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By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | June 21, 1993
Artist Helen Glazer's new canvas is quite a challenge. It's three stories high, 60 feet across and took 7 gallons of paint to cover.And she has to climb scaffolding to paint the top, where she can look down on the traffic heading through West Baltimore.This is Ms. Glazer's first adventure in mural painting. And her canvas is the cinder-block side wall of the rowhouse at 1224 W. Lombard St.Her painting of the night sky with her own interpretation of the constellations will be one of dozens of murals on buildings and bridges in the city.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Seth Adelsberger is a 34-year-old Baltimore painter and printmaker. He does not have a master's degree from an art school, he is not represented by a gallery, and he has not won a prestigious prize. Nonetheless, on Sunday, a solo show that distills Adelsberger's visual experiments over the past five years opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The exhibit is an unusual honor for an unproven painter, signaling to the art world nationwide that museum curators think Adelsberger is a talent worth watching.
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NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
A giant canvas. Buckets of paint. A challenge. Artist Monica Weidel stood at the front of her Artscape booth along Mount Royal Avenue yesterday, beckoning everyone in to grab a brush, dip it into some paint and reveal one word - any word they like - that describes Baltimore. As the throngs passed by, one by one taking Weidel up on her challenge, words and colors began to crowd the canvas. Great. Baseball. Home. Fun-kae. Without much hesitation, one tall man ducked into the shade of the booth, dipped a paintbrush into a canister of bright blue, then found an open corner to begin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
With a loaded title and a heavy foot in ancient Greek mythology, Bob Bartlett's new play "Bareback Ink" offers an intriguing take on sexual attraction and coercion, genuine and forced relationships, alienation and fear. Iron Crow Theatre Company has given the work a tense, thoughtful staging at JHU's tucked-away Swirnow Theatre, directed by Ryan Clark and designed by Heather Mork. It may not persuade you that Bartlett has penned a masterpiece, but the combination of solid acting and production values (most notably the atmospheric contributions from lighting designer Alec Lawson and sound designer Jessye Black)
NEWS
January 10, 2000
Police Westminster: A resident of Wampler Lane told police Thursday that someone took the canvas top from his vehicle. Loss was estimated at $1,000.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 5, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- The Carroll County Arts Council's new gallery will open in Sozra sound and a burst of abstract art at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.Hilary Pierce, the council's executive director, chose a multimedia sight and sound performance for the opening of the group's new center at 15 E. Main St."The Sozra Sound Project: Exploring the Origins of Creativity and the Influence of Sound," by John M. Sosnowsky of Union Bridge, features a 7-by-12-foot canvas painted by six area artists and a video detailing the painting's creation.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
They sit hunched over a single needlepoint canvas that is bathed in astoundingly bright light, fingers flying. "Where am I? My needle is under here," Joy Wiley of Lothian says to herself as she stops to examine her work while feeling around beneath the canvas for her dangling yarn and needle. "We hate these tails," says Sheryn Blocher of Crownsville with a sigh, glaring at what look like weeds standing up from the canvas. She will imperceptibly secure the base of each wisp of yarn, or tail, before trimming it away.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 31, 1994
Bryan Loane doesn't need a thermometer to tell the temperature.His customers inform him when it gets hot.Let the Baltimore mercury bounce above the 80-degree mark and people want awnings. These shamelessly old-fashioned canvas shades are custom tailored and then strung on ropes and poles around porches, windows and doors.Mr. Loane, 31, takes the heat and the persistence of his patrons in stride. Six generations of his family have been keeping Baltimoreans contentedly in the dark. The Loanes have been making tents, awnings, canvas products and flags since 1815.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | June 15, 1997
Sometime last Sunday afternoon, I settled in to the reality that those long, hot days of sitting under the summer awning had finally arrived.A big, old porch awning is like a tent, without the mess of camping. There is no effect quite like the sheltering, safe and cozy feel that yards of slightly translucent floppy fabric provide when loosely stretched over a heavy metal frame.I've always lived in a house with an awning -- a summertime awning, one that gets installed before school lets out and is taken down and stored about the time the pennant race gets interesting.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | November 4, 1994
Karin Birch first embraced fiber art six years ago with a whimsical painting she titled "Ode to Housework."She affixed tiny beads to the canvas in the shape of irons -- and rather fancied the results."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
During a dark time in her life, Baltimore artist Meg Page sought solace by a pond and took the time to look into the eyes of nature. "There was this frog, and the specks of gold in his eyes were so spectacular that my heart lifted in the moment," she said. Also in that moment, nature changed from being her comforter to being her muse, and almost 20 years ago, the career of one of the country's great naturalist illustrators was launched. "It's all right here for us, this beauty.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
In the manner of "when the world gives you lemons, make lemonade," when the garden gives Sherrill Cooper problems, she makes art. For the 25 years she and her family have lived at this house, the Finksburg artist has treated every problem as a creative opportunity, and the result is a yard where whimsy masks the spots where nature has refused to cooperate. A sundial hides the septic tank. A border of broken plates keeps a garden in check, and old-fashioned porcelain spigots grow in a window box where nothing else will.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Bill Gant says asking him to choose a favorite plant or a favorite season in his garden is like asking him to choose "among my children. " When Gant and his wife, Nancy, bought their home in 2004, the previous owner had created a place for a large flower bed in the side front lawn, but nothing was planted in it. "The garden was a canvas, my trowel awaiting inspiration," says Gant, a Harford County title researcher who writes poetry in his...
