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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - The governors of Maryland and Virginia and the mayor of the District of Columbia signed a first-ever regional homeland security pact yesterday, a document that federal authorities say could become a model for other major metropolitan areas seeking to tighten their emergency response strategies. The signing of the "Commitments to Action" was the culmination of the National Capital Region Summit on Homeland Security, convened by federal Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge for local officials at Washington's Fort McNair.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Thursday put his support behind efforts to bring the 2024 Olympics to the greater Washington-D.C. area. The term-limited governor added his voice to that of Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe and D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray in backing the endeavor, which could cost billions if approved. Washington is competing with Boston, New York and San Francisco to convince officials with U.S. Olympic Committee that the city is the country's best shot at winning the games on an international stage.
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BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Across the Atlantic the foreign travelers come by the tens of millions each year, to see the must-sees, do the must-dos.They ferry across New York Harbor to behold the world's most famous symbol of liberty. They do Disney World and sunbathe on beaches by turquoise waters in Florida.They marvel at the Grand Canyon and head for Hollywood to see life imitating art imitating life.But most foreign visitors never stray far enough from the perennial draws to take in Baltimore's waterfront, Annapolis' Georgian gems, Richmond, Va.'s Southern gentility, the Shenandoah Valley's autumn glory.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
When the Washington-area snipers launched their shooting rampage a decade ago, Prince George's County restaurateur Paul LaRuffa suffered the same effects as everyone else: anxiety about leaving the house, fear of pumping gas, worry for loved ones - all adding up to a general jumpiness about when, where and whom the gunmen would strike next. But in LaRuffa's case - though he didn't know it at the time - there was a difference. He had been the snipers' first victim. A month before the shootings that terrorized the region, LaRuffa, then 55, had closed his restaurant in Clinton for the night, walked out with a couple of friends and got into his car. He was about to pull out when 17-year-old Lee Boyd Malvo approached, raised a Bushmaster XM-15 E2S rifle and fired five .223-caliber rounds through the driver's side window.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | June 16, 1997
WBFF (Channel 45) was the most honored of Baltimore's five network television stations at the 39th annual Capital Region Emmy Awards dinner in Washington Saturday. The Fox affiliate won eight regional Emmys, with chief photographer Scott Livingston sharing in six of them.Overall honors among area broadcasters, however, go to Maryland Public Television, which ended the evening with 11 Emmys.Once again, the Fox affiliate dominated in the cinematography/videography category. In addition to Livingston, Steve Weinstein and Scott Hedeen were also honored for composites of their spot news photography.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
The leaders of Maryland, Virginia and Washington pledged yesterday to continue reducing pollution from sewage treatment plants, but did not offer support for a leading environmental group's attempt to require strict limits on nutrients released into the Chesapeake Bay. In their second capital region summit, Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., Virginia Gov. Mark R. Warner and Washington Mayor Anthony A. Williams touched on a variety of issues during a...
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | June 13, 1994
Albany, New York. -- Across America, regionalism is being reinvented. The goal isn't, though, to merge center cities and suburbs into a single government -- the formula pushed in the '60s.This time, the goal is to figure out which is the best level to deliver varying services economically and efficiently. Pressures of strained government budgets and tax revolts are driving the ++ debate.And so is regional competitiveness, as leaders from Charlotte to Memphis, Miami to Seattle, worry whether fragmented government services are any way for their ''citistate'' regions to cope with challenges of foreign trade, clean air, solid waste, work-force preparedness and keeping infrastructure up to date.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Thursday put his support behind efforts to bring the 2024 Olympics to the greater Washington-D.C. area. The term-limited governor added his voice to that of Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe and D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray in backing the endeavor, which could cost billions if approved. Washington is competing with Boston, New York and San Francisco to convince officials with U.S. Olympic Committee that the city is the country's best shot at winning the games on an international stage.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
Top business leaders from Maryland, Washington and Virginia formally committed yesterday to joining forces in making a bid to bring the 2012 Summer Olympic Games to this region.Senior executives who control some of the biggest corporate budgets in this area, so often polarized by urban rivalries of long standing, agreed at the Loew's Annapolis Hotel to spend between $6 million and $12 million in private-sector money over the next two years on getting the bid.The lower figure already has been committed, although no one would say after the closed-door meeting who put up how much.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
When the Washington-area snipers launched their shooting rampage a decade ago, Prince George's County restaurateur Paul LaRuffa suffered the same effects as everyone else: anxiety about leaving the house, fear of pumping gas, worry for loved ones - all adding up to a general jumpiness about when, where and whom the gunmen would strike next. But in LaRuffa's case - though he didn't know it at the time - there was a difference. He had been the snipers' first victim. A month before the shootings that terrorized the region, LaRuffa, then 55, had closed his restaurant in Clinton for the night, walked out with a couple of friends and got into his car. He was about to pull out when 17-year-old Lee Boyd Malvo approached, raised a Bushmaster XM-15 E2S rifle and fired five .223-caliber rounds through the driver's side window.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2006
After a lively Democratic primary race for Montgomery County executive, contenders Isiah Leggett and Steven Silverman could only watch last night as returns trickled in - a process complicated by problems that caused polling locations in some precincts to open much later than scheduled. Leggett, a former County Council member and former chairman of the state Democratic Party seeking to become Montgomery's first black county executive, appeared to have a significant lead over Silverman, president of the County Council, with less than half of the precincts tallied at the county Board of Elections.
