Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCanvassing
IN THE NEWS

Canvassing

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Stephanie Desmon and David Nitkin and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 26, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Steamy South Florida grew hotter yesterday as ballot counters in Broward and Palm Beach counties sprinted toward today's 5 p.m. deadline for completing manual recounts of contested presidential ballots. As demonstrators faced off in the streets and national political leaders scrutinized ballot counters' work, canvassing board members in the two counties continued to try to determine the will of voters by examining tiny marks on punch ballots, sometimes using magnifying glasses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2012
Following a house fire in Northeast Baltimore that killed a grandmother and four of her grandchildren last week, city firefighters will canvass the entire city on Sunday and install smoke alarms wherever they are needed. "This creates an opportunity to interact with the public that we serve and more importantly install an early warning device (smoke alarm) in conjunction with a home evacuation plan to keep residents safe from the dangers of home fires," Chief Kevin Cartwright, a spokesman for the department, said in a statement.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 25, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Democratic and Republican attorneys squared off over dimpled ballots in Palm Beach County yesterday, launching a grueling day of hand-counting during which Vice President Al Gore appeared to pick up a few dozen votes. Democrats enlisted the 83-year-old inventor of the punch-hole voting machine and a former Palm Beach County elections supervisor to testify how aging equipment could have caused thousands of voters to miscast their presidential selections. Even slightly indented punch ballots should be counted, they told the three-member county canvassing board.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
Candidates in Maryland's competitive political contests fanned out across the state for a final weekend of handshaking ahead of Tuesday's primary, hoping to gin up interest in an election that has largely failed to capture voters' attention. They spoke at forums, attended rallies and walked through battleground neighborhoods knocking on doors, leaving trails of colorful campaign literature and yard signs behind as they raced to the next event. The main mission: Reminding supporters to turn out. At stake in Tuesday's primary election are the Democratic and Republican nominations for a nationally significant House of Representatives seat in Western Maryland and up to 37 delegates that voters will award to one or more of the GOP presidential candidates.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 25, 2000
TALLAHASSEE - As prominent Republicans accused Democrats of scheming to disenfranchise voters in the military, a state judge signaled yesterday that he would likely deny a Republican request to force 13 Florida counties to accept hundreds of rejected overseas absentee ballots, most of them from the armed forces. Judge L. Ralph Smith of Leon County Circuit Court said he would issue a written ruling after reviewing the case, but said he had heard no evidence that any of the canvassing boards had violated the law in tossing out more than 1,400 absentee ballots for the presidency because of postmark, signature and registration problems.
NEWS
November 27, 2000
Here is the text of yesterday's certification of the Florida presidential vote by Katherine Harris, Florida secretary of state, as reported by the Associated Press. Good evening. Commissioner Bob Crawford, Director Clay Roberts, ladies and gentlemen, as the state Elections Canvassing Commission, we're here today to certify the results of the election that occurred Nov. 7, 2000. Because of the great interest in our actions, we are meeting publicly rather than individually, as has been our traditional practice.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 22, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Before the Florida Supreme Court issued its opinion last night authorizing further hand recounts, Vice President Al Gore had picked up 278 votes during manual recounts in three south Florida counties. If recorded, those ballots would reduce Texas Gov. George W. Bush's lead in Florida to just 652 votes. But don't forget the dimples. Democrats contended Gore will overtake Bush - if canvassers count hundreds more ballots with "dimpled chads," voting cards that weren't punched with enough force to register as a vote.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - In a ruling that Democrats at first believed boosted Vice President Al Gore's chance to claim the White House, Palm Beach County Circuit Judge Jorge Labarga said yesterday that elections officials should consider everything - including so-called "dimples" - in awarding presidential votes. But Judge Charles Burton, chairman of the county's canvassing board, said Labarga's ruling changes nothing and the board will likely not change the way it has been counting ballots, a count that has done little to boost Gore's position.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Warning of a potential "constitutional crisis," Texas Gov. George W. Bush asked the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday to strike down manual recounts in Florida - clearing the way for Bush to win the presidency. "This is a case of the utmost national importance," lawyers for Bush argued in papers that took the dispute to the Supreme Court for the first time. "The outcome of the election for the presidency of the United States may hang in the balance." If the justices do not step in, his attorneys said, "the consequence may be the ascension of a president of questionable legitimacy or a constitutional crisis."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - There was the breakfast spread before 7 a.m.: bagels and Danish and bananas. Then they were fed and ready for a long day of counting Palm Beach County's 430,000 ballots - ballots that could mean the difference in one of the tightest presidential races in history. Another day, another day of confusion, another day of counting lost. The 50 people who volunteered for a week's worth of counting cards learned before 8 a.m. yesterday that there would be a delay: The county's Canvassing Board wouldn't start until a local judge determined whether they should count so-called "dimpled ballots," those that aren't punched all the way through but seem to show who a voter preferred.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Anne Arundel police spent much of Friday morning investigating reports of slashed tires in Brooklyn Park. Neighbors of several streets in the Arundel Village area, near the city line, began realizing their tires had been slashed at about 8 a.m. Officers found more than 30 vehicles damaged during the overnight hours in the 500 block of Taney Avenue, the 5200 block of Kramme Avenue, the 5200 block of Ballman Avenue, the 5000 and 5100 blocks of Brookwood...
