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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
For the fourth year in a row, Maryland has the second highest number of millionaires per capita, according to a report by the Phoenix Affluent Marketing Service. With Hawaii in the lead, Maryland ranks second with about 6.8 percent, or 144,686 households in the state are millionaires—an increase from last year's 6.3 percent, followed by New Jersey and Connecticut with 6.7 percent of households, report released last month said, noting that the top states tend to be smaller with large concentrations of "highly educated professionals and business owners.
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NEWS
By David Rosen | January 30, 2014
Maryland has the most millionaires per capita (170,000, or 7.7 percent of households), but those families who make their money here don't stay here Although Florida has 31 percent fewer millionaires living in the state (per capita) than Maryland, there are 94 percent more millionaires dying there. Closer to home, Virginia has 13 percent fewer living millionaires than we do, but it has 13 percent more dying millionaires. One reason that might explain the discrepancy: Maryland has the highest estate and inheritance taxes in the country.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 19, 2003
A $6.6 billion combined aid package for Micronesia and the Marshall Islands won't keep pace with inflation during the next 20 years and will ultimately produce a substantial cut in the per capita aid to the two impoverished nations, a U.S. General Acounting Office official testified yesterday. Susan S. Westin, the GAO's managing director of international affairs and trade, told the House subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific that an analysis of the proposed aid packages negotiated with the two countries as part of a revised Compact of Free Association shows that even with the creation of trust funds, the countries will face substantial cuts.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
The Baltimore area had the third-highest income growth among the nation's largest metro areas over the past 25 years, in both the short term and the long term, a study released Wednesday showed. Portfolio.com, a business news website, ranked income growth in 100 U.S. cities using a quarter-century's worth of federal income data. The analysis put El Paso, Texas, in first place and placed Baton Rouge, La., second, followed by Baltimore, the Virginia Beach-Norfolk, Va., area and New Orleans.
NEWS
By David Ashenfelter and David Ashenfelter,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 29, 1991
The nation's capital is also the murder capital of the United States, according to a Detroit Free Press computer analysis of preliminary crime figures released yesterday by the FBI.It was the second consecutive year that Washington, D.C., led the nation's most populous cities in per capita homicides. The study ranked cities over 100,000 population on the basis of per capita offense rates for crime categories monitored by the FBI.Detroit, once scorned as the murder capital of the nation, dropped to fourth place in per capita homicides in 1990 behind Washington, New Orleans and Atlanta.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
Marylanders use less gasoline per capita than people in most other states - 551 gallons. The national average is 586 gallons. Residents of Wyoming use the most gas per capita - 1,244 gallons. Data are from 2000. They include gasohol but exclude "special fuels" such as diesel. ....State.... Lowest gas usage ................per capita, in gallons....Rank New York......349............................1 Hawaii......355................................2 Rhode Island......435..............
NEWS
April 6, 1994
An Associated Press article carried in Monday's editions erroneously reported that the federal government spent an average of $4,599 for every American last year.The figure for fiscal 1993 actually was $4,814 per American. The $4,599 figure was the per capita amount spent in fiscal 1992.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL | December 14, 2006
Some see the sign of the revival of cities in scaffolding outside old buildings, others in the construction of sparkling new residential buildings, still others in the proliferation of Starbucks coffee shops. Urban scholars William H. Lucy and David L. Phillips see the sign in an analysis of census data on income. In a recent paper, the University of Virginia researchers found an uptick in per-capita income of residents of major cities compared with residents of their metro areas between 2000 and 2005.
NEWS
May 2, 1996
Different figures, different methodsI am trying to clarify the Enoch Pratt Free Library's per capita funding which was the subject of John Starr's April 17 column and Chris A. Scitti's April 19 letter to the editor.Mr. Scitti's $29 per capita funding amount was calculated by dividing the library's $2.8 million budget by an estimated population of 700,000.The library's fiscal 1996 budget of $20.8 million includes $12 million in direct city funds, $4.1 million in state per capita funding, $3.5 million from the state to operate the Central Library which functions as the State Library Resource Center, $700,000 from other state, federal and special grants and $500,000 from fines, fees and income off Enoch Pratt's original gift to the city.