NEWS
September 30, 2005
FBI asked to probe vandalism at mosque BETHESDA - The Council on American-Islamic Relations has asked the FBI to investigate vandalism last week at a mosque in Silver Spring. The council's Maryland and Virginia office said the incident Sept. 22 at the Muslim Community Center on New Hampshire Avenue should be investigated as a possible hate crime. Someone sprayed paint on the word Muslim and drew a Star of David on the mosque's outdoor sign. Montgomery County police are investigating the incident.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
Howard and Anne Arundel counties could be incorporated into a disaster plan for the Washington region under a bill pending in Congress. A homeland security bill that recently cleared the House would require the Department of Homeland Security to study whether the National Capital Region should be expanded to include the two Maryland counties. "Howard and Anne Arundel counties are where many commuters live, and it's important that these counties be part of any coordinated safety plan if a terrorist attack should occur," said Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Maryland Democrat who inserted into the homeland security bill the provision calling for the change.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
The leaders of Maryland, Virginia and Washington pledged yesterday to continue reducing pollution from sewage treatment plants, but did not offer support for a leading environmental group's attempt to require strict limits on nutrients released into the Chesapeake Bay. In their second capital region summit, Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., Virginia Gov. Mark R. Warner and Washington Mayor Anthony A. Williams touched on a variety of issues during a...
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - The governors of Maryland and Virginia and the mayor of the District of Columbia signed a first-ever regional homeland security pact yesterday, a document that federal authorities say could become a model for other major metropolitan areas seeking to tighten their emergency response strategies. The signing of the "Commitments to Action" was the culmination of the National Capital Region Summit on Homeland Security, convened by federal Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge for local officials at Washington's Fort McNair.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
Top business leaders from Maryland, Washington and Virginia formally committed yesterday to joining forces in making a bid to bring the 2012 Summer Olympic Games to this region.Senior executives who control some of the biggest corporate budgets in this area, so often polarized by urban rivalries of long standing, agreed at the Loew's Annapolis Hotel to spend between $6 million and $12 million in private-sector money over the next two years on getting the bid.The lower figure already has been committed, although no one would say after the closed-door meeting who put up how much.
NEWS
September 30, 2005
FBI asked to probe vandalism at mosque BETHESDA - The Council on American-Islamic Relations has asked the FBI to investigate vandalism last week at a mosque in Silver Spring. The council's Maryland and Virginia office said the incident Sept. 22 at the Muslim Community Center on New Hampshire Avenue should be investigated as a possible hate crime. Someone sprayed paint on the word Muslim and drew a Star of David on the mosque's outdoor sign. Montgomery County police are investigating the incident.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2006
After a lively Democratic primary race for Montgomery County executive, contenders Isiah Leggett and Steven Silverman could only watch last night as returns trickled in - a process complicated by problems that caused polling locations in some precincts to open much later than scheduled. Leggett, a former County Council member and former chairman of the state Democratic Party seeking to become Montgomery's first black county executive, appeared to have a significant lead over Silverman, president of the County Council, with less than half of the precincts tallied at the county Board of Elections.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Across the Atlantic the foreign travelers come by the tens of millions each year, to see the must-sees, do the must-dos.They ferry across New York Harbor to behold the world's most famous symbol of liberty. They do Disney World and sunbathe on beaches by turquoise waters in Florida.They marvel at the Grand Canyon and head for Hollywood to see life imitating art imitating life.But most foreign visitors never stray far enough from the perennial draws to take in Baltimore's waterfront, Annapolis' Georgian gems, Richmond, Va.'s Southern gentility, the Shenandoah Valley's autumn glory.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | June 16, 1997
WBFF (Channel 45) was the most honored of Baltimore's five network television stations at the 39th annual Capital Region Emmy Awards dinner in Washington Saturday. The Fox affiliate won eight regional Emmys, with chief photographer Scott Livingston sharing in six of them.Overall honors among area broadcasters, however, go to Maryland Public Television, which ended the evening with 11 Emmys.Once again, the Fox affiliate dominated in the cinematography/videography category. In addition to Livingston, Steve Weinstein and Scott Hedeen were also honored for composites of their spot news photography.
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