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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
Magna Entertainment Corp.'s offer of $68 million to buy Rosecroft Raceway includes $12 million for the track itself plus capital improvements, backstretch upgrades and guaranteed purses for 10 years, according to Tom Winebrener, president of the board of directors of the Cloverleaf Standardbred Owners Association. Representing the CSOA, which owns the Prince George's County harness track, the board voted Wednesday to sell Rosecroft but to wait until Oct. 17 to decide whom to sell to. Magna and two other companies made presentations to the CSOA membership - trainers, breeders and horse owners - and submitted letters of intent for purchasing the track.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Heavy Seas Alehouse is opening a second location in Rosslyn, Va. The new Heavy Seas will occupy nearly 6,000 square feet at the base of an office tower at 1501 Wilson Boulevard in Rosslyn, two doors down from Roti Mediterranean Grill. The restaurant is scheduled to open later this year. Heavy Seas Alehouse is part of $2.5 million in capital improvements planned to renovate the lobbies and retail spaces at 1501 and 1515 Wilson Boulevard, according to a statement released by Monday Properties, the Arlington, Virginia-based real estate investment firm that manages the properties.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1996
An increase in revenue from county and state sources and from town impact fees has generated a budget surplus of nearly $300,000 for the town of Sykesville.An independent audit of town finances identified the surplus, which is about 25 percent of the town's $1.2 million budget and comes in the same year that Sykesville has reduced its property tax rate by 4 cents per $100 of assessed value.The surplus could mean another tax reduction next year."I know there will be a lot of sentiment to lower taxes again, but we have to see about putting this money to the best possible use," Mayor Jonathan S. Herman said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
An education advocate and a longtime state lawmaker say they are eyeing Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff's seat. Democrat Laurie Taylor-Mitchell, an art historian and local education advocate, said she has decided to run for the four-year term in 2014, and Republican Del. Wade Kach said he's "seriously considering it. " Huff, a Lutherville Republican, was elected in 2010 for the district that covers the northern part of the county....
NEWS
May 24, 2002
A lawsuit that could affect how Carroll County finances a $16 million water treatment plant on Piney Run Lake in Sykesville will be heard in Carroll County Circuit Court at 1:30 p.m. today. Several South Carroll residents, who oppose the project, filed the suit. They contend that the county cannot use water maintenance fees, paid by those using the public water system, to fund capital improvements such as the plant. "The basis of the suit is that this type funding violates the state constitution," said Gerald J. Ryan, a Westminster businessman who is paying residents' legal fees.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Although Amtrak is getting closer to self-sufficiency in its operating budget, the government-owned railroad needs a huge infusion of federal money to replace dilapidated equipment and property, federal and Amtrak officials say.Amtrak passengers paid 80 percent of the railroad's operating costs in 1993, continuing a steady increase from the 48 percent they contributed in 1981. The officials say the railroad could operate self-sufficiently in the next decade.But they also say the railroad needs nearly $4 billion in federal money to repair and replace its aging trains, dilapidated stations and inadequate maintenance yards.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1996
A boost in its credit rating will allow Mercy Medical Center to sell $30 million in bonds to finance capital improvements and other initiatives, the hospital said yesterday.Both Moody's Investors Service and Standard & Poor's Corp. gave Mercy an "A" rating, citing the hospital's ability to increase market share, recruit top surgeons and align with 70 doctors in Maryland Personal Physicians Inc., a group of Central Maryland primary care providers.The "A" ratings come after four years of cutting costs and repositioning the hospital as a top provider of women's health services, said Thomas Mullen, Mercy's chief financial officer.
NEWS
December 2, 1994
The Carroll County Planning Commission is facing the same unpleasant task it faces every year: choosing which capital improvements to include in the next year's budget.As long as Carroll County continues to follow the self-imposed austerity program that limits money available for construction of public infrastructure, the planning commission will be forced to just say "no" to deserving public construction projects.Carroll is no longer a rural county with a static population. The populace is growing at a steady rate, creating a need for more schools, libraries, senior centers and recreation centers.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
I don't understand why utilities are asking for or would be granted the right to charge ratepayers to fund capital improvements like replacing aging infrastructure ("Utility surcharge bill advances in Senate," Feb. 6). Haven't we ratepayers been paying for these depreciating assets all along over their lifetimes? Isn't it the responsibility of the owners (stockholders, etc.) to provide capital? Why should ratepayers be "taxed" to cover costs that are rightly the responsibility of owners?
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and David Folkenflik and Carl M. Cannon and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- White House officials sought yesterday to quash speculation that the administration's next budget will end operating subsidies for Amtrak, insisting that six senators who have protested the presumed cuts had been misinformed."
