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Canton Railroad

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BUSINESS
February 20, 2000
As head of Canton Railroad Co., John C. Magness finds himself thinking a lot these days about fuel -- and about trucks. He wants to keep customers coming back to the 94-year-old short line that once belonged to Canton Co., developer of industrial land on the harbor's east side during the past century. And that means keeping rail shipping competitive long-term so as not to lose business to trucking. With fuel prices rising, fuel surcharges have been looked at or imposed by the trucking and rail industries.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Canton has traditionally been a blue-collar neighborhood, and for more than 100 years, the Canton Railroad Co. has been a part of that mix, moving freight for local industries and the port of Baltimore. Its locomotives are a familiar — and at times frustrating — sight for those traveling into Canton from the east, where the company's tracks crisscross Boston and O'Donnell streets. Long trains sometimes mean long waits for drivers. John C. Magness, the company's president and CEO, said the state-owned railroad's core mission continues.
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NEWS
May 22, 2010
The problem: On rainy days, a railroad signal malfunctions in the Canton Industrial Area. The back story: Patience is a virtue, but it's hard to ask drivers to be understanding when something is broken. Spencer Simpson Jr. of Hamilton noticed that on particularly wet days, the railroad signal on O'Donnell Street near Oldham Street by the Canton Industrial Area will sometimes start flashing, even when there is no train coming. Drivers obey the signal initially, but eventually disregard it when no locomotive approaches.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
William R. Smith, a career railroader who rose from coach cleaner to head the Canton Railroad Co. and was also a strong advocate for the port of Baltimore, died Saturday from complications of Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Ruxton resident was 83. "Bill was a mentor to me and I always appreciated the confidence he had in me," said John C. Magness, president and chief executive officer of the Canton Railroad Co. "He had a bit of an edge and like Earl Weaver, could be tough but he was always right.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
William R. Smith, a career railroader who rose from coach cleaner to head the Canton Railroad Co. and was also a strong advocate for the port of Baltimore, died Saturday from complications of Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Ruxton resident was 83. "Bill was a mentor to me and I always appreciated the confidence he had in me," said John C. Magness, president and chief executive officer of the Canton Railroad Co. "He had a bit of an edge and like Earl Weaver, could be tough but he was always right.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCa and Deidre Nerreau McCa,be Staff Writer | May 17, 1993
Sleep-deprived Linthicum residents are begging the Mass Transit Administration to keep freight cars off its light rail tracks at night."I haven't had any sleep literally in three weeks," said Theresa Proserpi of Shipley Court. "It's really terrible. It's enough to wake the dead."During a Linthicum-Shipley Improvement Association meeting Wednesday night, Ms. Proserpi and about three dozen of her neighbors complained that since light rail service started in April, noisy freight trains have been forced to run at night, keeping them awake.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2006
We can't let the year end without mentioning the 100th birthday of the Canton Railroad Co. which for some reason or other, passed by in May unnoticed. Since 1906, the Canton's fleet of locomotives and its hearty band of railroaders, has kept freight moving to and from local industries and moving through the port of Baltimore. A visitor to the railroad finds it located in a part of industrial Baltimore that is still hardworking and grimy, while not too far to the west, Edwin F. Hale Sr.'s First Mariner Bank building, a component of his Canton Crossing development, sprawls on a 65-acre waterfront site, a symbol of the new Canton.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2010
The Patapsco & Back Rivers Railroad has never enjoyed the undying veneration and saturated scrutiny by the rail fan community in word and picture, for a variety of reasons. It never had on its tracks the speeding limiteds pulled by powerful locomotives with exotic-sounding names that caught the traveling public's imagination, nor did it ever serve steaming tureens of Terrapin a la Maryland or aged prime Kansas beef in plush dining cars. In fact, when one considers all the railroads that have served Baltimore and environs through the years — the Baltimore & Ohio, Pennsylvania, Western Maryland Railway, the Maryland & Pennsylvania and the Canton Railroad, and now CSX and Norfolk Southern — the least known is the Patapsco & Back Rivers Railroad.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Canton has traditionally been a blue-collar neighborhood, and for more than 100 years, the Canton Railroad Co. has been a part of that mix, moving freight for local industries and the port of Baltimore. Its locomotives are a familiar — and at times frustrating — sight for those traveling into Canton from the east, where the company's tracks crisscross Boston and O'Donnell streets. Long trains sometimes mean long waits for drivers. John C. Magness, the company's president and CEO, said the state-owned railroad's core mission continues.
