Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCapital Spending
IN THE NEWS

Capital Spending

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2001
After looking at the scorched earth that's currently the U.S. telecommunications-equipment business, it would be understandable if Tim Cahall was fearful for Maryland - which boasts that this capital-spending sector is an emerging economic strength. But just the opposite is true of Cahall, chief executive officer of Columbia-based Trellis Photonics Ltd., which makes optical-networking gear. He believes Maryland will enjoy a long-term benefit from the bursting of the capital-spending bubble.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley signaled Monday that he might support an increase in Maryland's gasoline tax as part of a broader effort to create jobs through a massive construction program focused on transportation and schools. In response to questions at a State House news conference, O'Malley said flatly that he favors raising more revenue — but didn't specify how. He would not rule out backing a blue-ribbon commission's recommendation that the state raise its 23.5-cents-per-gallon gas tax by 15 cents.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | February 8, 1991
As the county begins its annual peek-a-boo budget game, spending on costly building projects shows few signs of slowing.The budget plans of County Executive Robert R. Neall's administration remain shrouded in secrecy. But requests for capital spending next year will rival the $116 million authorized for 1991, Planning Advisory Board vice chairman Robert D. Voegtlin said yesterday.Despite expectations for a no-growth operating budget next year, it seems unlikely the county would not use up the roughly $55 millionit can borrow under charter limitations.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
The House of Delegates voted Tuesday to approve $925 million in new borrowing as part of a $3 billion capital budget. The plan, which would fund major investments, now awaits the blessing of the Senate, which has until the end of the session Monday to act. Democratic leaders praised the capital budget as responsible; Republicans warned that the borrowing could damage the state's credit rating or prompt an increase in real estate taxes to service the...
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1995
The Howard County Council began work on the fiscal 1996 budget yesterday by tentatively approving all of the noneducation projects included in County Executive Charles I. Ecker's $93 million capital budget proposal.The $49.5 million in projects approved by straw votes of the council yesterday range from $1.8 million for the repair of the road over Brighton Dam Bridge to $4.9 million for the design and construction of a Marriottsville facility to temporarily hold trash that the county intends to ship elsewhere.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1990
If Baltimore County voters approve all $200 million for capital spending on the Nov. 6 ballot, and also vote for the 2 percent property-tax cap, the county won't be able to spend $28 million of the money, the county budget office says.In addition, $13.5 million in operating budget money used for capital projects will have to be cut over the next two years, said budget director Fred Homan.The $28 million, Homan said, would be cut because of the lessened borrowing power the county would have due to lower income from the cap. The other $13.5 million reduction would come from cash the county had planned to spend on capital projects, but that would have dried up with the cap, he said.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 31, 1991
Despite a $517 million fourth quarter loss, Bethlehem Steel will increase its capital spending to about $500 million during this year.The estimate for 1991 capital spending was part of the company's earnings report that was released yesterday. The company has been spending increasing amounts for new facilities and equipment, going from $304 million in 1988 to $421 million in 1989 and then to $488 million last year.The increased spending does not reflect any new initiatives, but rather projects already started, according to Bethlehem spokesman Henry Von Spreckelsen.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 23, 2007
The Carroll County commissioners adopted yesterday a $328.4 million operating budget for fiscal year 2008 and a $187.1 million capital spending plan that represents a nearly 70 percent increase over this year's capital budget. The six-year capital plan includes a new $79 million northeast high school that Hampstead and Manchester parents pushed for after county management and budget director Ted Zaleski cut it from his initial proposal. Funds for the public schools - $149.2 million - plus another $10.7 million for debt service on school construction projects consume nearly 50 percent of the operating budget for fiscal year 2008, which begins July 1. Also included is $13.7 million for other educational expenses, including Carroll Community College.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
Companies hunkered down after the corporate scandals, terrorist attacks and Internet bubble pop at the turn of the century and decided to focus on old-fashioned profitability. The strategy worked, and they amassed hundreds of billions of dollars of free cash, a record amount on corporate balance sheets. They could have used it for a mega-spending spree on new plant equipment, computers, office furniture, even real estate, but what did they buy instead? Their own stock. So-called "buybacks" skyrocketed in historical terms to $334 billion at Standard & Poor's 500 companies last year, pulling almost even with $342 billion that companies put to capital expenditures.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF Sun staff members Greg Tasker, Eric Siegel, Larry Carson and Tanya Jones contributed to this article | March 25, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening continued to spread the wealth from Maryland's overflowing coffers yesterday as he asked the General Assembly to spend an additional $57.3 million on a grab bag of politically appealing projects.Baltimore and Baltimore County would be among the biggest beneficiaries of the governor's supplemental capital budget, which the House Appropriations Committee approved last night after trimming $1.6 million from the request.The spending proposal still must be reviewed by the Senate.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Thursday afternoon that his school construction requests for the fiscal year starting this summer recognize the need for spending restraint in difficult times, but he said the same economic challenges "make the education of our future work force and leaders more important than ever," according to his prepared remarks. The executive's annual message to the 15-member planning board on capital spending for 2012 offered highlights of a $670 million spending plan.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | April 2, 2010
