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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
For those of us who grew up in Baltimore, cantaloupe brings back memories of the a-rabs walking down the street with their horse-drawn carts bellowing in that wonderful sing-song cadence to come out for fruit. Going out with my mother to buy fruit (and to water and pet the horse) was always a treat, especially knowing that we'd come home with a cantaloupe. My mother liked it plain with a little salt "to bring out the sweetness," and it was my introduction to the beautiful interplay between sweet and savory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014
One moment changed everything for Max Major. From the age of 12, the mentalist has been practicing the art of magic. But it wasn't until he turned 18 and saw his dad hypnotized to quit smoking that he realized magic was more than just clever tricks - it involved understanding the human mind. "That was like real-life magic to me," said Major, 30. "And I wanted to learn everything I could after that about our mind and the way that we're wired!" Major, who lives in Washington but is originally from Carroll County, is bringing his stage show "Think: An Evening of Mind-Reading and Magic" to the Theatre Project at 8 p.m. Friday and 6 p.m. and 9 p.m Saturday.
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FEATURES
August 24, 1997
I just ate the perfect cantaloupe from the Eastern Shore. It was so sweet and tasty! I kept the seeds and want to know how I should preserve them so I can plant them in my own garden.If your cantaloupe is a hybrid -- as many are -- it will not reseed. Your best bet is to learn the name of the variety and buy some fresh seeds next spring.If you discover that the variety you like is open-pollinated (nonhybrid), you can save the seeds and plant next year. First, wash them in a colander. Dry at room temperature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Nothing says summer like a fresh salad served al fresco. Pack your picnic basket with a bottle of wine, a fresh baguette and one of these summery salads, favorites of local chefs. From a simple concoction of crab and cantaloupe to an intriguing mix of apples, almonds and Spanish cheese, these salads put a creative spin on the season's best local ingredients. Crab, cantaloupe, red onion and mint salad with frozen cantaloupe martini Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Waterfront Kitchen in Fells Point designed this salad - and accompanying cocktail - to "take advantage of the best local summer ingredients from the Eastern Shore.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | August 14, 1991
THIS SIMPLE DESSERT, which uses angel food cake mix a its base, has a creamy melon flavor. It's the perfect way to use cantaloupes from the backyard or a farmer's market. The dessert can be prepared up to 24 hours before serving.9- This recipe is from Thomas J. Lipton Inc.Angel Food Torte with Cantaloupe Mousse1 18.25-ounce package angel food cake mix1 envelope unflavored gelatin1/4 cup cold water1 teaspoon fresh lime juice3 cups cantaloupe, about 1 medium, pureed1/4 cup sugar1 teaspoon fresh grated lime peel1/2 teaspoon rum extract, optional1 cup frozen whipped topping, thawedBake angel food cake mix in 10-inch tube pan according to package directions; cool on wire rack.
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,Chicago Tribune | August 24, 1994
First, let's answer this nagging question: What's the difference between a muskmelon and a cantaloupe?They're both ivory-yellow, solid and wrapped in fishnet rinds, but one's got seams, right?Wrong, or at least not exactly, says Chuck Voigt, a vegetable specialist at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. The melon without seams is what many people call a cantaloupe, but technically it's not a cantaloupe, he says. It's really a muskmelon without seams, called a western muskmelon, which is different from an eastern muskmelon with seams, which is what most people call a muskmelon.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
IT IS ONE of the first melons of the season. It smells good. And its sweet taste reminds me of barefoot breakfasts on dewy mornings. For these and a lot of other reasons, some logical, some emotional, I crave cantaloupe in the summer.For starters, sliced cantaloupe is pleasant to wake up to. No commotion. No herbs or spices, just the bare fruit. I prefer to greet the dawn quietly, sweetly, with a minimum of fuss. I have found that days that start with coffee, cantaloupe slices, bare feet and cut-off shorts seem to come to much better ends than days that begin with breakfast meetings, polished shoes and suits.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 30, 2007
When we returned after being away on vacation for several weeks, some good friends suggested that we all catch up by having a pizza supper together. The hosts offered to pick up several varieties of pies from a local pizzeria (one that specializes in inventive creations) and to make a couple of sorbets for dessert. I volunteered to be in charge of the salad. At first I was going to toss together my mainstay "insalata" of mixed greens coated with a red-wine dressing, but in the back of my mind was the memory of an unusual recipe for a salad of arugula and baby spinach dressed in sherry vinaigrette garnished with thinly sliced cantaloupe and prosciutto.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 25, 2001
IT IS JULY and the air is filled with the aroma of lopes. In the argot of Maryland produce stand clerks, lopes - sometimes spelled loupes - are cantaloupes. Their perfume is a regular roadside attraction of summertime produce shopping. While I revel in the bouquet of lopes, I struggle with the question of how to pick a ripe one. Do I simply give it the sniff test, looking for the familiar "buy me" scent? Should I shake it, listening for moving seeds? Or do I give it the intense eyeball, looking at the color of the skin under the melon's netting?
