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By Liz Atwood | March 29, 2009
Jazz stars from around the world, including Dianne Reeves and Kyle Eastwood, son of Clint, will gather this week for the 10th annual Cape Town International Jazz Festival. The event, Friday and Saturday, will feature musicians on five stages as well as workshops and classes for budding artists. You can see the list of activities at www.capetownjazzfest.com. Here are five other things to do: 1 Hike Table Mountain : If you're feeling energetic, hike to the top of this plateau that rises 3,566 feet above sea level.
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TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
You might call Tracie Thoms a triple-triple threat: The Baltimore native sings, dances and acts, and her career encompasses film, television and theater. Introduced to acting and television at an early age — her father, Donald Thoms, is a Maryland Public Television host and cable TV executive — she further honed her craft at the Baltimore School for the Arts. Thoms went on earn degrees from Howard University and the Juilliard School in New York City. Since that time, the 37-year-old has become a rising star among a new generation of American actors.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 15, 1991
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- Naz Ebrahim descends the parched slope of Devil's Peak, stepping over weeds in the cracked pavement of her once-beloved Rochester Street. She moves to a desolate plot of land overlooking the docks of Table Bay and stops where her six-bedroom house used to stand."It's very sad for me even now to stand here and to look at the devastation that took place," said Mrs. Ebrahim, who remembers the vibrant, racially mixed neighborhood that once was here on the side of one of Cape Town's spectacular mountains.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Sandeep Rao watched this year's World Cup matches in a raucous stadium in Cape Town, late at night in front of a relative's television set in India and on Sunday on a grassy park at the Inner Harbor. "This is actually what they do in South Africa," said the 32-year-old, gesturing at the families sprawled on blankets and young couples sipping beer in front of an oversized screen. "If you don't have a ticket, you watch it in a place like this. In Cape Town there was a waterfront TV set up just like this."
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
When we arrived in Cape Town, South Africa, the "tablecloth" was in full view.We had left Johannesburg, where the sun was shining and the temperatures were in the 80s. After a two-hour flight, my sister, niece and I arrived to find clouds, rain and gusty winds.It was an unusual Cape Town day for February, which is the summer season in South Africa. "It's not a good day to go to Table Mountain," said my sister, who lives in Johannesburg but visits Cape Town often. "Look at that tablecloth!"
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 29, 1998
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- For two years, the Muslim community here has been shaken by a small violent Islamic faction, which uses the pipe bomb as its weapon of choice in a vigilante crusade against crime and its critics.When a bomb exploded Tuesday at the Planet Hollywood restaurant, the finger of suspicion almost inevitably and immediately pointed to the radicals.Unusually, much of the finger pointing came from the Muslims themselves, although there is no evidence to prove their suspicions.
SPORTS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 21, 1997
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- The Swedish yacht EF Language, skippered by Paul Cayard, was headed for victory in the first leg of the Whitbread Round the World Race early today.With a 165-nautical-mile lead over its nearest rival, Merit Cup, and closing steadily on this historic port at the foot of TableMountain, it was assured of taking the prize for the opening, 7,350-mile stretch of the 31,600-mile circumnavigation.But what Cayard called his "re-entry into the real world" was slowed frustratingly as a calm halved the boat's speed from 13 knots to six knots, delaying the crew's hopes of its first night's sleep in a comfortable bed since the departure Sept.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1998
Cape Town has been retired from racing because of a fractured left front leg suffered in the Preakness, Overbrook Farm announced yesterday.The Florida Derby winner finished ninth in the Preakness after being installed as a solid 5-2 third choice in the betting behind Real Quiet and Victory Gallop.He will stand at stud beginning in February at William T. Young's Overbrook Farm, which bred him.Overbrook Farm manager Jim Cannon said he is convinced Cape Town, fifth in the Kentucky Derby, was injured when he pulled a shoe off at the top of the stretch and began fading from contention to the back of the pack.
SPORTS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 5, 1997
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - When the international crews of the yachts competing in the Whitbread Round the World Race stepped ashore here at the end of Leg 1, they were following in the footsteps of mariners of old.Since its foundation in 1652 as a way station for vessels of the Dutch East India Company, Cape Town has been in the business of welcoming transoceanic sailors seeking rest, refreshment and repair.It has long been known as "The Tavern of the Seas," a reputation enhanced by development of a waterfront complex of hotels, restaurants, bars and shops to rival Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 11, 1997
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- This beautiful port city at the tip of Africa is using all its charms in an ambitious bid to become the first African venue for the Olympic Summer Games in 2004.Snuggled beneath Table Mountain and close to the Cape where the Atlantic becomes the Indian Ocean, Cape Town offers a staggering setting for the world's premier sporting event.The South African bid faces competition from Athens, Stockholm, Buenos Aires and Rome, but Cape Town remains optimistic that its magnificent setting will prove irresistible.