NEWS
March 18, 2010
I find it unbelievable that the cost for the 2010 census is estimated at just under $15 billion. A quick calculation shows that the cost translates to almost $50 per U.S. citizen. In this day of number crunching and data mining, this per capita cost seems excessive. I am sure if this process were placed under bid by private contractors, a less costly and more efficient process would ensue. This government endeavor only provides fodder for those who condemn government services. Chris Shane, Towson
BUSINESS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
For the fourth year in a row, Maryland has the second highest number of millionaires per capita, according to a report by the Phoenix Affluent Marketing Service. With Hawaii in the lead, Maryland ranks second with about 6.8 percent, or 144,686 households in the state are millionaires—an increase from last year's 6.3 percent, followed by New Jersey and Connecticut with 6.7 percent of households, report released last month said, noting that the top states tend to be smaller with large concentrations of "highly educated professionals and business owners.
NEWS
March 18, 2010
I find it unbelievable that the cost for the 2010 census is estimated at just under $15 billion. A quick calculation shows that the cost translates to almost $50 per U.S. citizen. In this day of number crunching and data mining, this per capita cost seems excessive. I am sure if this process were placed under bid by private contractors, a less costly and more efficient process would ensue. This government endeavor only provides fodder for those who condemn government services. Chris Shane, Towson
NEWS
By Gregory Clark | August 6, 2007
About 160 million people with incomes a fifth or less than the average U.S. income live less than 1,500 miles from our southern border. Given this huge income gap, more border agents and more miles of fence cannot prevent substantial illegal migration. But such migration is actually the United States' most effective foreign aid program, helping some of the poorest people in the world. Some believe such migration should be tolerated, not fought to the death. A look at history suggests that even as illegal migration ebbs and flows, it will remain a problem for the United States.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL | December 14, 2006
Some see the sign of the revival of cities in scaffolding outside old buildings, others in the construction of sparkling new residential buildings, still others in the proliferation of Starbucks coffee shops. Urban scholars William H. Lucy and David L. Phillips see the sign in an analysis of census data on income. In a recent paper, the University of Virginia researchers found an uptick in per-capita income of residents of major cities compared with residents of their metro areas between 2000 and 2005.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
The United States lags "at least a dozen years" behind other industrialized countries in adopting electronic medical records, according to a study published yesterday in the journal Health Affairs. Gerard F. Anderson, a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Bianca K. Frogner, a graduate student there; Roger A. Johns, a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; and Uwe Reinhardt, a professor of economics at Princeton University, are the authors of the article.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 15, 2006
I need to give out some props to the 25 companies and programs and nearly 100 men and women who have agreed to volunteer their time for tomorrow's job fair at the St. Frances Community Center on East Chase Street. This is the fourth year for this King Day event, which brings together prospective employers and men and women in the hunt for jobs, particularly those who've had a tough time because of their criminal records. Ralph Moore, the chief organizer, says this will be the biggest fair the center has staged.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | December 27, 2005
The secret of success in government contracting, as with real estate, is location, location, location -- now more than ever. Capitalizing on its proximity to the nation's capital, Maryland moved up to No. 2 among all states in per capita federal spending on goods and services between fall 2003 and fall 2004, according to Census Bureau numbers being released today. The U.S. government pumped $20.8 billion in procurement contracts here that fiscal year, a $4.6 billion jump from the year before.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
Burlington, Vt. -- It's 5 o'clock in the evening, and the protesters are here. First two, then four. Eventually eight show up in front of the Unitarian Church on Pearl Street, even with the temperature dipping below freezing. Rush hour traffic, if you can call it that in this city of 39,000, rumbles past. A grandmother in a cherry-red coat clasps in her mittens a dog-eared poster with the word "peace" written in permanent marker. A Quaker couple huddling nearby wield two signs, one urging prayer for war hostages (and their captors)
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