NEWS
April 27, 2008
On April 22, 2008, JOSEPH; beloved husband of Pearl H. Green. Retired employee of Canton Railroad. Friends may call at the CHATMAN- HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Sunday, 1-8 p.m. Family will receive friends at New Elizabeth Baptist Church, 4901 Park Heights Avenue on Monday, 10 a.m. Funeral Services will begin Monday, 10:30 a.m. Interment Mt. Zion Cemetery.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2010
The Patapsco & Back Rivers Railroad has never enjoyed the undying veneration and saturated scrutiny by the rail fan community in word and picture, for a variety of reasons. It never had on its tracks the speeding limiteds pulled by powerful locomotives with exotic-sounding names that caught the traveling public's imagination, nor did it ever serve steaming tureens of Terrapin a la Maryland or aged prime Kansas beef in plush dining cars. In fact, when one considers all the railroads that have served Baltimore and environs through the years — the Baltimore & Ohio, Pennsylvania, Western Maryland Railway, the Maryland & Pennsylvania and the Canton Railroad, and now CSX and Norfolk Southern — the least known is the Patapsco & Back Rivers Railroad.
NEWS
May 22, 2010
The problem: On rainy days, a railroad signal malfunctions in the Canton Industrial Area. The back story: Patience is a virtue, but it's hard to ask drivers to be understanding when something is broken. Spencer Simpson Jr. of Hamilton noticed that on particularly wet days, the railroad signal on O'Donnell Street near Oldham Street by the Canton Industrial Area will sometimes start flashing, even when there is no train coming. Drivers obey the signal initially, but eventually disregard it when no locomotive approaches.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2006
We can't let the year end without mentioning the 100th birthday of the Canton Railroad Co. which for some reason or other, passed by in May unnoticed. Since 1906, the Canton's fleet of locomotives and its hearty band of railroaders, has kept freight moving to and from local industries and moving through the port of Baltimore. A visitor to the railroad finds it located in a part of industrial Baltimore that is still hardworking and grimy, while not too far to the west, Edwin F. Hale Sr.'s First Mariner Bank building, a component of his Canton Crossing development, sprawls on a 65-acre waterfront site, a symbol of the new Canton.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2000
As head of Canton Railroad Co., John C. Magness finds himself thinking a lot these days about fuel -- and about trucks. He wants to keep customers coming back to the 94-year-old short line that once belonged to Canton Co., developer of industrial land on the harbor's east side during the past century. And that means keeping rail shipping competitive long-term so as not to lose business to trucking. With fuel prices rising, fuel surcharges have been looked at or imposed by the trucking and rail industries.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCa and Deidre Nerreau McCa,be Staff Writer | May 17, 1993
Sleep-deprived Linthicum residents are begging the Mass Transit Administration to keep freight cars off its light rail tracks at night."I haven't had any sleep literally in three weeks," said Theresa Proserpi of Shipley Court. "It's really terrible. It's enough to wake the dead."During a Linthicum-Shipley Improvement Association meeting Wednesday night, Ms. Proserpi and about three dozen of her neighbors complained that since light rail service started in April, noisy freight trains have been forced to run at night, keeping them awake.
NEWS
February 8, 2006
On Sunday, February 5, 2006, DWIGHT WORTH DAVIS, beloved husband of Margaret. Loving father of Dwight W. Davis, Jr., David G. Davis and Barbara Ann Davis; also survived by six grandchildren and one sibling James Davis. Dwight W. Davis was a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and he worked for the Canton Company and Canton Railroad until he retired. A private family memorial service will be held at Dellinger Funeral Home, 5997 S. Main Street, Mt. Jackson, VA 22842 on Thursday, February 9 at 2 P.M. Interment Mt. Jackson Cemetery.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
A Canton Railroad train came off the tracks in Southeast Baltimore on Wednesday morning, according to city fire officials. The train came off the tracks at South Clinton Street around 8:25 a.m., Baltimore City Fire Department spokesman Ian Brennan said. No cars were overturned or damaged, and there was no hazardous materials risk, he said. CSX officials are on the scene, and no injuries have been reported. The railroad crossing was blocked for about 20 minutes, Brennan said. The incident occurred in the vicinity of an area that had previously been closed for water main break repairs, Brennan said.
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