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NEWS
September 4, 2003
On September 1, 2003, WILLIAMPATRICK, beloved husband of Anne E. Canning (nee Rider), father of Maureen Hill and Christine Marie Hahas, step-father of Margaret, Edward and Paul Mullen and Mary Bush, brother of Margaret Mary Geckle, Pauline Eckenrode, Rita Brulinski, John Canning, Patricia Tracey and Angela Canning. Also survived by 14 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Mass of Christian Burial at Sacred Heart Church, Glyndon, Thursday 10 A.M. Interment in Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
George N. Manis, founder of the Annapolis law firm of Manis, Canning & Associates, died Wednesday of heart failure at the Fairfield Nursing Center in Crownsville. He was 85. The son of Nick Manis and Harriet Manis, Greek immigrants, George Nick Manis was born and raised in Annapolis. His father owned The Presto restaurant in Annapolis. Mr. Manis attended Manlius Prep School in DeWitt, N.Y., and Annapolis High School, where he was a star basketball player and was named to the All State national tournament team.
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NEWS
January 8, 2006
On Friday, January 6, 2006, MRS. DOROTHY ANN (nee Ford) CANNING, wife of the late Thomas L. Canning, mother of Nancy La Fon and Thomas Canning, mother-in-law of Laurie Canning, grandmother of Zachary, Cory, Adam, Mark and Philip, great grandmother of Nathan, sister of Gerald Ford. Friends may call at the LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Avenue, on Monday, January 9, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral services will be held 11 A.M., Tuesday, January 10 at the funeral home. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 12, 2014
The New Jersey high school senior who moved in with a friend after disputes with her parents and then sued them for financial support returned home Wednesday. I described this family drama in my Monday column. Rachel Canning, who left home in October, had asked a judge to require her parents to pay her Catholic high school tuition, her lawyer's fees, her college tuition and more than $650 a week in support. A judge had refused her request for immediate financial relief but had scheduled a full hearing on the matter for April.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 1, 2010
James McSherry Shriver Jr., a member of an old Carroll County family and a former canning company executive who lectured widely on agricultural history, died Monday after being injured in an automobile accident. He was 82. Mr. Shriver was driving south on Greenspring Avenue near Lindemann Lane in a 2000 Oldsmobile Alero when he swerved, hitting a mailbox and then striking another vehicle. He was taken to Sinai Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The accident remains under investigation, a Baltimore County police spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 31, 2009
Mary Clyde Streett, who helped operate a once-thriving Harford County tomato cannery, died of dementia Dec. 26 at the Bel Air Convalescent Center. She was 98. Born Mary Clyde Spencer in Forest Hill, she worked alongside her father in his canning operation in Frogtown, between Bel Air and Forest Hill. Their Spenceola Farm was once a well-known tomato-canning hub. Before graduating from Bel Air High School in 1929, she rode to classes in a horse-drawn buggy. "Her yearbook called her the 'bright light' of the class," said her son, Dr. Richard P. Streett Jr. of Churchville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 2, 2006
On his one day off from his 20-date tour in the United States, Canadian indie rocker Brendan Canning chills in his hotel room in Pensacola, Fla., relishing TV shows he hadn't seen since childhood. Now, the Broken Social Scene co-founder is watching The Jeffersons on Nick at Night. "I grew up with this," he says over the phone. "I don't get to see shows like this anymore." These days, Canning doesn't get to do much outside of making music with his sprawling band, which includes 15 members plus two or three other musician friends, depending on availability.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 20, 2006
I never gave much of a thought as to why we had stewed tomatoes on the dinner table a couple of nights a week. It was just a part of Baltimore. And not only at my family's house on Guilford Avenue. They were regularly served at the Maryland Club. And only a few weeks ago, I enjoyed some of the best at a luncheon preceding the Grand National steeplechase race. Stewed tomatoes? Basic food, terribly out of style today, but so evocative of the cuisine that has been vanishing from Maryland since the chefs all got their culinary arts degrees.