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Fitch Ratings said Tuesday it has issued a AA- rating on two series of bonds worth $299 million to be issued to The Johns Hopkins Health System for refinancing and capital improvements. One series of revenue bonds from the Maryland Health & Higher Educational Facilities Authority valued at $152 million will be used to refinance four series of outstanding bonds. Another series of taxable bonds will fund the implementation of new clinical systems and other capital projects. Both series are expected to sell in early May. Fitch also affirmed its AA- rating on Hopkins outstanding debt.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
I don't understand why utilities are asking for or would be granted the right to charge ratepayers to fund capital improvements like replacing aging infrastructure ("Utility surcharge bill advances in Senate," Feb. 6). Haven't we ratepayers been paying for these depreciating assets all along over their lifetimes? Isn't it the responsibility of the owners (stockholders, etc.) to provide capital? Why should ratepayers be "taxed" to cover costs that are rightly the responsibility of owners?
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
Some state lawmakers questioned Tuesday why slot machine revenue allocated for racetrack improvements should be diverted to help fund the day-to-day operations of the Maryland Jockey Club, which reported losing millions at Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course in recent years. Referring to the Jockey Club's recent filing of unaudited financial statements for 2008 and 2009, Del. Frank S. Turner, a Howard County Democrat, said at a House committee hearing that he was "disturbed" that lawmakers did not have enough information about the tracks' operations.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
Baltimore County is working on a long-term lease agreement for city-owned Robert E. Lee Park that would accelerate the pace of necessary repairs if state funding is approved. The footbridge that serves as the most popular entrance to the park, just north of the county line, has been closed since the summer after Baltimore County inspectors declared the bridge unsafe. County Executive James T. Smith Jr. said Monday that the county is seeking $3 million in state money - its only bond bill request - to repair the bridge and address environmental concerns.
NEWS
December 13, 2005
What a difference a surplus makes. Baltimore's rosier financial picture allowed Mayor Martin O'Malley to announce last week a $75 million plan to help build and renovate city schools, which average nearly 50 years in age. His initiative is meant to fit in with an ongoing school downsizing and restructuring plan. While City Hall and North Avenue have often been at odds over rebuilding schools, these efforts are a sound investment in the city's future. But many Baltimore schools are so dilapidated that the new city money is merely a drop in the bucket.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2004
The Columbia Association is poised to spend an additional $1.5 million in renovations to the Supreme Sports Club after already dedicating more than $820,000 in upgrades to its fitness facilities while facing the threat of a mega-sports gym competitor. If the association does not respond to the proposed Life Time Fitness in Columbia's Gateway Commerce Center, it stands to lose between $4 million and $5 million annually, said Rob Goldman, the association's vice president for sport and fitness.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | April 2, 1991
Despite financial hard times, the Howard County executive proposed yesterday spending a record $1.1 billion over the next six years on new capital improvements.Among the proposals are a $5.4 million yard-waste composting facility and spending $11.7 million to advance construction on highway projects in the upcoming fiscal year."Many of the projects are financed by bonds over 20 years, and it is not something we have to pay off today," said Raymond S. Wacks, the county budget officer, in explaining the billion-dollar capital program at a time when County Executive Charles I. Ecker is proposing cuts in the operating budget and layoffs.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Amtrak is expected to receive $555 million for the next fiscal year under a Senate compromise reached yesterday within a larger bill that would set the amount of money that can be spent on transportation projects.Despite his outspoken opposition to subsidies for Amtrak, Sen. Richard C. Shelby, an Alabama Republican who leads a subcommittee that allocates money for transportation, approved the figure.The money represents an 11 percent cut from the $621 million proposed by President Clinton early this year for the national passenger rail system.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
Facing the threat of a mega sports facility opening in Columbia's Gateway Commerce Center, the Columbia Association will expand the Supreme Sports Club's operating hours and make more than $220,000 in capital improvements. The Supreme Sports Club is scheduled to begin operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week on Sept. 7, Howard County's first gym to be open at all hours, said Rob Goldman, the association's vice president for sport and fitness. In customer surveys since 1985, Goldman said 10 percent to 12 percent of users have indicated that they are not satisfied with the club's hours -- 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 5:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays; and 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2003
The Baltimore County school system will receive an extra $3.7 million from the state next fiscal year to pay for renovations and other capital projects, said Matthew Joseph, the county's education liaison. The state Board of Public Works awarded the funding Wednesday, after County Executive James T. Smith Jr., Superintendent Joe A. Hairston, other county officials and parents lobbied in Annapolis. The school system is slated to receive a total of $6.7 million in state funding for its capital needs in 2003-2004.
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