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November 1, 1990
The Cannery at the Baltimore Museum of Industry opens to the public on weekends beginning Sunday. The program, which takes about 90 minutes to complete, begins at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturdays and at 2:30 p.m. Sundays. The program includes a 15-minute videotape, role-playing and a computer exercise that compares work in the 1880s with work in the 1990s.The cannery program costs $1.75 in addition to the regular museum admission of $2 for adults, $1 for children and senior citizens and $6 for families.
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NEWS
January 9, 2006
Roland N. Shaffer, a former cannery operator and maintenance supervisor, died of apparent congestive heart failure Tuesday at Longview Nursing Home in Manchester, a town he had lived in much of his life. He was 92. Mr. Shaffer was born in Melrose and graduated from Manchester High School. He attended what was then Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College. For two decades he was a part owner and operator of vegetable canneries near Manchester, in Garrett County and in Maryland Line.
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NEWS
January 9, 2006
Roland N. Shaffer, a former cannery operator and maintenance supervisor, died of apparent congestive heart failure Tuesday at Longview Nursing Home in Manchester, a town he had lived in much of his life. He was 92. Mr. Shaffer was born in Melrose and graduated from Manchester High School. He attended what was then Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College. For two decades he was a part owner and operator of vegetable canneries near Manchester, in Garrett County and in Maryland Line.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 10, 2005
A triangular parcel near Baltimore's Canton waterfront will be the setting for one of the first high-profile building projects to get under way locally this year - an addition to the Can Company shopping and office center. Ziger/Snead Architects of Baltimore has designed a 9,500-square-foot retail center that will rise in the 2400 block of Boston St. It will occupy the last vacant development site on the old American Can Co. property, a former cannery that Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse has converted to 200,000 square feet of office and retail space.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
QUEENSTOWN -- In a dark and dusty corner of a storeroom, employees at the S.E.W. Friel cannery here recently discovered a wooden box filled with reminders that the lowly tomato was once king on the Eastern Shore.Inside the box were thousands of rare, brass tokens that were used during the first half of the century to pay cannery workers for skinning tomatoes and other vegetables.In the years just after World War I, there were 250 canneries on the Eastern Shore, according to R. Lee Burton Jr., a Cambridge man who wrote a book about the subject.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Contributing Writer | November 15, 1992
As a boy, Stephen B. Billings fished off the point behind the old S. J. Seneca cannery building in Havre de Grace.Now, as project manager for the Seneca Point Luxury Condominiums, he sits a few feet away in a makeshift office where blueprints cover the walls, and workmen install a counter as he talks.On the town's ever-changing waterfront, one thing remains constant -- Mr. Billings' fascination with the historic cannery building."I've always been intrigued by the site," he says. "I always thought there would be a good use for that building.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
Eldersburg Elementary's fourth grade traveled back 100 years in time as it went to work at the Baltimore Museum of Industry yesterday.The 9- and 10-year-old children shucked, canned and steamed rubber oysters. And they made their own cans and printed labels -- stamped with "Eldersburg Elementary."Although they earned token wages, nobody had any take-home pay. They owed it all to the company store.The 49 students participated in the museum's Cannery Children's Activity Center, which simulates the Platt Oyster Canning Co., a late 19th century factory that operated along the city docks.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 10, 2005
A triangular parcel near Baltimore's Canton waterfront will be the setting for one of the first high-profile building projects to get under way locally this year - an addition to the Can Company shopping and office center. Ziger/Snead Architects of Baltimore has designed a 9,500-square-foot retail center that will rise in the 2400 block of Boston St. It will occupy the last vacant development site on the old American Can Co. property, a former cannery that Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse has converted to 200,000 square feet of office and retail space.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1990
SUZZANNE CASH started the day as boss of the oyster shuckers and ended it as president of one of Baltimore's oldest and largest oyster canneries. She liked overseeing the shucking, she said, but she didn't seem to mind taking over the big wooden desk in the office with a view of Baltimore harbor.Just outside the office door, a line of shuckers was working quickly, opening the shells, plucking out the ersatz oysters, putting them in buckets and calling to the loaders for more.Nearby, fillers were waiting to put oysters into cans, cap the containers and send them to the steamer.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | August 27, 1993
The next time you pick up a can of Point Pleasant, Garden Gem or Econobuy tomatoes at the supermarket, you'll be buying into a piece of Harford County history that dates back to the late 1800s.Those labels, found in Klein's, Mars and Acme grocery stores, are canned by BGS Jourdan & Sons of Darlington. The plant, which traces its history to the last century, is the only surviving commercial cannery on Maryland's Western Shore.At one time there were about 50 canneries operating in Harford County and dozens more in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties.