NEWS
By Tribune news services | June 25, 2010
Paraguay couldn't score against New Zealand. Then again, it didn't need to. Despite being held to a 0-0 draw by the All Whites on Thursday in Polokwane, South Africa, Paraguay won its World Cup group and moved into the round of 16. Neither team created much in the way of scoring chances — the Kiwis had zero shots on goal. New Zealand now heads home unbeaten, and winless, after 1-1 draws with Slovakia and Italy. In Group E, Japan advanced to the next round along with the Netherlands.
NEWS
By Tribune news services | June 15, 2010
Defending World Cup champion Italy was far from proving itself as a contender for a second straight title Monday. The Italians, who came into the World Cup in South Africa with an aging squad and questions about whether they could again win consecutive tournaments as they did in 1934 and '38, were held to a 1-1 draw by Paraguay in Group F in Cape Town. Antolin Alcaraz gave Paraguay the lead with a header in the 39th minute and Daniele De Rossi equalized for Italy from close range in the 63rd.
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | March 29, 2009
Jazz stars from around the world, including Dianne Reeves and Kyle Eastwood, son of Clint, will gather this week for the 10th annual Cape Town International Jazz Festival. The event, Friday and Saturday, will feature musicians on five stages as well as workshops and classes for budding artists. You can see the list of activities at www.capetownjazzfest.com. Here are five other things to do: 1 Hike Table Mountain : If you're feeling energetic, hike to the top of this plateau that rises 3,566 feet above sea level.
TRAVEL
November 16, 2008
My wife and I live in Baltimore. We visited South Africa in October during its springtime. The scenic beauty of Cape Town, at the southern tip of the African continent, is captured in this photo. I am standing at the top of the 3,500-foot Table Mountain as one of the Aerial Cableway cars nears the top of the mountain. The cable car rotates 360 degrees as it ascends and descends, so everyone gets a great view. The mountain peak in the distance above Cape Town is called Lion's Head, as it resembles a reclined king of the jungle.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to The Sun | April 6, 2008
It's been nearly two decades since Nelson Mandela was freed from prison. Four years after his 1990 release, he became the president of South Africa and led his country into desegregated democracy. In his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, Mandela said, "There's no use to dwell in the past. Only remember it, so you can avoid these same mistakes. To build a new future, dwell in the present." Taking Mandela's words to heart, his beloved country has moved forward. No one has forgotten apartheid, of course.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | November 27, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The stereotypes are nasty: Zimbabweans steal jobs; Nigerians deal drugs; Somali merchants force local shops out of business with cut-rate prices. These are some of the generalizations that contribute to a rising tide of xenophobia that is directed mainly at other Africans. The sentiment against foreigners is starkly at odds with the post-apartheid image of South Africa as a "rainbow nation" with arms open to people of every race, ethnicity and nationality.
FEATURES
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 4, 1998
CAPE TOWN, S. Africa -- Internationally shunned during the shameful years of apartheid, this "Mother City" of South Africa is these days becoming an increasingly popular destination for foreign visitors.It's hardly surprising, of course, given its breathtaking setting beneath Table Mountain and the myriad attractions it can offer, from palm-fringed, white-sand beaches to wild nature reserves, from gorgeous vineyards to a dazzling Water Front mall.To show how pent-up was the overseas demand for travel here, in the 12 months after the 1994 election of the country's first majority black government under President Nelson Mandela, tourism to Cape Town jumped a staggering 49 percent.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,[Special to the Sun ] | November 5, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA // When my husband and I moved to the heart of South Africa from Baltimore, we were terrified. We had heard stories about big, bad, scary Johannesburg and kept our eyes peeled for attackers with AK-47s. We locked and double locked our doors. We lived behind a security wall and kept our electric fence on. We had come to post-apartheid South Africa for my husband's work as a foreign correspondent for The Sun and accepted that living in Johannesburg was part of the deal.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,[Special to the Sun ] | November 5, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA // When my husband and I moved to the heart of South Africa from Baltimore, we were terrified. We had heard stories about big, bad, scary Johannesburg and kept our eyes peeled for attackers with AK-47s. We locked and double locked our doors. We lived behind a security wall and kept our electric fence on. We had come to post-apartheid South Africa for my husband's work as a foreign correspondent for The Sun and accepted that living in Johannesburg was part of the deal.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- After yelling to his brother that a great white shark was swimming his way, Achmat Hassiem watched as it changed course - toward him. The 13-foot shark bit his foot, shook violently and took him under. Seconds later, Hassiem was pulled into a nearby boat, alive but missing his right foot. The August episode in False Bay was the most recent in a string of great white incidents around Cape Town that have stirred emotions about a creature often demonized, intensifying a debate over how to balance safety and conservation.
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