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
After a man was beaten to death early Saturday morning in what police call a hate crime— the latest in a string of attacks against Hispanics in the area — officers and neighborhood volunteers walked door-to-door to promote a dialogue with police and the Spanish-speaking community. Saturday night, police had made an arrest in the overnight killing in the 200 block of N. Kenwood Ave. Officers were called at about 2:15 a.m. for an assault and found 51-year-old Martin Reyez suffering from severe head and facial trauma after he was beaten with a piece of wood.
NEWS
By Diana Nguyen and Diana Nguyen,Capital News Service | January 25, 2010
Hermine Duebsie needs this job. She holds her application and I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification Form in hand and waits for a proctor from the U.S. Census Bureau to administer a basic skills test. The test, meant to be fairly simple - gauging skills in reading, basic math, map reading and following instructions - is a deciding factor in securing a part-time, six-to-10-week interviewer's job with a flexible schedule and $18.50 an hour, a rate that varies by location. "The pay is great, and it's a government job. I think this job is most important," said Duebsie, a Montgomery County Community College student with no other source of income.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | January 13, 2010
Census Bureau officials opened a second office in Baltimore on Tuesday and expect to hire about 1,200 temporary employees to canvass the city and collect demographic data. The office, at 205 S. President St., will serve as headquarters for operations on the eastern side of the city. Fernando E. Armstrong, regional director for the Census Bureau, said the federal government has started accepting applications for the jobs and will hire people at the end of March for stints ranging from five weeks to three months, depending on the nature of the work.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | January 27, 2007
Alice Jackson could tell that the woman was depressed. With some gentle questioning, Jackson found out that she was 42 years old, the mother of three grown children and homeless. "Where did you spend last night?" Jackson asked. "At a friend's house," the woman responded. "A place I don't want to be - a crack house." Jackson noted the woman's response on a survey form and told her that there was a shelter nearby, a place that Jackson had also visited when she was a homeless drug addict.
NEWS
January 3, 2006
Harford County authorities canvassed the Fountain Green community near Bel Air last night where worshippers were robbed of their cash and valuables during a New Year's Day service, a spokesman for the county Sheriff's Office said. Sheriff deputies and investigators are searching for a gunman who interrupted the evening service attended by about 50 people at Mount Zion United Methodist Church in the 1600 block of Churchville Road, said Bob Thomas, the sheriff's spokesman. "It's standard police practice to contact area residents and find out if they saw anything or heard anything unusual," Thomas said.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 27, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - The fax machine brought the news: An all-nighter, a strict diet of almond M&M's and bottled water, and a furious last gasp at trying to whip through the last dwindling stacks of Palm Beach County's 466,000 ballots wouldn't be enough to finish on time. The county canvassing board had pleaded with Secretary of State Katherine Harris earlier in the afternoon, asking for a few more hours to finish tallying by hand the county's votes for president, votes that were being counted with the help of hundreds of volunteers for 10 days.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 3, 2000
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - Displaying statistical charts and voting machines brimming with chads, two expert witnesses for Vice President Al Gore testified yesterday about the likelihood that a machine count of Election Day ballots overlooked votes for president. The testimony in Gore's election contest underscored his claim that Florida's certified vote count excluded votes that were legally cast for president in the Nov. 7 election. Gore's lawyers hope the evidence will convince Leon County Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls to order an immediate hand count of 14,000 disputed ballots.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
Gavin Brooks stands at her easel, waiting for the cows to come out of the shade. Soon enough they do, but they're at her feet, sniffing her oil paints, apparently to see whether the tubes might taste good. And before she's finished mixing the colors for the tree-covered ridge across the meadow, a flock of chickens comes stampeding toward her. She has to laugh. She wanted nature. She's got it. The Towson artist is willing to travel across the country for these kinds of exchanges, for chickens and horses to sketch, for a view of an open field.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.