FEATURES
Meghan Leimenstoll | May 28, 2013
Do you need a pop of color in your house? Are your kids craving the chance to get their hands dirty? Problem solved. This project brings out the inner Picasso in your child while ultimately giving you an impressive piece of family art to proudly hang on your wall. Materials: canvas paintbrushes (or hands) of various sizes and shapes craft paint painter's tape or washi tape Directions: 1 Paint the entire canvas with a solid base color (example shown uses white)
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
This year's Baltimore Symphony Decorators' Show House offers not only a look at the latest interior design trends but also a peek into the Timonium home of quarterback great Johnny Unitas. Unitas lived in the five-bedroom house on Timonium Road from 1971, when the he led the Colts to an AFC title match against the Miami Dolphins, until 1988, when he moved to a farm in northern Baltimore County. Unitas died in 2002. His widow, Sandy; daughter, Paige; and son, Chad, and other members of his family, will cut the ribbon to open the show house on April 28, giving visitors the chance see rooms decorated by some of the region's premier designers.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
In the beginning, the search for a new home was all about studio space for artist Tendai Johnson, an instructor at Montgomery College. When his former work space in a large building in Washington's Chinatown was sold and working in his house in the H Street corridor became impossible, he and his family made the move north to Baltimore. Realtor Marci Yankelov of Century 21 found them a three-story stone Victorian townhouse in Baltimore's Reservoir Hill neighborhood. It was love at first sight.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1999
The burning of wintertime socks in Eastport, a decades-old ritual to bid the cold season a defiant good-bye, is no longer the lone harbinger of spring, that favorite season of Chesapeake Bay boaters. Now there's shrink-wrap recycling. Recreational boat owners around Annapolis who have traditionally shielded their craft from harsh winter weather with custom-made canvas or tarp covers increasingly are switching to cheaper plastic wrap, encasing their boats like packages of frozen chicken in the supermarket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
From a distance, Madeleine Keesing's line-drop paintings look like finely woven textiles. Step a little closer and the weave seems to ripple and flow across the surface of the canvas like water in an eddying stream. But look even closer and the undulating lines resolve into hundreds of rows of precisely ordered drops of paint that suggest the elemental stability of atoms in a crystal grid. "People always ask how I do these paintings," Keesing says. "Either they think they must be made by a machine, or they think I squeeze the pigment from the tube directly onto the canvas.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2012
Gaia - a young artist who's the brains behind a massive mural project around Baltimore's Station North neighborhood - likes to say the work isn't a traditional political statement. Yet listen to him talk, and he sounds a little bit like a community organizer with an awful lot of spray paint. "What were doing here is creating a social bridge, connecting different socioeconomic backgrounds," Gaia said of the more than 20 murals and sculpture pieces scattered through the arts district and the nearby Greenmount West neighborhood.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
They sit hunched over a single needlepoint canvas that is bathed in astoundingly bright light, fingers flying. "Where am I? My needle is under here," Joy Wiley of Lothian says to herself as she stops to examine her work while feeling around beneath the canvas for her dangling yarn and needle. "We hate these tails," says Sheryn Blocher of Crownsville with a sigh, glaring at what look like weeds standing up from the canvas. She will imperceptibly secure the base of each wisp of yarn, or tail, before trimming it away.
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