NEWS
By Vincent J. Schodolski and Vincent J. Schodolski,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 1998
MONTEREY, Calif. -- When John Steinbeck looked out across the Monterey Bay waterfront six decades ago, this is what his poet-eye saw:"Cannery Row in Monterey in California is a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light, a tone, a habit, a nostalgia, a dream."That vision, which provided the opening lines for the novel he named after that bustling street of sardine canneries, flophouses, Chinese grocers, prostitutes and Depression-era down-and-outs, was of a place and a time in America long, long past.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1998
When Capt. Isaac Solomon arrived in Calvert County in the late 1860s and purchased the small island that later bore his name, the only thing on the tiny spit of land was a farm and a single house.A businessman and a promoter, Solomon had devised one of the first formulas for successfully canning oysters. He brought over men from the Eastern Shore to dredge oysters and work in his cannery. After the failure and closing of the cannery, the little village and its sparse population remained."For fifty years there was no outside communication with the world except by water.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | May 22, 1995
I recently had the pleasure of being transported by a big yellow bus to a field trip with the fourth-grade class from Sandymount Elementary School. About 90 students, their teachers and several parent chaperons traveled to Baltimore to spend the day at the Museum of Industry.It was the first time I had visited this wonderful building, which offers a variety of workshop re-creations of Baltimore's industrial past.The museum is in an old oyster cannery that dates to 1870, a cannery where children went to work in 1883 shucking oysters and making and labeling cans for distribution.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | August 27, 1993
The next time you pick up a can of Point Pleasant, Garden Gem or Econobuy tomatoes at the supermarket, you'll be buying into a piece of Harford County history that dates back to the late 1800s.Those labels, found in Klein's, Mars and Acme grocery stores, are canned by BGS Jourdan & Sons of Darlington. The plant, which traces its history to the last century, is the only surviving commercial cannery on Maryland's Western Shore.At one time there were about 50 canneries operating in Harford County and dozens more in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
Eldersburg Elementary's fourth grade traveled back 100 years in time as it went to work at the Baltimore Museum of Industry yesterday.The 9- and 10-year-old children shucked, canned and steamed rubber oysters. And they made their own cans and printed labels -- stamped with "Eldersburg Elementary."Although they earned token wages, nobody had any take-home pay. They owed it all to the company store.The 49 students participated in the museum's Cannery Children's Activity Center, which simulates the Platt Oyster Canning Co., a late 19th century factory that operated along the city docks.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
QUEENSTOWN -- In a dark and dusty corner of a storeroom, employees at the S.E.W. Friel cannery here recently discovered a wooden box filled with reminders that the lowly tomato was once king on the Eastern Shore.Inside the box were thousands of rare, brass tokens that were used during the first half of the century to pay cannery workers for skinning tomatoes and other vegetables.In the years just after World War I, there were 250 canneries on the Eastern Shore, according to R. Lee Burton Jr., a Cambridge man who wrote a book about the subject.
FEATURES
March 22, 1992
KUDOS FOR CANNERYEditor: It's a dreary Sunday afternoon in Ocean City, but Rafael Alvarez lifted my spirits with his insightful piece "Cannery Rows" [Feb. 16]. I, too, had a grandmother who lived on Dillon Street, and although she ran her own business, Gonter's Tavern, most of her female friends labored in packinghouses.The Canton area of East Baltimore is rich in folklore and Americana. Could Rafael please do a follow-up story on the corner bakeries and confectionaries that evoke sweet memories for so many of us?
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | May 22, 1995
I recently had the pleasure of being transported by a big yellow bus to a field trip with the fourth-grade class from Sandymount Elementary School. About 90 students, their teachers and several parent chaperons traveled to Baltimore to spend the day at the Museum of Industry.It was the first time I had visited this wonderful building, which offers a variety of workshop re-creations of Baltimore's industrial past.The museum is in an old oyster cannery that dates to 1870, a cannery where children went to work in 1883 shucking oysters and making and labeling cans for distribution.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Contributing Writer | November 15, 1992
As a boy, Stephen B. Billings fished off the point behind the old S. J. Seneca cannery building in Havre de Grace.Now, as project manager for the Seneca Point Luxury Condominiums, he sits a few feet away in a makeshift office where blueprints cover the walls, and workmen install a counter as he talks.On the town's ever-changing waterfront, one thing remains constant -- Mr. Billings' fascination with the historic cannery building."I've always been intrigued by the site," he says. "I always thought there would be a good use for that building.
FEATURES
March 22, 1992
KUDOS FOR CANNERYEditor: It's a dreary Sunday afternoon in Ocean City, but Rafael Alvarez lifted my spirits with his insightful piece "Cannery Rows" [Feb. 16]. I, too, had a grandmother who lived on Dillon Street, and although she ran her own business, Gonter's Tavern, most of her female friends labored in packinghouses.The Canton area of East Baltimore is rich in folklore and Americana. Could Rafael please do a follow-up story on the corner bakeries and confectionaries that evoke sweet memories for so many of us?
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