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By Raeanne S. Sarazen and Raeanne S. Sarazen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 13, 2001
My question is regarding canola oil, which is noted as being healthful. I would like to know the name of the plant that is used to produce this product. The ingredients label of my bottle states only "canola oil."- Delores Biles, Downers Grove, Ill. Canola oil comes from a variety of rapeseed. But canola oil is not the same as rapeseed oil, which has lots of erucic acid, a fatty acid that has caused tumors and cardiac lesions in animal studies. According to a Federal Drug Administration spokeswoman, Canadians began a rapeseed-hybridization program in the 1960s to reduce the oil's erucic-acid content, in hopes of marketing it as an edible oil. By the late 1970s they had developed what is now known as canola, then called low erucic acid rapeseed oil. In 1985 the FDA recognized that rapeseed oil with erucic acid levels below 2 percent was generally recognized as safe.
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NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Local chefs share cool, creative uses for the kitchen staple. By Kit Waskom Pollard Eggs can do it all. Equally at home as breakfast on the go or as the centerpiece of an elegant dinner, it's no wonder that the simple ingredient holds a special place in chefs' hearts. Here, four local chefs share their favorite egg preparations, ranging from a simple crab omelet to delicate, sophisticated croquettes. Egg Yolk Croquettes with Bacon, Comté & Truffle Yields 6 servings In the Lord Baltimore Hotel's restaurant, The French Kitchen, Chef Jordan Miller experiments with high-tech toys, turning out dishes that combine ambition with great flavor - such as these carefully constructed croquettes in heady cheese-truffle-bacon sauce.
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NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | February 24, 2006
A Field Guide to Buying Organic By Luddene Perry and Dan Schultz Bantam Dell/$14.00 Most of us know we should buy and eat the freshest food we can find. But cost and convenience often make that difficult. A Field Guide to Buying Organic, published in 2005, cuts out much of that work. It provides an overview of most of the debate surrounding organic food, including issues ranging from pesticide-free farming to bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease. The academic discussion is too weighty for a quick read, but the aisle-by-aisle chapters are easy to skim and are useful.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | October 4, 2012
As fall approaches, the cuisines in area restaurants begin to change to suit the warm colors, temperatures and flavors of the season. Perhaps it's the cooling breezes or the leaves falling, but there is something about the weather that entices diners to seek out comfort food. Chef/owner Jon Kohler of Pairings Bistro in Bel Air has created a classic favorite, Beef Bourguignon. “Nothing is more comfort food when the weather starts to turn cooler than Beef Bourguignon. It's rich and tasty and pairs well with a wide variety of red wines from Bordeaux to Rhone to Rioja Spain to California Pinot Noir,” says Kohler, 40. Pairings Bistro is Kohler's first restaurant, which he opened in March 2009.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY. | April 26, 2006
When a bag of kale showed up on the doorstep, courtesy of our neighbors departing on an unexpected trip, it raised the age-old question: What to do? What to do? Somehow Asian flavors came to mind, a departure in our house where almost everything has a Mediterranean influence. With ginger root and a few other flavorings, this dish quickly came together. Pork chops were in the fridge, so they became the protein - but chicken would be a delicious substitute. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe and analysis.
NEWS
October 13, 2006
Storm on Jupiter may be more intense A little more than a year ago, the small spot on Jupiter was a pale white; now it matches the reddish hue of its bigger sibling, the Great Red Spot, and boasts 400 mph winds, according to new data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Both spots are actually fierce storms in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the red spot - at three times the size of Earth - is much more noticeable, strange things are happening to the Little Red Spot, officially called "Oval BA."
