Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCapital Centre
IN THE NEWS

Capital Centre

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 23, 1992
Garth Brooks is not the likeliest-looking pop idol.At a time when most male country stars are lean, tan and hunky, Brooks is pale, round-faced and pudgy, looking more like the Pillsbury Doughboy than a cowboy pin-up.But you wouldn't know it by the way his audience reacts.Last night at the Capital Centre, Brooks was on the receiving end of audience adulation all night.It wasn't just the usual screams and cheers, either; he spent as much time shaking hands, accepting presents and returning waves as he did singing and playing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2004
For more than a decade, Baltimore-area hockey fans have watched for free as the Washington Capitals practiced at the Piney Orchard Ice Arena in Odenton. But that opportunity will soon be gone. In May 2006, the Capitals plan to move to a newer, larger facility to be built atop the Ballston Common Mall parking garage in Arlington, Va. The local county board there approved money for the $42.8 million project last week. The Capitals had openly contemplated the move for years, with team officials saying they wanted to be closer to their fans and to practice in a state-of-the-art complex.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | May 26, 1992
Largo -- According to the conventional wisdom, the Cure is an ingeniously gloomy outfit, capable of conveying the dizzying vortex of adolescent depression better than any band in rock. And though the group has had its moments of pop accessibility, they're seen as happy accidents, tuneful anomalies within a generally downbeat catalog.But as the Cure made clear at the Capital Centre last night, the conventional wisdom is crap. Sure, this quintet has its moments of darkness and despair, but that's just one of the moods in its musical repertoire.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Once, the Washington Wizards had Michael Jordan wearing their uniform, and that was a marketer's dream. When the team landed Jordan as a player in 2001, it was like adding Babe Ruth to the Yankees' lineup, or signing the Beatles to play Shea Stadium. But after two years of sellout crowds and nationally televised games (but middling won-lost records) MJ drove away from MCI Center for the last time in a gleaming convertible. Attendance, which had averaged 20,424 in the two Jordan years, slipped 23 percent last season to a more Wizards-like 15,740.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 28, 1991
Largo -- Anyone who remembers Spinal Tap guitarist Nigel Tufnel and his amplifiers that went up to 11 ("It's One Louder Than Ten" he'd explain) would have appreciated the look and sound of Neil Young's show at the Capital Centre last night. It wasn't just that Young had decked the stage with towering amps, including a pair of Fender Bassman cabinets 12 feet high; he also made sure his massive props were accompanied by an equally outsized sound.From the moment he and his backing band, Crazy Horse, hit the stage, the audience was awash in electric thunder.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | November 13, 1991
The Washington Capitals are off to their best start in franchise history, they have won five of seven games at the Capital Centre and the home attendance reflects this. The Capitals are 535 fans a game above a year ago.The Capitals have averaged 16,642 a game this year, up from 16,107 a year ago and have had one sellout (18,130), last Friday against Detroit."I think our overall excellent play, both at home and on the road, is reflected in our attendance so far," said Lew Strudler, vice president in charge of marketing.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | November 7, 1992
The 1950s and '60s in pro basketball were dominated by two powerful centers -- George Mikan and Wilt Chamberlain, who, by brute force and intimidation, convinced general managers and coaches that the quickest way to a championship was finding a big man in their image.In time, this thinking changed with the arrival of finesse centers such as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton and David Robinson. Then multifaceted players such as Magic Johnson, Larry Bird and Michael Jordan proved a team could win titles without a monster in the middle.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2002
LANDOVER - The Capital Centre was state-of-the-art when it opened almost 30 years ago with skyboxes and a giant screen that showed instant replays. But in later years, the arena where the Washington Bullets won their only National Basketball Association championship was outdated and unwanted by its big-league tenants. The sports and concert venue abutting the Capital Beltway was used in the past year only for indoor men's lacrosse, and yesterday, as the saying from the Bullets championship season went, the fat lady finally sang.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2002
LANDOVER -- With a volley of thunderous explosions, the old Capital Centre outside Washington collapsed in a billowing cloud of dust early yesterday, ending 29 years of sports and entertainment history, and stranding millions of treasured personal moments in memory. The end came at 8:05 a.m., with the sequential detonation of 355 pounds of dynamite pressed into 500 key points of the structure by technicians from Controlled Demolition Inc. of Phoenix in Baltimore County. In seconds, the stairwells toppled, and 7 million pounds of tension -- cranked into the roof's supporting cables in 1972 -- were released.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
Demolition of the Capital Centre in Landover, an unused sports and concert venue built in 1973, will begin by the end of the year to make way for a "main street" of shops and restaurants, the developer said yesterday. A partnership led by the Cordish Co., the Baltimore developer that rebuilt the Inner Harbor's Power Plant into a retail and entertainment complex, has been working on the plans for about two years. The design has changed since the original pitch, partly because a 16-screen movie theater planned by Earvin "Magic" Johnson was scrapped for financial reasons.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2002
LANDOVER -- With a volley of thunderous explosions, the old Capital Centre outside Washington collapsed in a billowing cloud of dust early yesterday, ending 29 years of sports and entertainment history, and stranding millions of treasured personal moments in memory. The end came at 8:05 a.m., with the sequential detonation of 355 pounds of dynamite pressed into 500 key points of the structure by technicians from Controlled Demolition Inc. of Phoenix in Baltimore County. In seconds, the stairwells toppled, and 7 million pounds of tension -- cranked into the roof's supporting cables in 1972 -- were released.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 14, 2002
In Prince George's US Airways Arena to be demolished tomorrow morning LANDOVER - The planned demolition of the US Airways Arena in Landover early tomorrow will briefly close a section of the Capital Beltway, Interstate 495. The arena, previously called the Capital Centre, will be brought down by explosives about 8 a.m. Police will close the beltway at the Route 202 exit southbound, and the Route 214 exit northbound, from about 7:50 a.m. until no...
