Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCannes Film Festival
IN THE NEWS

Cannes Film Festival

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 21, 1993
Cannes, France -- "Look at that harbor," says an old-timer. "Five years ago it had 50 mega-yachts. Now . . . two yachts and a garbage barge."He's right. And the near-empty harbor just off the Palais du Festivals at the world's richest and most chaotic film festival is an apt metaphor for the ennui and sense of loss that seems to grip the two-week event in the south of France.Oh, the tourists still throng the grand old Boulevard de Croisette, where the movie wars are waged and in whose bars and cafes and discos, it is rumored, the deals are made and the stars may be seen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 12, 2013
Baz Luhrmann's adaptation of "The Great Gatsby" will kick off the 66th Festival de Cannes, organizers announced today . "It is a great honor for all those who have worked on 'The Great Gatsby' to open the Cannes Film Festival," Luhrmann said in a statement. "We are thrilled to return to a country, place and festival that has always been so close to our hearts, not only because my first film 'Strictly Ballroom' was screened there 21 years ago, but also because F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote some of the most poignant and beautiful passages of his extraordinary novel just a short distance away at a villa outside Saint-Raphaël.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | April 24, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- This year's Cannes Film Festival will be bracketed by two major U.S. productions: Paul Verhoeven's "Basic Instinct" on opening night and Ron Howard's "Far and Away" as the final attraction.They head an unusually long list of U.S. films being shown during the prestigious May 7-18 event. Joining "Basic Instinct" in the festival competition are Robert Altman's "The Player," Hal Hartley's "Simple Men," Sidney Lumet's "Close to Eden," David Lynch's "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me" and Gary Sinise's "Of Mice and Men."
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 25, 2011
Whether he is handing out hard hits on the football field or delivering one-liners during interviews, Terrell Suggs is used to making plenty of noise at his day job (just ask NFL quarterbacks like Tom Brady). But the outspoken Ravens linebacker, a Pro Bowler in 2010, is quietly making a name for himself in the film industry. His production company, Team Sizzle Worldwide, just wrapped principal photography for his latest film project, “The Coalition,” and the trailer was released to the Internet last week . Suggs co-wrote the film -- which stars "227" actress Jackee Harry and Denyce Lawton from Tyler Perry's "House of Payne” -- along with director Monica Mingo.
FEATURES
By Claire Rosemberg and Claire Rosemberg,AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE | May 12, 2004
CANNES, France - Cannes Film Festival organizers yesterday struck an 11th-hour deal with angry French entertainment workers to stop them from wrecking the 12-day event, the world's premier film showcase. On the eve of the glitzy launch of the annual movie bonanza, which runs through May 23, Cannes announced it had agreed after hours of talks to let the workers make several public speeches in exchange for peace on the streets. Festival organizers and the city had feared that scenes of chaos and protest would jeopardize both the future of the event and the economy of Cannes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 27, 1993
Imagine a film festival held in a train station during a war or at rush hour. Imagine a maze of a place, with ramps, escalators (some of which actually work), elevators, hallways, corridors, shops, dirty bathrooms. Give it two main auditoriums and about 30 other smaller auditoriums, some of which are called by name and others by letter and still others by number. Don't ex- plain any of this. When asked to, profess amusement. Then fill it with endless swarming, teeming crowds.Now imagine that hardly anybody in these crowds speaks the same language.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 22, 1993
The lesson at the Cannes Film Festival was clear and simple: There's no star like an old star.In an event parched of celebrity, Elizabeth Taylor, who hasn't made a decent movie in years, blew in Thursday and ignited the town like a torch. She even outdrew little Sylvester Stallone at the premiere of his film "Cliffhanger" in the Palais du Festivals, where thousands of fans gathered for a glimpse. It was like the premiere of "Gone With the Wind" in Atlanta in 1939, one of those majestic, formal movie moments that combine crowd frenzy, tan beautiful people in tuxedos and strapless gowns, artificial snow and movie hype to create that sense of glamour the festival had so sorely lacked, particularly after two drippy, rainy days and a series of enigmatic and remote movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 2005
Desperate Housewives: The Complete First Season [Buena Vista] $60 The set of discs for last year's water cooler series has loads of extras that include extended versions of six episodes, commentary with creator Marc Cherry and director Larry Shaw; the housewives discussing their favorite scenes; several featurettes, deleted scenes and bloopers. A clever short features Oprah Win- frey as the new neighbor on Wisteria Lane. Naked [Criterion] $40 Both director Mike Leigh and star David Thewlis took home top honors at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival for this uncompromising drama about a wanderer named Johnny.
NEWS
March 31, 2008
The College of Notre Dame's 2008 Baldwin Lecture in the Humanities is set to be delivered at 7 p.m. tomorrow by Marjane Satrapi, the best-selling author of Persepolis. The book tells the story of her youth in Iran in the 1970s and '80s, including the Islamic Revolution and war with Iraq. The book was published as four volumes in France and two volumes in the United States. A film based on the book - also titled Persepolis - received the Jury Prize Award at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for an Academy Award in the animated feature film category.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | May 15, 1992
"Basic Instinct" -- which opened the Cannes Film Festival last week -- is one of the first official hits of 1992. It was No. 1 in the box-office battle last weekend and has grossed about $90 million in the eight weeks since its domestic release.Even this early in the year, it is safe to say that the sexually charged thriller will be among the top 10 moneymakers of 1992 -- possibly among the top five. And the film's now-famous interrogation scene -- in which sexy Sharon Stone crosses her legs to reveal her panties-free crotch to a group of male cops -- should assure the movie hit status in the video market.