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | September 12, 1990
Catfish ought to get the prize for the best image makeover in the fish business. Once thought of as an undesirable scavenger fish, the tasty whitefish now has Americans clamoring for it everywhere from homes to restaurants.The makeover answer was catfish farming, a clean method of raising the fish in a controlled environment that the Catfish Institute says has bolstered catfish consumption 25 percent a year for the past 10 years.I have taken one of the typical Southern preparations for fried catfish and updated it for 1990s tastebuds and health concerns.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 8, 2012
Just because you're trying to eat healthy doesn't mean totally abandoning your sweet tooth. Healthy eating guru Joy Bauer i ncludes many healthy deserts in her healthy recipe library. This week we feature her soft-baked, chocolate-cherry oatmeal cookies as our healthy recipe. If you have a recipe you would like to share email me at andrea.walker@baltsun.com and I will include it on this blog. Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups oats, rolled, quick cooking, or old-fashioned rolled oats 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt 1/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips 1/2 cup dried cherries, or dried cranberries 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 tablespoon canola oil 2 egg whites lightly beaten 1 tablespoon vanilla extract Preparation: Preheat oven to 350 degrees and coat one or two baking sheets with oil spray In a medium bowl, whisk together the rolled oats, flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt until the ingredients are evenly distributed.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1994
For fans of movie-theater popcorn -- "the Godzilla of snack foods," according to a report released earlier this week -- there may be a kernel of hope. At least in Baltimore.Here, theater-goers have a good chance of sitting down with a tub of corn popped in vegetable oil, which in health terms, is better for you than that popped with the saturated-fat coconut oil cited in a study released Monday by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.The watchdog group reports that a 16-cup serving of unbuttered, coconut-oil-popped corn has 901 calories and 43 grams of cholesterol.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1995
This simple, 15-minute chili actually has a green tint given by the green salsa which is available in many supermarkets these days. Verde, (pronounced vare-day), means green in Spanish and it is also the name given to Mexican-style stews that are based on the green tomatillo and green chilies rather than the red tomato and red chilies. A verde often uses pork as the meat. If desired, take the theme a little further and, instead of using red meat, use a mild poultry such as ground turkey or ground chicken.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 8, 2012
Just because you're trying to eat healthy doesn't mean totally abandoning your sweet tooth. Healthy eating guru Joy Bauer i ncludes many healthy deserts in her healthy recipe library. This week we feature her soft-baked, chocolate-cherry oatmeal cookies as our healthy recipe. If you have a recipe you would like to share email me at andrea.walker@baltsun.com and I will include it on this blog. Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups oats, rolled, quick cooking, or old-fashioned rolled oats 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt 1/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips 1/2 cup dried cherries, or dried cranberries 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 tablespoon canola oil 2 egg whites lightly beaten 1 tablespoon vanilla extract Preparation: Preheat oven to 350 degrees and coat one or two baking sheets with oil spray In a medium bowl, whisk together the rolled oats, flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt until the ingredients are evenly distributed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
The key to the perfect tailgating offering is impressing your fellow sports fans with foods that are flavorful and hearty. When you're a gourmet chef like Cinghiale's Julian Marucci, using fresh ingredients helps give classics a fresh spin. "You want to impress people by showing them different types of food that people wouldn't usually make," said Marucci, the 28-year-old executive chef for the Harbor East Italian restaurant. "It comes down to seasoning, execution and technique.
NEWS
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | January 23, 2008
I need to downsize. I'm not talking about just my car and my home but also my pantry. Don't misunderstand me; I still enjoy experimenting with new recipes and ingredients, but I have condiments, pastas and canned and packaged goods that hit their expiration dates before I use them. People give me stuff and I get samples that I give away because there is only so much I can cook. So now that it's the new year, I'm thinking about those ingredients that I must have. Here's a list of some of them: Dried red-pepper flakes: I carry individual packets of these with me at all times in case I need an emergency endorphin rush when traveling.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Reporter | September 12, 2007
When we first met Lottie Barnett, a lively 84-year-old, she was dredging pieces of liver in flour and frying them in canola oil for her supper. I was with Robin Spence, the registered dietitian from Union Memorial Hospital who helps with our monthly Make Over My Meal series. About five months ago, Barnett moved into one of the low-income senior apartments in the Stadium Place development on 33rd Street.
NEWS
October 13, 2006
Storm on Jupiter may be more intense A little more than a year ago, the small spot on Jupiter was a pale white; now it matches the reddish hue of its bigger sibling, the Great Red Spot, and boasts 400 mph winds, according to new data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Both spots are actually fierce storms in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the red spot - at three times the size of Earth - is much more noticeable, strange things are happening to the Little Red Spot, officially called "Oval BA."
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | September 13, 2006
How many different kinds of oil do I need in my kitchen? You can get by with as few as two - a good extra-virgin olive oil and an inexpensive unflavored oil such as canola or corn. Oil essentially serves three roles in the kitchen. As a texture provider, it creates moistness in baked goods and lends sauces and soups a silky quality. When you saute or fry in oil, you are using it as a cooking medium. Aromatic oils - olive oil and unrefined nut oils among them - enhance flavor when drizzled raw over a finished dish or used in a salad dressing or mayonnaise.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 23, 1994
Q: What is the difference between the different types of olive oils? How do I know which ones to buy? What about canola oil?A: All olive oils are monounsaturated and are graded according to the degree of acidity they contain. You'll find many different colors, qualities, places of origin and prices. The best olive oils are cold-pressed, which produces a low level of acidity. Extra virgin olive oil is the result of the first of the cold-pressings. It is considered the finest, the fruitiest and is also the most expensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
The key to the perfect tailgating offering is impressing your fellow sports fans with foods that are flavorful and hearty. When you're a gourmet chef like Cinghiale's Julian Marucci, using fresh ingredients helps give classics a fresh spin. "You want to impress people by showing them different types of food that people wouldn't usually make," said Marucci, the 28-year-old executive chef for the Harbor East Italian restaurant. "It comes down to seasoning, execution and technique.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
Whether you're composing a spring salad, searing salmon or mixing up a pesto, oil is an essential component of cooking. These days, there are more choices than ever, from designer olive oils to grapeseed, from nut oils to those infused with the trendy flavors of black and white truffles. Health is another consideration: The right oil can deliver lots of the so-called "good" monounsaturated fats; others are higher in artery-clogging saturated fat. All of this gives rise to plenty of questions: Is extra-virgin olive oil always the best variety to use?
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