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By Vincent J. Schodolski and Vincent J. Schodolski,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 1998
MONTEREY, Calif. -- When John Steinbeck looked out across the Monterey Bay waterfront six decades ago, this is what his poet-eye saw:"Cannery Row in Monterey in California is a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light, a tone, a habit, a nostalgia, a dream."That vision, which provided the opening lines for the novel he named after that bustling street of sardine canneries, flophouses, Chinese grocers, prostitutes and Depression-era down-and-outs, was of a place and a time in America long, long past.
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NEWS
June 6, 2002
The Grapes of Wrath - the very name is enough to summon the taste of dust and despair. John Steinbeck, whose centennial is being observed this year, won the Pulitzer Prize for the novel, which perhaps is his most famous work. Celebrated as a novelist and a writer of short stories, he was also a journalist - one who kept watch with the novelist's eye, finding enduring truths in the day-to-day events around him. During World War II, he reported from Italy and North Africa for the New York Herald Tribune.
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FEATURES
By Tracie Cone and Tracie Cone,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1994
Bruce Ariss unlocks a dank wooden box of a building, releasing the musty scent of fish and stale beer as California sunlight washes in off Monterey Bay.The rays illuminate the scuffed plank floors, splintery walls and beamed ceilings that form "Doc" Ricketts' lab, a rustic hideaway essentially unchanged since being immortalized in "Cannery Row."For Mr. Ariss, 83, crossing the threshold is a journey back to the sardine-canning days when friend John Steinbeck visited Doc's lab to absorb for his novels the lives of locals, whom he then called "whores, pimps, gamblers and sons of bitches."
NEWS
By Vincent J. Schodolski and Vincent J. Schodolski,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 1998
MONTEREY, Calif. -- When John Steinbeck looked out across the Monterey Bay waterfront six decades ago, this is what his poet-eye saw:"Cannery Row in Monterey in California is a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light, a tone, a habit, a nostalgia, a dream."That vision, which provided the opening lines for the novel he named after that bustling street of sardine canneries, flophouses, Chinese grocers, prostitutes and Depression-era down-and-outs, was of a place and a time in America long, long past.
NEWS
June 6, 2002
The Grapes of Wrath - the very name is enough to summon the taste of dust and despair. John Steinbeck, whose centennial is being observed this year, won the Pulitzer Prize for the novel, which perhaps is his most famous work. Celebrated as a novelist and a writer of short stories, he was also a journalist - one who kept watch with the novelist's eye, finding enduring truths in the day-to-day events around him. During World War II, he reported from Italy and North Africa for the New York Herald Tribune.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
Baltimore's Canton neighborhood, a blue-collar community reshaped as the city's Gold Coast in the 1980s, is about to experience another wave of development.Over the next several months, decisions are likely to be made that will affect the look and character of up to 17 acres of valuable land on both sides of Boston Street.Redevelopment plans aroused controversy in Canton throughout much of the 1980s as out-of-town developers proposed mega-projects that threatened to wall off the working-class neighborhood from its waterfront.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez | February 16, 1992
My grandmother was a bean snipper.The New World daughter of Old World Poles, Anna Potter Jones started making her own way in life as a child. At 9, she lost her mother to cancer and her father promised never to marry again. With her 11-year-old sister, Anna helped raise three younger siblings and began a lifetime of work.I knew that my grandmother had been a flapper during the Roaring '20s, had sewn sandbags for the Allies during World War II, and that she had once taken my mother to see Lou Costello in person at the old Hippodrome Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. is now open at Harborplace. The restaurant and market takes over the old Phillips anchor space. The restaurant will be open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. The restaurant is owned by Houston-based Landry's Inc, which refers to itself as "America's biggest dining, hospitality and entertainment company. " Their holdings include casinos, resorts, hotels and such formerly independently owned restaurants groups as McCormick & Schmick's and Morton's the Steakhouse.
NEWS
By Deborah Schoch and Mary Engel and Deborah Schoch and Mary Engel,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 2006
SAN JUAN BAUTISTA, Calif. --Much food lore has sprung from the Salinas and nearby valleys, fertile farm country that stretches from oak-studded hills to the bottom land and packing plants of Salinas and King City. The National Steinbeck Center on Salinas' Main Street pays homage to the farming themes of The Grapes of Wrath and Cannery Row. Organic farming has deep roots here, and so does the phenomenon of bagging fresh greens. Together, the two trends resulted in Natural Selection Foods, the industry giant that has grown rapidly amid farm fields and sunflowers in San Juan Bautista.
TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,Tribune Newspapers | October 25, 2009
MONTEREY, Calif. - -Dawn is coming soon. The lights are off, the sound system silent and the beasts of the Monterey Bay Aquarium have the place mostly to themselves: the otters, the anemones, the octopuses, the great white shark in the big tank, the lame young albatross in its rooftop cage - and Kacey Kurimura, who's at the kitchen sink in her apron and waterproof boots, reaching for a knife. Maybe the sea never sleeps, but this is how the day begins at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Before this one is over, 2,881 visitors will troop through, that young shark will fill up on fish, the albatross will dance with a new friend.
FEATURES
By Tracie Cone and Tracie Cone,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1994
Bruce Ariss unlocks a dank wooden box of a building, releasing the musty scent of fish and stale beer as California sunlight washes in off Monterey Bay.The rays illuminate the scuffed plank floors, splintery walls and beamed ceilings that form "Doc" Ricketts' lab, a rustic hideaway essentially unchanged since being immortalized in "Cannery Row."For Mr. Ariss, 83, crossing the threshold is a journey back to the sardine-canning days when friend John Steinbeck visited Doc's lab to absorb for his novels the lives of locals, whom he then called "whores, pimps, gamblers and sons of bitches."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
Baltimore's Canton neighborhood, a blue-collar community reshaped as the city's Gold Coast in the 1980s, is about to experience another wave of development.Over the next several months, decisions are likely to be made that will affect the look and character of up to 17 acres of valuable land on both sides of Boston Street.Redevelopment plans aroused controversy in Canton throughout much of the 1980s as out-of-town developers proposed mega-projects that threatened to wall off the working-class neighborhood from its waterfront.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez | February 16, 1992
My grandmother was a bean snipper.The New World daughter of Old World Poles, Anna Potter Jones started making her own way in life as a child. At 9, she lost her mother to cancer and her father promised never to marry again. With her 11-year-old sister, Anna helped raise three younger siblings and began a lifetime of work.I knew that my grandmother had been a flapper during the Roaring '20s, had sewn sandbags for the Allies during World War II, and that she had once taken my mother to see Lou Costello in person at the old Hippodrome Theater.
FEATURES
By Judith Wynn and Judith Wynn,Special to The Sun | October 6, 1994
In the short stories of "Grand Avenue," Miwok Indian chief and NTC UCLA English professor Greg Sarris explores the Native American folk culture of marginally employed Indians in northern California -- a region that first won literary fame in John Steinbeck's novels "Tortilla Flat" and "Cannery Row."Mr. Sarris' opening story, "The Magic Pony," recalls Steinbeck's 1938 novella "The Red Pony" -- both in its poignant evocation of a child's doomed love for a horse and its portrayal of the conflict between elderly people and their grown-up children.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | November 4, 2001
Lower Manhattan, long considered among the world's most energetic areas, has been added to the World Monuments Watch List of the 100 Most Endangered Sites as No. 101 after the Sept. 11 attacks. "Beyond the extraordinary toll on human life, the assault left historic buildings in the vicinity of the World Trade Center vulnerable," representatives of the World Monuments Fund said in a statement. "Technical assistance is urgently needed to assess the architectural integrity of surviving structures."
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