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By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
Wallops Island, Va. - - There isn't much to see yet at the grandly named Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, just the skeleton of an old launch gantry on a piece of oceanfront leased from the federal government. But promoters expect something remarkable to blossom on this sun-baked spit of sand and scrub on the Eastern Shore. David Smith, a state official from Virginia, which joined with Maryland six years ago to operate a commercial spaceflight center with the lofty acronym MARS, says the area is on track to become "the Cape Canaveral of the North."
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Maryland officials should get more economic bang from the Wallops Flight Facility — just over the line in Virginia — by capitalizing on space tourism and the potential from unmanned aircraft, according to a new study. The report, commissioned by the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, said the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's complex on Wallops Island already has an effect on Maryland's Eastern Shore. But there's potential for more. One possibility: attracting more people to see rockets blasted into space from Wallops.
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NEWS
February 6, 1992
A. Isabella Clarke, who painted in oils and wrote poetry, died Monday at a Cape Canaveral, Fla., hospital of complications from a broken hip. She was 96.A Mass of Christian burial for Mrs. Clarke, who had lived in Cape Canaveral since 1990, will be offered at 11 a.m. Saturday at St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church, Willow Avenue and Belair Road in Overlea.She is survived by three sons, Emerson V. Clarke Jr. of Pylesville, Carroll Anthony Clarke of Cape Canaveral and Edward Jefferson Clarke of Baltimore; 16 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Joan B. McClernan, a retired real estate broker and animal lover, died May 23 of complications from chronic pulmonary obstructive disease at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 79. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Joan Brown was born and raised in Media, Pa., and graduated in 1951 from Radnor High School. She worked as a secretary in Philadelphia, and after her marriage to an aerospace engineer, lived in Cape Canaveral, Fla., and Detroit. She moved to Monkton in the early 1960s when her husband took a job with the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River.
NEWS
March 31, 2006
RICHARD ALAN HARLOW, age 69, passed away on Monday, 27 March at Cape Canaveral Hospital. Born November 10, 1936, he spent most of his life in Baltimore, MD. He graduated from Towson High School in 1954 and served in the U.S. Army. After a career in retail sales, he made his home for the last 10 years in Cape Canaveral, FL, and was a member of the Royal Order of the Moose. He is survived by his brother, Robert W. Harlow of Red Wing , MN, his sister, Hope Harlow Coleman of Oviedo, FL, his beloved friend, Margaret Joyce, of Cape Canaveral, FL, his four children Mark Harlow, Brett Harlow, Todd Harlow, and Beth Harlow Buckalew and six grandchildren, all of the greater Baltimore , MD area.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 18, 2006
ORLANDO, Fla. -- NASA will try again today to launch its New Horizons spacecraft on a nine-year journey to Pluto, with a planned 1:16 p.m. liftoff from Cape Canaveral. A launch attempt was canceled yesterday because of high winds, and forecasters are calling for a 70 percent chance of good conditions today. Isolated thunderstorms and high winds are the main concerns. The $700 million mission has until Feb. 14 to launch. If all goes well, the spacecraft will fly near Pluto in 2015 and gather the first close-up images and data on the icy world.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 28, 2003
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - NASA is poised to dispatch tonight the second of two robot geologists on a $400 million mission to Mars. The Opportunity rover - also known as Mars Exploration Rover-B - will look for evidence of past liquid water on the planet's surface. The goal is to answer one of science's big questions: Were conditions present elsewhere in the universe for life to evolve? Water is considered an essential ingredient for life as we know it. To reach the Martian surface, Opportunity must complete a looping 298 million-mile, seven-month journey, then safely land.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
On July 25, 2005, CARROLL A. in Cape Canaveral, FL, beloved husband of Clarissa M. (nee Schweizer) devoted father of Carroll, Jr., Gregory, Patrick, Brian, Mary, Therese and Kathleen, devoted grandfather of Erin, Katie, Kelly, Emily, Stephanie and Earle. Carroll was a Navy Veteran of WW II as well as a retired Laboratory Design Engineer and avid wood worker. He and his wife were members of Our Savior Catholic Church, in Coco Beach, FL. A Christian Wake Service will be held at the Lassahn Funeral Home, Inc., 7401 Belair Road (Overlea)
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,Orlando Sentinel | September 3, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- For the second time in 10 days, shuttle Atlantis' six astronauts flew into the Kennedy Space Center yesterday to prepare for a scheduled launch this week. The countdown toward Wednesday's planned 12:28 p.m. liftoff is set to begin at 8 a.m. this morning. Forecasters are predicting typical summer weather at Cape Canaveral on launch day: high temperatures in the upper 80s with partly cloudy skies and a 40 percent chance of scattered thunderstorms. Nature has been uncooperative with NASA's attempts to launch the shuttle on an important 11-day construction mission to the International Space Station.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- With high hopes for her future, marine scientists returned Inky the whale to her Atlantic Ocean home yesterday -- after her recovery from an overdose of pollution.The well-traveled whale, rescued from a New Jersey beach on Thanksgiving and nursed back to health in a five-month stay at Baltimore's National Aquarium, was taken into deep water about 35 miles east of Cape Canaveral by a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration vessel and given her freedom.Inky immediately dispelled the fears of aquarium officials that she would be slow to adapt and simply swim around in circles waiting for a food handout.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
Weather postponed Tuesday's launch of the ORS-1 satellite attached to the Minotaur 1 rocket, according to NASA officials, leaving spectators in the Mid-Atlantic to wait for another day. The ORS-1 launch was scheduled between 8:28 p.m. and 11:28 p.m., from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport Virginia's Wallops Island which will be visible between South Carolina up to New York and as far west as West Virginia. Officials said that if the launch was scrubbed, subsequent attempts will follow nightly through July 10, except for a three-day window around the planned launch of the space shuttle Atlantis from Cape Canaveral, Fla., set for July 8. The Air Force will launch the battlefield imaging satellite into orbit the first operational version of the Air Force's Operationally Responsive Space satellite series.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
Wallops Island, Va. - - There isn't much to see yet at the grandly named Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, just the skeleton of an old launch gantry on a piece of oceanfront leased from the federal government. But promoters expect something remarkable to blossom on this sun-baked spit of sand and scrub on the Eastern Shore. David Smith, a state official from Virginia, which joined with Maryland six years ago to operate a commercial spaceflight center with the lofty acronym MARS, says the area is on track to become "the Cape Canaveral of the North."