SPORTS
Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
"When Beautiful People Do Ugly Things," a short film produced and co-written by Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs, will be shown during next month's Cannes Film Festival. The film, parts of which were shot at Pazo in Harbor East last month, follows 24 hours in the life of the two main characters, Bishop (Quincy Smith) and T.J. (Kari Nicolle). After dating for five years, and in spite of considerable skepticism from their friends, the two are finally getting married. "When Beautiful People Do Ugly Things" chronicles the 12 hours both before and after their wedding ceremony.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 3, 2009
'Street Gang' tells story of 'Sesame Street' PBS' Sesame Street, which reaches 8 million viewers in 120 countries, will celebrate its 40th anniversary this year with many products. The recently published Street Gang: The Complete History of Sesame Street by Michael Davis chronicles the evolution of the show created by Jim Henson, the man behind the Muppets, including Big Bird, Bert and Ernie, and Elmo. Davis is a former Baltimore Sun editor and TV Guide columnist. The fall will see a second book, Sesame Street: A Celebration of Forty Years of Life on the Street, by Louise Gikow, and a DVD, Sesame Street: 40th Anniversary.
NEWS
March 31, 2008
The College of Notre Dame's 2008 Baldwin Lecture in the Humanities is set to be delivered at 7 p.m. tomorrow by Marjane Satrapi, the best-selling author of Persepolis. The book tells the story of her youth in Iran in the 1970s and '80s, including the Islamic Revolution and war with Iraq. The book was published as four volumes in France and two volumes in the United States. A film based on the book - also titled Persepolis - received the Jury Prize Award at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for an Academy Award in the animated feature film category.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 21, 2007
A BON commencement bonne fin!" A good beginning makes a good end, say the French. (They are saying a lot these days with their controversial new president, but we could apply this to the Cannes Film Festival as well.) Would you walk a mile down the Croisette to see a movie by the controversial Coen Brothers, or Hollywood's pet Quentin Tarantino, or the fabled Gus Van Sant, or the relatively unpublicized Hong Kong maestro Wong Kar-Wai? If so, maybe you belong in Cannes at the most famous of all movie festivals - this one being the French Riviera's glamorous 60th celebration.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
TOUR DE FRANCE ON FILM -- Filmmaker and cyclist Scott Coady's The Tour Baby!, a firsthand, behind-the-scenes look at the world's most famous bicycle race, will be shown at 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Creative Alliance, 3134 Eastern Ave., in the old Patterson Theatre. Tickets are $8, $6 for C.A. members, $5 if you arrive on a bike. Proceeds benefit The Lance Armstrong Foundation. Information: 410-276-1651 or creativealli ance.org. JEKYLL & HYDE --Victor Fleming's 1941 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, starring Spencer Tracy as a London physician who unwittingly invents a potion that unleashes his own dark side, will be next week's offering in the continuing Wednesday night film series at the St. Thomas Aquinas Church parish center, 37th Street and Roland Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 2005
Desperate Housewives: The Complete First Season [Buena Vista] $60 The set of discs for last year's water cooler series has loads of extras that include extended versions of six episodes, commentary with creator Marc Cherry and director Larry Shaw; the housewives discussing their favorite scenes; several featurettes, deleted scenes and bloopers. A clever short features Oprah Win- frey as the new neighbor on Wisteria Lane. Naked [Criterion] $40 Both director Mike Leigh and star David Thewlis took home top honors at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival for this uncompromising drama about a wanderer named Johnny.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 3, 2009
'Street Gang' tells story of 'Sesame Street' PBS' Sesame Street, which reaches 8 million viewers in 120 countries, will celebrate its 40th anniversary this year with many products. The recently published Street Gang: The Complete History of Sesame Street by Michael Davis chronicles the evolution of the show created by Jim Henson, the man behind the Muppets, including Big Bird, Bert and Ernie, and Elmo. Davis is a former Baltimore Sun editor and TV Guide columnist. The fall will see a second book, Sesame Street: A Celebration of Forty Years of Life on the Street, by Louise Gikow, and a DVD, Sesame Street: 40th Anniversary.
FEATURES
By Jack Mathews and Jack Mathews,Newsday | May 12, 1994
Movie fans hoping to see major American stars at the 47th Cannes Film Festival getting under way tonight will pretty much have to settle for the daily glimpses of jury president Clint Eastwood walking into screenings.The competition films that Mr. Eastwood and his fellow jurors, Catherine Deneuve among them, will judge are conspicuously absent of prominent American movies. There is only one major studio picture on the schedule, Warner Bros.' "The Hudsucker Proxy," and its selection seems more an honorarium for the Coen brothers, who won the Golden Palm with their last film, "Barton Fink."
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | May 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - Remember when movies aimed to entertain? You could take the whole family and escape the quotidian for the silver screen, watching bigger-than-life heroes engage in daring and admirable deeds. Or you could share a few laughs without worrying about offensive double-entendres or scatological references. No more. Now, if Hollywood isn't drenching its audience in blood or titillating it with naked bodies, it is propagandizing us with left-wing paranoia or pushing a radical social agenda.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Turan and Kenneth Turan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 24, 2004
CANNES, France - It's hard to render Michael Moore speechless, but the jury at the Cannes Film Festival did just that Saturday when it awarded the director the coveted Palme d'Or for his incendiary new political documentary, Fahrenheit 9/11. "What have you done?" were the first words out of a clearly flabbergasted Moore's mouth. "I am completely overwhelmed by this." Then, looking directly at president Quentin Tarantino and the rest of the Cannes jury, which has more Americans on it than any other nationality, he added suspiciously, "You just did this to mess with me."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.