A Baltimore city councilman is calling for greater accountability in the Recreation and Parks Department amid complaints about the agency's use of capital funds. Councilman Carl Stokes plans a news conference at the Ambrose Kennedy playground in his East Baltimore district this morning to call for an audit of the department's spending. "We don't know what the [department's] economic situation is," Stokes said. "We don't know if there is a budget crisis or not." A 150-member volunteer transition team appointed by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake reported a lack of transparency in the department's spending.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Amid a constant drumbeat of news about struggling big-name companies, it's easy to forget that small businesses are suffering, too. The most recent Small Business Optimism Index, released monthly by trade association The National Federation of Independent Business, shows the second-lowest reading in the 35-year history of the survey. The December index fell 2.6 points to 85.2, which also was the lowest reading since the second quarter of 1980, according to the group. "It's pretty deep," NFIB chief economist William Dunkelberg says of the recession.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 23, 2007
The Carroll County commissioners adopted yesterday a $328.4 million operating budget for fiscal year 2008 and a $187.1 million capital spending plan that represents a nearly 70 percent increase over this year's capital budget. The six-year capital plan includes a new $79 million northeast high school that Hampstead and Manchester parents pushed for after county management and budget director Ted Zaleski cut it from his initial proposal. Funds for the public schools - $149.2 million - plus another $10.7 million for debt service on school construction projects consume nearly 50 percent of the operating budget for fiscal year 2008, which begins July 1. Also included is $13.7 million for other educational expenses, including Carroll Community College.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | April 27, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- Comcast Corp. reported yesterday an 80 percent increase in first-quarter profit thanks to high demand for packages of television, telephone and Internet services. Net income increased to $837 million, or 26 cents a share, from $466 million, or 22 cents, for the first quarter last year, the largest U.S. cable-television provider said. Revenue rose 32 percent to $7.39 billion. Customers signed up for high-speed Internet at a record rate and phone and digital-TV subscribers rose more than analysts predicted.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,[Sun reporter] | April 1, 2007
County Executive David R. Craig's philosophy toward addressing Harford's infrastructure needs could be: "If we build it, the funding will come." Yet Craig's proposed $370 million capital spending plan has many county elected leaders feeling uneasy. The unprecedented amount nearly doubles last year's record high and marks a 360 percent increase since 2003. The priorities include school construction, library expansion, a new detention center, an expanded water treatment plant and a new government administration building.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
A proposed $70 million capital budget for fiscal 2002 and six-year building plan unveiled yesterday by county schools Superintendent Carol S. Parham shift the focus from repairing older schools to modernization and construction. The move toward construction includes the superintendent's recommendation to spend $50,000 for planning of a 13th high school that would serve the growing West County area. Proposed for fiscal year 2003, the allocation is a fraction of the school's estimated $63 million cost, but significant to advocates who have watched the school inch its way up the building priority list for years.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
Now that it has better control over its debt, Black & Decker Corp. plans to beef up its capital spending and marketing in the coming year, Nolan D. Archibald, chairman and chief executive officer of the Towson-based company, told shareholders yesterday."
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | October 6, 2006
Although the Howard County school board has given preliminary approval to a $99.6 million capital budget for the next school year, the final budget will be set by a still-to-be-determined group of decision-makers: the winners in next month's countywide elections. Depending on the results of the November election, the school board that approves a capital spending plan in the spring could look completely different from the panel that unanimously set the process in motion Tuesday night. Board member Courtney Watson said Tuesday's vote was a formality to get the budget submitted to the state.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
It may have taken months of hearings and discussions to get there, but when the Howard County school board approved this year's operating and capital budgets in less than 20 minutes, the unanimous vote reflected one of the smoothest budget cycles in years. "It certainly is one we went through with the least angst and contention," board member Patricia Gordon, who has sat through six budget processes, said of Thursday's vote on the budget covering the coming school year. The board formally adopted both budgets after action by the County Council.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.