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By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | April 1, 2001
WILMINGTON, N.C. - Teams of divers, led by the University of North Carolina at Wilmington's National Undersea Research Center, will soon begin the final stages of retrieving major portions of the wreck of the USS Monitor for permanent display in a safer home ashore. Soon after its battle with the Confederate ironclad, CSS Virginia, the Union ironclad Monitor sank in stormy seas 16 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C., in 1862. In the 1970s, the wreck site became the nation's first National Marine Sanctuary.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Hurricane Arthur is expected to brush the Outer Banks of North Carolina early on the Fourth of July, but forecasts are only taking it further from the Delmarva coast after that. Hurricane warnings are in effect for coastal North Carolina, and the storm could pack 85 mph winds by the time its outer bands reach land early Friday. Arthur had 80 mph winds and was 300 miles southwest of Cape Hatteras as of 8 a.m. Thursday. Authorities had on Wednesday begun closing campgrounds, lighthouses and beaches on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
Imagine picking up a set of encyclopedia stacked way up over your head and carrying it across the room.Now imagine the stack is 200 feet tall, weighs 8.8 million pounds, and you have to carry it across more than a half-mile of sand. Oh, and the entire country will be watching to see if you drop it.That's the task facing the International Chimney Corp. and its Maryland subcontractor this week as they prepare to move the 129-year-old Cape Hatteras Lighthouse -- the tallest brick lighthouse in the world -- back from the encroaching surf.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Eleven years ago, Navy Capt. Barbara "Bobbie" Scholley dived more than 230 feet into the ocean to help bring back the past: two sailors killed when their Civil War battleship sank in 1862. On Friday, the Annapolis woman joined the crew members' descendants and dignitaries to usher them into eternity. The two sailors, whose remains were recovered from the wreckage of the USS Monitor in 2002, were buried at Arlington on Friday, 151 years after the ship battled the Confederate ironclad Virginia in the critical Battle of Hampton Roads, which revolutionized naval warfare.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2003
An unlikely discovery in France's naval archives has put American researchers hot on the trail of the Union submarine Alligator, the U.S. Navy's first commissioned submarine and the first to enter a combat zone. Unlike its Confederate counterpart, the H.L. Hunley, the ill-fated Alligator didn't sink any ships or kill anybody, either enemy sailors or its own crew. And when it was lost in a fierce storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C., in 1863, it was nearly lost to history as well. A recent discovery in the French archives of the vessel's blueprints, however, has stimulated new interest in the ship and has prompted federal authorities to try to find and raise it. The search is also sparking interest in the vessel's mysterious creator, Brutus De Villeroi, an eccentric Frenchman who listed his occupation on the 1860 census as "natural genius."
NEWS
By Reed Hellman and Reed Hellman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 2000
TOPSAIL, N.C. - At first glance, this story is about nine sea turtles: Five massive loggerheads, three highly endangered Kemp's ridleys and a little green named Cheesecake. All had been found in distress - suffering from maladies ranging from hypothermia to injuries that came from collisions with commercial fishing nets. All got a second chance on life at the Topsail Beach Sea Turtle Hospital in this oceanfront enclave. Late last month, after the ocean temperature reached 75 degrees, the nine were sent back to the sea - a small victory for preservation.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 7, 2002
OFF CAPE HATTERAS, N.C. - In the Graveyard of the Atlantic at 40 fathoms deep, the water is mysterious and teasing. Churned up by the contrary paths of the Gulf Stream and Labrador Current, it can be clear and warm one moment, then cold and murky the next with sudden shifts of blue and green marking the endless shoving match between powerful, river-like forces. Inside the Johnson Sea Link II, however, all seems quiet and still as pilot Phil Santos calmly guides his 29,000-pound submersible through the quarrelsome currents toward the ocean floor.
NEWS
April 7, 1999
The beacon atop the nation's tallest lighthouse is out for the first time since 1950 as movers prepare to move the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse inland. The 208-foot-tall structure with its barber- pole striping is being moved 2,900 feet to preserve it from the Atlantic Ocean, which has crept within 120 feet. Aside from light bulbs burning out, the beacon has operated continuously since 1950. The beacon once helped sailors navigate the often treacherous waters off Cape Hatteras, N.C., known as the "Graveyard of the Atlantic."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1994
Clarksville Middle School played host last week to some 40 North Carolina students whose school was badly damaged by Hurricane Emily late last summer.The Cape Hatteras School's entire eighth grade visited as part of the Lighthouse Exchange, a Clarksville-sponsored program that raised more than $5,000 to pay their travel expenses.While Clarksville students got the chance to give their visitors hometown hospitality, they also fulfilled the state's new community service requirement for high school graduation.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1996
Hurricane Edouard's approach is likely to kick up dangerous surf, high tides and coastal flooding at the beaches this Labor Day weekend. The National Weather Service has begun to urge the expected crowds of holiday boaters and beachgoers to be careful.Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center also said yesterday that chances were growing that the storm would lose its steering currents in the coming days and become "extremely unpredictable.""Since it can do almost anything, we could have the whole eastern seaboard under the gun from a big hurricane, with tons of people at beaches," said meteorologist Mike Hopkins.