FEATURES
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 1999
Why can? Y2K, for one. Perhaps you believe the predictions that the new year will bring widespread chaos, with the Y2K computer glitch causing electrical failures and kitchen appliances and ATMs to shut down. You want to be sure you have your own food supply.Perhaps you plan to take your cue from computers, which, at the turn of the calendar to 1-1-00, may not know whether it's 2000 or 1900. You decide you would rather revisit the past than face the uncertainties of the future."Close your eyes and let yourself be transported to a Victorian house, its garden sprawling with vines and bushes from which the bounty will be reaped," write Barry Bluestein and Kevin Morrissey in "Home Made in the Kitchen" (Viking Penguin, 1995)
NEWS
By Mary Gold | August 11, 1991
Now is the prime time for Howard County gardeners to enjoy the fruits and vegetables of their labors. Harvesting, even from a garden of three or four tomato plants, is rewarding.But most of us can't eatfast enough to keep up with the onslaught, and we rue the spring daywhen we tucked in those extra tomato plants or row of beans.But, it's more than the satisfaction that comes with success, or the extra good food that winds up on our tables and in our freezers and pantries. It's a feeling of participating in a recurring rite of human existence, a sense of community with all who preceded us.Harvesting and preserving our food gives us some feeling of control overour own lives in an era when such occasions are rare.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
When I read Susan Reimer 's column about Rachel Canning, the willful N.J. teen who's suing her parents for support and tuition, I'm delighted I never had children ( "Education is not optional," March 7). No doubt other childless adults feel the same. Whatever the finale to this ridiculous story may be, let me also point out the obvious: All those involved are very attractive, upper-middle class Americans, and also from New Jersey. Do you get my drift? I see is a TV reality show in the making.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Spike Gjerde is coming to Belvedere Square. The Woodberry Kitchen owner has signed a lease for the multi-level restaurant space that has been vacant since Crush closed in November. His Belvedere Square project, Gjerde said, will be part canning kitchen and part diner. Gjerde said he will bring Woodberry Kitchen 's canning and preserving operations up to the Belvedere Square space, which was a Hess shoe store before its conversion into a restaurant space. "I love Belvedere Square," Gjerde said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 1, 2010
James McSherry Shriver Jr., a member of an old Carroll County family and a former canning company executive who lectured widely on agricultural history, died Monday after being injured in an automobile accident. He was 82. Mr. Shriver was driving south on Greenspring Avenue near Lindemann Lane in a 2000 Oldsmobile Alero when he swerved, hitting a mailbox and then striking another vehicle. He was taken to Sinai Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The accident remains under investigation, a Baltimore County police spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2010
Marie K. Razulis, a retired chemist, died of heart disease April 10 at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. She was 89 and lived in the Fairhaven Retirement Community. Born Marie Kuulei Goo-On in Washington, D.C., she was the daughter of parents who lived in Hawaii. Her ancestry was Chinese, Hawaiian and Portuguese. Her father took a job in Washington as a government translator and she spent her childhood in Falls Church, Va. As a child, she demonstrated artistic talent and played the piano.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 31, 2009
Mary Clyde Streett, who helped operate a once-thriving Harford County tomato cannery, died of dementia Dec. 26 at the Bel Air Convalescent Center. She was 98. Born Mary Clyde Spencer in Forest Hill, she worked alongside her father in his canning operation in Frogtown, between Bel Air and Forest Hill. Their Spenceola Farm was once a well-known tomato-canning hub. Before graduating from Bel Air High School in 1929, she rode to classes in a horse-drawn buggy. "Her yearbook called her the 'bright light' of the class," said her son, Dr. Richard P. Streett Jr. of Churchville.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 31, 2009
Mary Clyde Streett, who helped operate a once-thriving Harford County tomato cannery, died of dementia Dec. 26 at the Bel Air Convalescent Center. She was 98. Born Mary Clyde Spencer in Forest Hill, she worked alongside her father in his canning operation in Frogtown, between Bel Air and Forest Hill. Their Spenceola Farm was once a well-known tomato-canning hub. Before graduating from Bel Air High School in 1929, she rode to classes in a horse-drawn buggy.
FEATURES
By Michelle Medley and Michelle Medley,Universal Press Syndicate | July 29, 1998
Pickling is so hot it's cool.Once a necessity to feed a family through the winter, pickling -- using vinegar or lemon juice to "cook" or preserve food and inhibit bacterial growth -- has become a nostalgic hobby for people who see it as a reminder of simpler times and an outlet for culinary creativity. Even chefs have embraced pickling to add pungent flavors to their trademark dishes."People are literally begging for a good homemade pickle, a bread and butter pickle, a sweet pickle, a sour pickle.
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