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Capital Projects

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Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
The Capital Debt Affordability Committee, dominated by appointees of Gov. Martin O'Malley, raised the state's debt limit by $150 million Monday over the dissent of Comptroller Peter Franchot. The move increases the state's capacity to borrow money for such projects as roads and school construction from $925 million to $1.075 billion. The committee's action in effect borrows lending capacity from the future, saying the extra spending during the coming budget year should be repaid in 2017.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A University System of Maryland Board of Regents committee approved issuing more than $117 million in bonds Thursday for capital projects in the coming fiscal year that include 700 beds of student housing at Towson University. About $42 million of the $117 million will be for late phases of Towson University's West Village housing project. The fiscal year 2015 bond issuance also includes $20 million for the expansion of Burdick Hall at Towson University and $13.3 million for residence hall renovations at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A University System of Maryland Board of Regents committee approved issuing more than $117 million in bonds Thursday for capital projects in the coming fiscal year that include 700 beds of student housing at Towson University. About $42 million of the $117 million will be for late phases of Towson University's West Village housing project. The fiscal year 2015 bond issuance also includes $20 million for the expansion of Burdick Hall at Towson University and $13.3 million for residence hall renovations at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | February 28, 2014
The Columbia Association Board of Directors approved the capital and operating budgets for fiscal years 2015 and 2016 Thursday evening. The board was unanimous in its approval of the FY15 and FY16 capital budgets, which total $12.81 million and $9.66 million. The FY15 and FY16 operating budgets, which total $63,014,000 and $65,226,000, were approved by a 6-3 vote, with board members Alex Hekimian, Gregg Schwind and Russ Swatek voting against. Board member Tom O'Connor, of Dorsey's Search, was absent.  Notable allocations for capital projects in the FY15 budget include $4 million for construction of Haven on the Lake, CA's downtown wellness retreat in the Rouse Company building, $400,000 for improvements to the Dorsey Hall bathhouse, $350,000 for architecture and engineering for an indoor tennis facility at the SportsPark and $200,000 to build a park with bocce ball courts near the Hickory Ridge Village Center.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1991
The Hayden administration has temporarily frozen spending for any new capital projects as part of Baltimore County's effort to save money and get through the recession.County Administrative Officer Merreen E. Kelley issued the order on Oct. 30, but County Executive Roger B. Hayden today said he will review all pending capital projects by Nov. 30 and will approve funding for any that have a large impact.Budget Director Fred Homan said the move came after he determined that county departments are already under contract to spend $46 million to $48 million on capital projects.
NEWS
By Carol Bowers and Carol Bowers,Staff writer | November 24, 1991
Harford County ventured into the bond market Tuesday for the first time in eight years to raise money for capital projects.The countyborrowed a total of $22 million: $13.1 million for eight capital projects, including two new public schools, and $8.9 million to pay for water and sewer system improvements.For eight years, the county used available cash to pay for capital projects, such as schools or building renovations, instead of borrowing money for those projects.The county did borrow money during those eight years for water and sewer projects, but those bonds did not increase the county's long-term debt because they are being paid off with user fees.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | January 20, 1991
The county executive has proposed killing five capital building or improvement projects to save more than $720,000.The largest project County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann has proposed cutting is a new animal shelter for the county Humane Society -- one of the last capital building projects approved by the former council.If the County Council approves killing that project it would savean estimated $500,000.The savings are needed because the county must end the fiscal year, June 30, with a minimum of $4.5 million in its coffers to protect the coveted AA bond rating awarded the county by Moody's and Standard & Poor's, two bond rating houses.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
Carroll commissioners may have to consider raising the piggyback tax to pay for essential capital projects such as roads and schools, Planning Commission members said yesterday.The budget has been cut to the "bare bones," member Dennis P. Bowman said."We even took the marrow from the bones," member Louis J. Pecoraro added.The Planning Commission recommended yesterday that the county spend $11 million in local money on capital projects in fiscal 1994 -- $2.5 more than is available.In addition to the county money, the budget includes $15.6 million in state, federal and other revenue -- from such things as impact fees -- for capital projects.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | January 4, 1994
The Carroll County government will have to unload its obligations supporting enterprise fund debts to clear the way for bond sales to build roads, bridges and schools, the county finance director advised the commissioners yesterday."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | August 12, 1994
The Columbia Council agreed last night to spend up to $25,000 to hire a consultant to evaluate the Columbia Association's procedures in awarding contracts for capital projects.The nonprofit association is not subject to competitive bidding laws that apply to government but has its own internal policies for soliciting bids and hiring contractors for construction projects.Councilwoman Norma Rose, who made the proposal last night, said in an interview Wednesday that it's "not all that clear" how contracts for design or construction work are awarded and that "there is a sense that procedures need revision."
