Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCapital Appreciation
IN THE NEWS

Capital Appreciation

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1992, Werner Renberg | January 12, 1992
In 1991, when stocks in general had a very good year -- and some even rose by 300 percent -- it was possible to build a diversified equity portfolio that would beat the 30.5 percent total return of the Standard & Poor's 500 Stock Price Index.Possible? Yes.Likely? No. Unless you had the data, analytical skills, willingness to take calculated investment risks, and self-confidence that would have led you to buy the year's winning stocks -- in a gloomy economic environment -- before they took off.For most people, it would have been easier to buy shares in one xTC of the year's leading capital appreciation funds, whose portfolios are run by professional managers to achieve maximum capital appreciation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Baltimore-based investment firm T. Rowe Price closed one of its biggest mutual funds to new investors Monday, saying it is concerned about keeping pace with its rapid rate of growth. The Capital Appreciation Fund, which invests about 60 percent in stocks and the rest in bonds and cash, jumped from $13.6 billion in 2012 to $19.1 billion in 2013, according to the firm's 2013 annual report. The fund, which has posted positive returns in every year but two since its 1986 start, had $20.4 billion in assets at the end of March.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | January 7, 2007
The streak is alive. No, not that streak. Legg Mason's Value Trust, skippered by the erudite Bill Miller, failed to beat the S&P 500 stock index last year for the first time since 1990. This is the other Baltimore mutual fund streak: the one that in several ways is even more impressive and more lucrative for shareholders. The one from what may be the best fund you've never heard of. T. Rowe Price's Capital Appreciation Fund made money for investors for the 16th consecutive year in 2006.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
Marriottsville's Geier Asset Management announced Tuesday the launch of its first mutual fund that focuses on long-term return from income and capital appreciation. The Geier Strategic Total Return Fund, with $27.5 million in assets, will be managed by Thomas M. Geier, vice president and chief operating officer of Geier Asset Management. Geier Asset Management is a division of Geier Financial Group, a financial services firm which handles the personal finances of former Baltimore Oriole Cal Ripken Jr. and other baseball players.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
Marriottsville's Geier Asset Management announced Tuesday the launch of its first mutual fund that focuses on long-term return from income and capital appreciation. The Geier Strategic Total Return Fund, with $27.5 million in assets, will be managed by Thomas M. Geier, vice president and chief operating officer of Geier Asset Management. Geier Asset Management is a division of Geier Financial Group, a financial services firm which handles the personal finances of former Baltimore Oriole Cal Ripken Jr. and other baseball players.
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG | February 7, 1993
With common stocks on a roll for almost all of the last five years, it wasn't unusual for equity fund managers to produce average annual total returns exceeding Standard & Poor's 500 Stock Price Index's 15.9 percent. Three of 10 did just that.But 20 percent? Or even higher returns?Not many funds could beat the popular benchmark of stock market performance by 5 percent or more. Those that did tended to be more aggressive funds, characterized by above-average volatility, such as capital appreciation funds.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 16, 1992
PRINCETON, N.J. -- Municipal bond issuers announced yesterday the early redemption of 7 issues totaling more than $9.684 million.The issues being called are: * Corona, Calif., Redevelopment Agency, Series 1987, Sales and Use Tax Revenue Bonds maturing Nov. 1, 1993, Nov. 1, 1998, and Nov. 1, 2007. All outstanding bonds called at 101 1/2 on Nov. 1, 1992.* Rialto, Calif., Series 1991-A, Unified School District Capital Appreciation Certificates of Participation maturing Sept. 1, 2010, and Sept.
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1993 By Werner Renberg | May 2, 1993
When Peter Lynch talks about selecting stocks for a portfolio and managing the portfolio -- as he did so successfully for the 13 years that he managed Fidelity Magellan Fund until his 1990 retirement -- it's worth listening.The same goes for what he has to say about selecting mutual funds and managing your own fund portfolio, as he does briefly in his latest book, "Beating the Street."Much of the book is devoted to recollections of how he chose stocks as Magellan manager and to other stock-picking matters -- including his familiar advice that investors seek opportunities in companies they know something about or whose products they use.But for those who prefer to invest in mutual funds and let professionals do the stock picking for them, Lynch offers a strategy for selecting funds.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | June 26, 1994
Frenzied competition among mutual fund companies for investors has led to some gimmicky marketing, a trend the Vanguard Group, known for its plain-vanilla approach to investing, has long resisted. But now, it seems, the company is succumbing.Taxes is the latest buzzword among funds, and Vanguard is jumping in with a series of funds in July that are intended to reduce shareholders' taxes while retaining stocks.But while "Vanguard's marketing department will have a field day selling these funds, investors already have better choices available at Vanguard," said Daniel P. Wiener, who edits the Independent Adviser for Vanguard Investors, a newsletter based Boston.
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1991, Werner Renber | December 29, 1991
If you're going to make New Year's resolutions, consider a few that could make mutual fund investing more rewarding, and are easier to keep than promises to go on a diet or clean the garage.1. To treat forecasts of stock and bond prices and interest rates with skepticism and not let them rush you into decisions to buy or sell fund shares. No one can say for sure when the economy will pick up steam or what financial markets will do in 1992 or any year.You know the recession will end sooner or later; recessions always have.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | January 7, 2007
The streak is alive. No, not that streak. Legg Mason's Value Trust, skippered by the erudite Bill Miller, failed to beat the S&P 500 stock index last year for the first time since 1990. This is the other Baltimore mutual fund streak: the one that in several ways is even more impressive and more lucrative for shareholders. The one from what may be the best fund you've never heard of. T. Rowe Price's Capital Appreciation Fund made money for investors for the 16th consecutive year in 2006.
