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Capital Punishment

NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
AMONTGOMERY County lawmaker plans to introduce legislation in next year's General Assembly that would abolish the death penalty in Maryland, revisiting an issue lawmakers have sidestepped since the 1980s. Del. Dana Lee Dembrow said he already has had a bill drafted to end capital punishment in Maryland. The Democratic legislator said he is seeking co-sponsors and will file the bill before the session begins Jan. 10. Maryland lawmakers considered and rejected a bill this year that would have imposed a moratorium on executions, but Dembrow's planned legislation would be the first attempt to abolish capital punishment entirely since then-Del.
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NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
As lawyers begin this week to argue a rare Baltimore death penalty case, legislators in Annapolis are weighing a handful of bills that would broaden the scope of the state's harshest penalty. One bill, introduced on behalf of the governor, would call for capital punishment for those who intimidate potential witnesses or try to stop someone from testifying. Another, inspired by the Washington-area sniper killings in 2002, would allow capital punishment when a defendant is convicted of committing more than one killing within a certain time frame, as in cases of spree or serial killings.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Sarah Koenig and Ivan Penn and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2002
On a visit to a death row inmate in Baltimore's Supermax prison in 1997, Del. Salima S. Marriott received a charge from the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson that would catapult her into the forefront of the debate on capital punishment in Maryland. Although Marriott had long opposed the death penalty, Jackson wanted her to take a bolder step and resoundingly voice her position on state executions, which she believed unfairly targeted African-Americans. She became the face and voice of the campaign against the death penalty in Annapolis, hoping to win at least a temporary halt to executions in Maryland.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | December 6, 2005
Maryland has been engaged in capital punishment for more than 200 years - first by hanging, then a gas chamber and finally by lethal injection. The earliest recorded execution in the state took place Oct. 22, 1773, when four "convict servants" were hanged for slitting the throat of their master, Archibald Hoffman, according to a Maryland Penitentiary historian who wrote an overview on capital punishment for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and...
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 23, 1998
HUNTSVILLE, Texas -- Like everything else in this state, Christmas decorations are big. Just down the highway in Houston, a 64-display, drive-through light show is said to be the world's largest. Even in a small town like Lufkin to the northeast, an entire city block explodes in megawatt, wall-to-wall white lights.Here, the modest downtown gets into the spirit as well. A group of men spent a recent morning climbing up and down ladders to decorate the city's most distinctive building with gaily painted signs wishing all the happiest of holidays.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
Maryland's attorney general and Baltimore County's top prosecutor, both death penalty supporters, want the General Assembly to abandon what they are calling haphazard and arbitrary restrictions on capital punishment cases approved by the Senate this month. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in an interview that the Senate proposal is "ill-prepared, ill-thought-out, awkward and clumsy." Under that plan, capital punishment would be limited to murder cases where there is biological or DNA evidence, a videotaped confession, or a video recording of the crime.
NEWS
May 15, 2000
GOV. Parris N. Glendening was wrong when he approved the execution of murderer Flint Gregory Hunt. The governor was wrong when he approved the execution of murderer Tyrone X. Gilliam. And the governor would be wrong to approve the execution next month of murderer Eugene Colvin-el. Since 1976, states have executed some 630 people, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. In each case, it was wrong. The state must punish wrongdoers, but state-sanctioned killing is immoral -- period.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Sensing a real chance to abolish the death penalty in Maryland after years of trying, opponents of capital punishment brought a parade of religious, political and civil rights leaders to Annapolis Thursday to urge lawmakers to do away with the ultimate sanction. Roman Catholic Archbishop William E. Lori, testifying before a legislative committee for the first time since taking the helm of the Archdiocese of Baltimore last year, said he had come to Annapolis to throw the church's support behind the repeal effort.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Andrew A. Green and Jennifer McMenamin and Andrew A. Green,sun reporters | December 19, 2006
Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley said yesterday that he will wait for guidance from the state's highest court before deciding whether Maryland should continue its practice of carrying out capital punishment by lethal injection. "We are waiting for our Court of Appeals to make its decision and then when that happens, you'll see the legislature and executive act according to its guidance," said O'Malley, who personally opposes capital punishment but has said he will enforce the state's death penalty statute.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
Having won approval in both chambers of Maryland's General Assembly, a landmark bill to abolish the state's death penalty awaits only Gov. Martin O'Malley's signature before becoming law. It is a tremendous political and moral victory for Mr. O'Malley, a long-time opponent of capital punishment who campaigned for a repeal during his first term only to come up short. That leaves only one major item of unfinished business on his agenda regarding the issue: Commuting the sentences of the five men currently on Maryland's death row to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.
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