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | November 12, 2013
Last week, the Maryland Public Service Commission held a series of public hearings, including one in Ellicott City, for consumers to testify on a proposed set of rate increases that the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. says it needs to maintain quality service. In a County Council meeting Nov. 12, two BGE representatives elaborated on the projects they have planned or are working on in Howard County specifically. BGE wants to raise their typical customer's monthly electric bill by $3.90 and a typical gas bill by $1.97 a month.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
Howard County last week hosted the first of three workshops designed to gather public input into capital projects and improvements for downtown Ellicott City, and another is set for next week. The first workshop was held Sept. 12 at St. Paul's Church. Additional sessions will be Sept. 26 and Oct. 10 at the Roger Carter Community Center, 3000 Milltowne Drive in Ellicott City; both will begin at 7 p.m. This year, the county included $3 million in the county's capital budget for sidewalks, curbs and other projects to beautify and improve the Tiber River basin and its amenities.  A portion of the money is also planned for water quality and drainage projects.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
The Anne Arundel County Council vote this week to trim $5 million from the school's capital budget has led school officials to allege that the cut was retaliation for a squabble last year. On Wednesday, after the school board reviewed more than three dozen projects in jeopardy because of the cuts, Superintendent Kevin Maxwell said the board now has "the most contentious relationship we've had with the council. " "How we're going to work together going forward is as much a question as where we are now," Maxwell said.
NEWS
By Dutch Ruppersberger | April 15, 2013
Local government is truly where the rubber meets the road. As Baltimore County executive, I proudly oversaw capital projects ranging from the restoration of the Randallstown Library after a fire to the expansion of Cromwell Valley Park. We rebuilt Essex Elementary School and constructed a new interchange at I-795 and Dolfield Road in Owings Mills. We were able to pay for these and dozens of other projects - which improved the everyday lives of thousands of people - with the help of tax-exempt municipal bonds.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
The state has a long list of public-works projects but little money. The private sector is willing to invest but has been starved for work. From that simple equation comes a business model called public-private partnerships — or P3s — that Maryland hopes will help alleviate its backlog of transportation and other infrastructure needs. The O'Malley administration is expected to unveil legislation this week that would offer a channel for tapping into a reservoir of corporate money and expertise.
NEWS
By Jason Botel & Mitchell Whiteman | November 26, 2012
When Marylanders cast their ballots on Election Day, they said "yes, you can" to same-sex couples who want to get married, to young people whose families immigrated here illegally and who hope to receive in-state tuition, and to casino operators who want to expand their operations here. Now, as we move forward from this election, it's time to say "yes, you can" to another group of Marylanders who are no less deserving of affirmation: public school students from underserved communities.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
Department heads have told Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker they want $108 million in capital projects -- $14 million more than they asked for last year and $34.7 million more than what they were actually granted.Their requests for fiscal 1994 were forwarded to the Planning Board on Monday for its perusal. The board will conduct a public hearing on the requests Feb. 18.A majority of projects, $67 million worth, would be financed through the sale of general obligation bonds.The county's bond affordability committee, which recommends ceilings on bond sales, has yet to issue a report for the coming fiscal year.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | December 9, 1992
Carroll's Planning Commission will recommend next week that the county spend about $11 million on capital projects in the next fiscal year -- about $2.5 million more than is available.The panel will also recommend to the county commissioners on Tuesday that the county pay for 29 projects totaling $6.5 million if other money becomes available."You're basically fighting to keep your head above water at this point," commission chairwoman Barbara Jean Dixon said.At a work session yesterday, Planning Director Edmund R. Cueman suggested the county sell more general obligation bonds to increase the amount of money available for capital projects.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
Baltimore County is bracing for another tough budget year, delaying new construction and improvements to infrastructure while looking for other ways to save. But County Council members and County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's administration say they don't plan to raise taxes to bring in more revenue. The county has not raised property taxes for 23 years, said Kamenetz's chief of staff, Don Mohler. Its income taxes haven't risen for 19. Kamenetz hopes to continue that run, Mohler said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley wants to spend nearly $23 million to improve Maryland's often-maligned state parks, proposing widespread renovations for a system that critics say has been deteriorating for more than a decade. The money would go toward highly visible projects at some of the state's most visited public spaces. Among other improvements, it would renovate shabby bathhouses at Assateague State Park near Ocean City , repair the lighthouse complex and parking lots at Point Lookout in Southern Maryland, and replace a fishing pier at North Point State Park that was severely damaged by Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003.
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