russell Senate Office Building after sensors in the building signaled the possible presence of a nerve agent, according to U.S. Capitol Police. An alarm in the building attic signaled the presence of a dangerous substance at 6:30 p.m., prompting the evacuation. A subsequent test was negative, but those evacuated were held in an adjacent garage for three hours, until additional testing confirmed that the scare was a false alarm.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | February 2, 2006
Cindy Sheehan and Beverly Young, ejected from the State of the Union address Tuesday night for wearing slogan-bearing T-shirts, are off the hook with Capitol police - but not with the manners police. Capitol police dropped charges of unlawful conduct against antiwar activist Sheehan, and apologized to her and Young, the wife of Rep. C.W. Bill Young of Florida, saying "wearing a T-shirt is not enough reason to be asked to leave the gallery, or be removed from the gallery, or be arrested," according to the Associated Press.
NEWS
By Geoffrey C. Upton and Geoffrey C. Upton,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Officer Jacob J. Chestnut, an 18-year veteran of the Capitol Police, was buried yesterday afternoon at Arlington National Cemetery, one week after he and another officer were slain at the Capitol.Chestnut, who served in Vietnam during a 20-year Air Force career, was given full military honors as he was laid to rest under a cherry tree, with his family and hundreds of police officers from around the nation looking on. For the second straight day, thousands of mourners took to the streets and highways in and around the District of Columbia to pay their respects to a slain Capitol police officer.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY M. PHELPS AND TOM BRUNE and TIMOTHY M. PHELPS AND TOM BRUNE,NEWSDAY | May 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In the latest incident involving the sometimes troubled Kennedy clan, Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy headed yesterday to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota for treatment for addiction after a minor late-night accident that he acknowledged he did not remember. Kennedy, a Rhode Island Democrat, did not explicitly say in a statement yesterday what addiction treatment he was seeking, but he announced for the first time that he had also checked himself into the Mayo Clinic over Christmas for addiction to prescription pain medication.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 3, 2005
Law enforcement agencies planning for this month's inauguration ceremonies in Washington are putting the final stitches into what is considered the largest and most comprehensive security net ever attempted in the nation's capital, including an unprecedented plan to search virtually anyone within sight of the president. The country's first inauguration since the 2001 terrorist attacks, and its first wartime swearing-in ceremony since Richard M. Nixon's second term, will also feature extensive use of electronic sensors to detect chemical and biological agents on the city's streets.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Laura Sullivan and Mark Matthews and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush gave a spirited defense of this week's terror alerts in New York, New Jersey and Washington yesterday, as more details emerged of FBI warnings to Congress of a potential al-Qaida attack on U.S. lawmakers. "When we find out intelligence that is real, that threatens people, I believe we have an obligation, as government, to share that with people," Bush said at a convention of minority journalists. "Imagine what would happen if we didn't share that information with the people in those buildings and something were to happen, then what would you write?"
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