BUSINESS
By Russel Kinnel and Russel Kinnel,MORNINGSTAR.COM | July 20, 2003
The year is half over and we've already got double-digit gains. Taking a look at early candidates for domestic-stock fund manager of the year, I found scores of worthy candidates - unlike in the past couple of years, when only a few funds had decent gains amid the dot-com carnage. I came up with a list of 10 particularly appealing front-runners so far. I'm not actually narrowing the field, but it's interesting to see who's in the lead at the halfway point. When I wrote about front-runners last year all three winners were mentioned, but the previous year I missed one of the three.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | December 29, 2002
INVESTORS have been put through the wringer as the market closes in on a third year of negative returns, making monthly 401(k) and brokerage statements painful events for many. "Beaten up, very insecure, lacking confidence, sort of disgusted with the markets, disgusted with their 401(k)," said David Root Jr., a Pittsburgh financial planner. "What I have been hearing is `I keep putting money in my 401(k), and I keep losing money.'" Still, investors must take an active role in managing their money.
FEATURES
By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creators Syndicate | March 31, 1996
Now that April 15 is almost upon us, here are some deductions often overlooked by taxpayers, according to Triple Check Income Tax Service:1.) Unreimbursed job-related expenses, including business travel, hotels, cabs and business entertainment.2.) Business-related automobile expenses, including mileage at 30 cents a mile (note: for 1996, the business-related mileage allowance will go up to 31 cents a mile), and parking fees and tolls not incurred commuting to and from work.3.) Job-hunting expenses incurred while searching for work in the same industry or business, even if a position was not taken.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | June 26, 1994
Frenzied competition among mutual fund companies for investors has led to some gimmicky marketing, a trend the Vanguard Group, known for its plain-vanilla approach to investing, has long resisted. But now, it seems, the company is succumbing.Taxes is the latest buzzword among funds, and Vanguard is jumping in with a series of funds in July that are intended to reduce shareholders' taxes while retaining stocks.But while "Vanguard's marketing department will have a field day selling these funds, investors already have better choices available at Vanguard," said Daniel P. Wiener, who edits the Independent Adviser for Vanguard Investors, a newsletter based Boston.
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1993 By Werner Renberg | May 2, 1993
When Peter Lynch talks about selecting stocks for a portfolio and managing the portfolio -- as he did so successfully for the 13 years that he managed Fidelity Magellan Fund until his 1990 retirement -- it's worth listening.The same goes for what he has to say about selecting mutual funds and managing your own fund portfolio, as he does briefly in his latest book, "Beating the Street."Much of the book is devoted to recollections of how he chose stocks as Magellan manager and to other stock-picking matters -- including his familiar advice that investors seek opportunities in companies they know something about or whose products they use.But for those who prefer to invest in mutual funds and let professionals do the stock picking for them, Lynch offers a strategy for selecting funds.
BUSINESS
By Russel Kinnel and Russel Kinnel,MORNINGSTAR.COM | July 20, 2003
The year is half over and we've already got double-digit gains. Taking a look at early candidates for domestic-stock fund manager of the year, I found scores of worthy candidates - unlike in the past couple of years, when only a few funds had decent gains amid the dot-com carnage. I came up with a list of 10 particularly appealing front-runners so far. I'm not actually narrowing the field, but it's interesting to see who's in the lead at the halfway point. When I wrote about front-runners last year all three winners were mentioned, but the previous year I missed one of the three.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1991
Lipper Analytical Services Inc., the leading statistical tracker of mutual funds (excluding money market funds), divides the funds into 27 categories and issues quarterly and monthly reports on their performance. Here are the Lipper categories and the broad definitions of how funds in each group invest their holdings, or portfolios, preceded by their abbreviated forms:CA -- Capital appreciation. A fund that aims at maximum capital appreciation, frequently by such means as the aggressive turnover of holdings in the fund's portfolio (100 percent turnover would mean, for example, that assets equal to all the fund's holdings were turned over, or reinvested, in a year's time)
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG | February 14, 1993
When promoting their equity mutual funds, sponsors usually cite the funds' total returns and compare them with those of other funds or of a stock price index. If it's appropriate, they stress the funds' dividend records, too.In a recent mailing piece for the Neuberger & Berman Guardian Fund, Chairman Stanley Egener added an unusual boast to such past performance data: an annual capital gains distribution. "Guardian Fund shareholders," he wrote, "have earned an income dividend every quarter, and a capital gains distribution every year, since 1950 when the Fund was established."
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG | February 7, 1993
With common stocks on a roll for almost all of the last five years, it wasn't unusual for equity fund managers to produce average annual total returns exceeding Standard & Poor's 500 Stock Price Index's 15.9 percent. Three of 10 did just that.But 20 percent? Or even higher returns?Not many funds could beat the popular benchmark of stock market performance by 5 percent or more. Those that did tended to be more aggressive funds, characterized by above-average volatility, such as capital appreciation funds.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.