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | July 31, 1996
Cantaloupe season is in full swing and supermarkets have mountains of melons.At first glance cantaloupes may look alike. So how do you single out the sweet ones? The ones that are ready to eat? The ones with vivid orange flesh and lots of juice?Cantaloupe customers have several approaches. There are thumpers, shakers and sniffers. Pokers, too.The thumpers and shakers are having fun, but they may not end up with the best choice. According to the California Cantaloupe Advisory Board, the sniffers and pokers will have more success.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
For those of us who grew up in Baltimore, cantaloupe brings back memories of the a-rabs walking down the street with their horse-drawn carts bellowing in that wonderful sing-song cadence to come out for fruit. Going out with my mother to buy fruit (and to water and pet the horse) was always a treat, especially knowing that we'd come home with a cantaloupe. My mother liked it plain with a little salt "to bring out the sweetness," and it was my introduction to the beautiful interplay between sweet and savory.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
The family of a Maryland man who died of listeria is suing the Colorado melon farm that grew cantaloupes linked to a nationwide outbreak of the deadly bacteria. The family of Clarence D. Wells, who died in August, filed the lawsuit against Jensen Farms and Frontera Produce in U.S. District Court on Friday, according to court records. The family could not be reached for comment Friday. Wells ate cantaloupe on several occasions during the weeks before his death, court documents said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Local melon growers and retailers are trying to reassure consumers after listeria linked to cantaloupe from a Colorado farm killed 13 people across the country, including one in Maryland — the deadliest foodborne outbreak in more than a decade. While federal public health officials have warned of the potential for more deaths, state officials are reaching out to retailers to ensure they're aware of the recall, and the produce industry is working to contain the crisis. Meanwhile, some consumers are putting off cantaloupe purchases.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 30, 2007
When we returned after being away on vacation for several weeks, some good friends suggested that we all catch up by having a pizza supper together. The hosts offered to pick up several varieties of pies from a local pizzeria (one that specializes in inventive creations) and to make a couple of sorbets for dessert. I volunteered to be in charge of the salad. At first I was going to toss together my mainstay "insalata" of mixed greens coated with a red-wine dressing, but in the back of my mind was the memory of an unusual recipe for a salad of arugula and baby spinach dressed in sherry vinaigrette garnished with thinly sliced cantaloupe and prosciutto.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | July 29, 2007
Served straight from the fridge, this light and refreshing dish would make an excellent opener for barbecued pork. The soup is prepared with a simple sugar syrup infused with torn mint leaves. Cubed cantaloupe and honeydew melon are added to the aromatic syrup along with freshly squeezed lime juice, then chilled. Finally, the mixture is pureed with some of the cubed melon reserved for the garnish. Although the recipe serves four, it can easily be doubled if necessary. Best of all, this dish needs no last-minute attention.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | July 25, 2007
The car smelled like cantaloupe, and that meant it was high summer, the start of the local cantaloupe season. The two ripe cantaloupes were stashed in the back of my car, sharing space with some pretty aromatic company: a handful of peaches, a bag of coffee beans and a loaf of freshly baked bread. Yet when it came to fragrance, there was no contest. The "lopes" were far and away the smelliest. Scent is a powerful memory trigger, and the fragrance of lopes that I purchased last week reminded me of past summers and juicy delights.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 28, 1991
The other day I solved a major summertime problem: what to do with leftover lopes. Now when cantaloupe excess strikes, I make ice cream. Cantaloupe overload is often a problem for me. When I go to a farmer's market, I fall victim to the melons' sweet perfume.They smell so good. Instead of buying one lope, which would make a nice breakfast, or two lopes, which would keep me in melon balls for a week, I end up buying three. There is always a special price for a trio, three for $4. So it seems like a bargain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | November 16, 2006
All discussion of Koco's Pub and Grill, a friendly little eatery in Baltimore's Lauraville neighborhood, must begin with the crab cake ($23.95). This enormous mound of pure, snowy lumps has been compared to a softball on foodie Web sites. But I think they're even bigger than that. Maybe a grapefruit. Or a small cantaloupe. Poor:]
NEWS
By David P. Greisman and David P. Greisman,Special to The Sun | July 15, 2007
Doris Jenkins' fruit bowls are exactly that -- decorative shapes carved out of cantaloupes, honeydews and watermelons, functional containers that hold blueberries, strawberries, dip and pieces of the melon the bowl is made from. Other sculptors may chisel their creations for extended periods of time. Melon carvers, though, need little more than kitchen utensils, a taped-on pattern and less than 30 minutes to finish products that are temporary but tasty. "It's an artistic thing, but you don't have to be artistic to do it. It is such an easy thing to learn," said Jenkins, 74, of Woodbine, who has taught melon carving for about a decade.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 5, 2007
What we're moving to in this society is around-the-clock instantaneous communication that might drive us all crazy from the blather. Look what's happening now. You can be walking down the produce aisle of your supermarket and the man next to you will suddenly start talking in a loud voice while squeezing a cantaloupe. At first you think the man is insane - My God, he's talking to a melon! Or you think: No, wait, he's talking to me! Only now he appears to be talking and staring at the ceiling, as if communing with the fluorescent lighting.
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