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 1, 2007
CAPE CANAVERAL -- NASA has delayed space shuttle Atlantis' planned March 15 launch until at least late April to fix hail damage to the ship's external fuel tank. A ferocious thunderstorm packing 62-mph gusts pelted Launch Pad 39A with golf-ball-size hailstones Monday, carving an estimated 7,000 divots in the foam insulation that covers the giant tank. Engineers must repair hundreds of the worst gouges and minor damage to about 27 heat-resistant tiles on Atlantis' left wing before the shuttle is allowed to fly. "This constitutes, in our evaluation, the worst damage that we have ever seen from hail on the external-tank foam," said Wayne Hale, NASA's space shuttle program manager.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 22, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Discovery could return home today to an unusual sort of white Christmas that NASA managers want to avoid. Only once in 114 previous landings has the shuttle touched down at the White Sands Missile Range in southern New Mexico, a blanched desert of gypsum sand so desolate that the first atomic bomb was detonated there. White Sands' Northrup Strip traditionally has been viewed by NASA as a shuttle runway of last resort, available in case circumstances prevented a return to primary landing sites at the Kennedy Space Center or Southern California's Edwards Air Force Base.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Robyn Shelton and Michael Cabbage and Robyn Shelton,Orlando Sentinel | September 21, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Atlantis is heading home this morning after a late inspection of the ship's heat shielding yesterday found nothing wrong. The inspection was prompted by Tuesday's sighting of an unknown object that apparently shook loose from Atlantis during prelanding checkouts of the shuttle's body flaps and steering thrusters. Eight hours of surveys using cameras on Atlantis' robot arm and a sensor-laden 50-foot boom did not detect any sign the object was dislodged from the ship's critical heat armor.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 7, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A problem with the system that provides power to the shuttle caused NASA yesterday to once again delay the launch of the space shuttle Atlantis. Space agency managers were scheduled to meet today in hopes of clearing the way for a launch tomorrow. The launch was only hours away yesterday morning when engineers reported a short in one of three fuel cells that supply electricity for all the onboard systems, including the crew compartment. Although the systems are redundant, the launch was scrubbed out of fear that a problem in one generating system could appear in others.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 1993
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The space shuttle Columbia was poised yesterday to begin the longest flight of the shuttle program, a two-week mission dedicated to medical experiments involving seven astronauts and 48 rats.Officials at the Kennedy Space Center said no technical problems stood in the way of today's launch of Columbia, at 10:53 a.m., on its 15th mission into space.The main concern was the weather. While predicting a 90 percent chance of good weather at launching time, Air Force forecasters said conditions at three overseas emergency landing sites raised the possibility of a delay.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 12, 1994
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Discovery and its U.S.-Russian crew returned safely to earth yesterday after a symbolically important but operationally unsuccessful mission.Announcing its approach with a trademark double sonic boom, the shuttle landed smoothly at the Kennedy Space Center at 2:19 p.m., ending an eight-day, 3.4 million-mile flight."You've paved the way for a new era of cooperation in human space flight," Mission Control told Discovery's five American astronauts and one Russian cosmonaut.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,Orlando Sentinel | September 3, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- For the second time in 10 days, shuttle Atlantis' six astronauts flew into the Kennedy Space Center yesterday to prepare for a scheduled launch this week. The countdown toward Wednesday's planned 12:28 p.m. liftoff is set to begin at 8 a.m. this morning. Forecasters are predicting typical summer weather at Cape Canaveral on launch day: high temperatures in the upper 80s with partly cloudy skies and a 40 percent chance of scattered thunderstorms. Nature has been uncooperative with NASA's attempts to launch the shuttle on an important 11-day construction mission to the International Space Station.
NEWS
By MICHAEL CABBAGE AND ROBYN SHELTON | July 18, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL -- NASA's efforts to put the International Space Station program back on track took a major step forward yesterday with the safe return of the shuttle Discovery after a near-flawless 13-day mission. Astronauts accomplished every objective during their visit to the $100 billion space station, including the deliveries of a new resident and 3 tons of equipment and supplies. The flight's larger significance, however, might be that it positions the space agency to begin a final push of 15 more missions needed to finish the station before the planned retirement of the shuttles in 2010.
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