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2002
LANDOVER - The Capital Centre was state-of-the-art when it opened almost 30 years ago with skyboxes and a giant screen that showed instant replays. But in later years, the arena where the Washington Bullets won their only National Basketball Association championship was outdated and unwanted by its big-league tenants. The sports and concert venue abutting the Capital Beltway was used in the past year only for indoor men's lacrosse, and yesterday, as the saying from the Bullets championship season went, the fat lady finally sang.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2002
Developers have signed leases with the first group of shops for the Boulevard at the Capital Centre, a "main street" style development to take the place of the old sports arena off the Capital Beltway in Landover. The retailers are Linens N' Things, Pier 1 Imports, Lane Bryant, Men's Wearhouse, Yankee Candle Co., Children's Place, Shoe Dept., Chuck E. Cheese, Oxford Street and Lucaya. The shops announced this week account for about 80,000 square feet of the 400,000 square feet slated for shops and restaurants.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
Demolition of the Capital Centre in Landover, an unused sports and concert venue built in 1973, will begin by the end of the year to make way for a "main street" of shops and restaurants, the developer said yesterday. A partnership led by the Cordish Co., the Baltimore developer that rebuilt the Inner Harbor's Power Plant into a retail and entertainment complex, has been working on the plans for about two years. The design has changed since the original pitch, partly because a 16-screen movie theater planned by Earvin "Magic" Johnson was scrapped for financial reasons.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
Developers unveiled sketches yesterday of a $150 million, retail and entertainment complex to be located at the site of the former US Airways Arena during the signing of an agreement that allows construction to begin in the fall. The public/private partnership for the Landover project, which will be called the Capital Centre -- the arena's name when it opened in 1973, was formalized in an afternoon event attended by former basketball star Michael Jordan, now a minority owner of the NBA Washington Wizards and NHL Washington Capitals.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
Developers unveiled sketches yesterday of a $150 million, retail and entertainment complex to be located at the site of the former US Airways Arena during the signing of an agreement that allows construction to begin in the fall. The public/private partnership for the Landover project, which will be called the Capital Centre -- the arena's name when it opened in 1973, was formalized in an afternoon event attended by former basketball star Michael Jordan, now a minority owner of the NBA Washington Wizards and NHL Washington Capitals.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1998
US Airways Arena -- best known for pro hockey, hoops and rock concerts -- is being reincarnated as the centerpiece of a $150 million entertainment and retail complex with everything from themed restaurants and upscale shops and megastores to virtual rock climbing and amateur sports.Baltimore-based Cordish Co., developer of the Power Plant entertainment complex at the Inner Harbor, and Abe Pollin, owner of the Landover arena, will announce plans today for the project, to be known by its old name, Capital Centre.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
The Cordish Co. is preparing to demolish the US Airways Arena in Landover to make way for a $150 million retail and entertainment complex, reversing plans that originally called for preserving the 25-year-old building.Cordish and arena owner Abe Pollin made the decision to raze the 19,000-seat venue because design schemes make the existing arena more of an obstacle than an amenity to the new 400,000-square-foot project that they intend to develop.It is expected to cost more than $2 million to demolish the former Capital Centre, which opened in December 1973 as the home of the National Basketball Association's Washington Bullets, although formal estimates to raze the structure have yet to be developed, Cordish officials said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
Magic Johnson Theatres will build a 16-screen, stadium-style movie megaplex as an anchor of the planned Capital Centre entertainment and retail complex on the site of US Airways Arena in Landover, the project's developers plan to announce today.Loews Cineplex Entertainment and Johnson Development Corp. formed the chain three years ago to bring upscale, first-run cinemas to minority neighborhoods in metropolitan areas, said a spokeswoman for Magic Johnson Theatres. The chain runs similar theaters in Los Angeles, Atlanta and Houston and plans to open three more next year in Cleveland, Harlem, N.Y., and Carson, Calif.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.