MOBILE
August 26, 2011
From the Maryland Weather blog : Hurricane Irene, packing 110 mph winds, heavy rain and a 4 to 8-foot storm surge, continues to bear down on eastern North Carolina, southeastern Virginia and Maryland this morning. Hurricane Warnings now stretch from North Carolina to New Jersey, including the Maryland and Delaware resorts. Baltimore and the entire Western Shore of Maryland - and the Eastern Shore inland from the beaches, are under a Tropical Storm Warning. Tropical storm conditions are now expected by Saturday from Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties, south and east.Irene severity The National Weather Service forecast office in Sterling, Va. says winds at BWI-Marshall Airport will pick up Saturday afternoon, with sustained winds increasing to 24 to 29 mph Saturday, gusting to 34. Saturday night, winds will increase to between 37 and 47 mph, gusting to 54 mph. The Western Shore region should also be prepared for 6 to 8 inches of rain through Sunday, with more to the east.
TRAVEL
By Diane Stoneback and Diane Stoneback,Morning Call | September 9, 2007
THE LIGHTHOUSES ALONG NEW JERSEY'S shore are so much more than photographs on souvenir postcards, subjects for paintings and models for light-catchers in kitchen windows. Although often overshadowed at vacation time by beaches, sun and seashells, they have stories to tell to all who are willing to listen. Just as surely as waves roll in and rake sand and shells into their swirling grasp for an instant, exploring the state's lighthouses is like breezing into history at full sail. "The lighthouses represent the maritime history of the nation, when wooden ships were sailed by iron men," says Brett Franks, spokesman for the 1,000-member New Jersey Lighthouse Society.
NEWS
By JASON SKOG and JASON SKOG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2006
A narrow chain of barrier islands, North Carolina's Outer Banks offers panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean on one side and serene bays and waterways on the other, as well as wildlife refuges and maritime woodlands. The area also includes Kitty Hawk, the birthplace of flight, and Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The Outer Banks has 15 towns along the length of the islands. Dining, recreation and shopping opportunities are growing, thanks to a recent building boom. Where to stay Most Outer Banks visitors stay in one of the abundant vacation homes, many of which are worth more than $1 million and feature five, six or seven bedrooms, in-ground pools, hot tubs and modern kitchens.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2003
An unlikely discovery in France's naval archives has put American researchers hot on the trail of the Union submarine Alligator, the U.S. Navy's first commissioned submarine and the first to enter a combat zone. Unlike its Confederate counterpart, the H.L. Hunley, the ill-fated Alligator didn't sink any ships or kill anybody, either enemy sailors or its own crew. And when it was lost in a fierce storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C., in 1863, it was nearly lost to history as well. A recent discovery in the French archives of the vessel's blueprints, however, has stimulated new interest in the ship and has prompted federal authorities to try to find and raise it. The search is also sparking interest in the vessel's mysterious creator, Brutus De Villeroi, an eccentric Frenchman who listed his occupation on the 1860 census as "natural genius."
NEWS
By Stephen Braun and John-Thor Dahlburg and Stephen Braun and John-Thor Dahlburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - Hurricane Isabel was churning yesterday on course for a potentially destructive landfall along the Atlantic seaboard, as U.S. Coast Guard officials repositioned rescue vessels and nervous residents descended on hardware stores and food markets from the Carolinas to Maryland. Public-safety officials ordered the evacuation of nearly 1,000 residents from an isolated island in North Carolina's Outer Banks, and Virginia's governor declared a state of emergency. In Chesapeake, Va., a hardware store owner threatened to summon police to quell customers' squabbling over batteries and emergency generators.
NEWS
By William J. Broad and William J. Broad,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 2002
After 140 years at the bottom of the sea, the 160-ton gun turret of the USS Monitor is to be lifted into daylight soon off Cape Hatteras, N.C., in the culmination of a five-year, $14 million effort to save the famous ironclad. The federal-private project will then enter a new phase, to bring much of what remains of the Monitor, a revolutionary warship and a Civil War relic, back to life. Experts are treating more than 400 Monitor artifacts to try to reverse the corrosive effects of time and seawater.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1996
Keep your shovels handy. Maryland could get at least a couple of inches more snow by Friday.Even as Marylanders were digging out yesterday from their third-deepest snowfall of the century, weather forecasters were picking up early warnings that another storm might be headed this way.It's too early to be sure, but indications are that the new snowstorm -- if it hits at all -- will be tame compared with the blizzard that buried the region over the weekend.The...
FEATURES
By Bryan MacKay and Bryan MacKay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1998
Running the river wild; My favorite placeI sit in my kayak in the calm water just above the rapid, craning my neck to see over the horizon line. Only the flat water at the bottom is visible; the rapid is too steep to see a safe route. Cliffs rise directly from the water on both sides, so there's no possibility of portaging or getting out to look. Standard advice for kayakers in this situation: paddle hard and, to use the well-worn cliche that originated with whitewater paddlers, "Go for it."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
HATTERAS, N.C. - Just after midnight on the last day of 1862, the U.S. Navy's famed ironclad warship, the USS Monitor, foundered while under tow in a storm off Cape Hatteras. Sea water poured in under the ship's 22-foot-wide rotating gun turret. It doused the ship's boilers, silenced its steam engine and stilled its pumps. The Monitor - veteran of the historic clash with the Confederate ironclad Merrimac 10 months earlier - was sinking, and its sailors were scrambling to escape their iron coffin before it plunged 220 feet to the bottom.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 7, 2002
OFF CAPE HATTERAS, N.C. - In the Graveyard of the Atlantic at 40 fathoms deep, the water is mysterious and teasing. Churned up by the contrary paths of the Gulf Stream and Labrador Current, it can be clear and warm one moment, then cold and murky the next with sudden shifts of blue and green marking the endless shoving match between powerful, river-like forces. Inside the Johnson Sea Link II, however, all seems quiet and still as pilot Phil Santos calmly guides his 29,000-pound submersible through the quarrelsome currents toward the ocean floor.
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