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By Gary Dretzka and Gary Dretzka,Chicago Tribune | July 16, 1995
Pasadena, Calif. -- It's a safe bet that by the time you're hitting the snooze bar on your clock radio in the morning, Stephen J. Cannell already is hard at work.Every day at 5 a.m., Mr. Cannell sits down at his IBM typewriter in his souvenir-cluttered office at home to write. He'll do this for five hours, then be driven in his limousine to another office, where he oversees a virtual factory of TV shows.Not that the man who has come up with such hit series as "The Rockford Files," "The A-Team," "Baa Baa Black Sheep" and "Wiseguy" has to write for a living anymore.
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 17, 2012
TeleCommunication Systems Inc. is an Annapolis company that's racked up a big portfolio of technology and intellectual property around text messaging and E-911 services. The company's got a mix of government and commercial customers, and it routinely wins multi-million dollar federal contracts. As a result, it's a big employer in the area. But its stock price isn't doing so well. After peaking nearly $10 in late 2009, it's now down to $2.23  as of this morning. And that's got J. Carlo Cannell, managing member of Cannell Capital, apparently worried enough to start pressuring TSYS to come up with a clearer vision, and consider a sale or merger.
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FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 17, 1991
Even in Stephen Cannell's worst pieces of weekly doggerel, there is often a glimmer of hope, a clever character or a nice chunk of dialogue that helps you feel a bit better about sitting there with your kids watching "The A-Team" or "Hardcastle and McCormick" or some other action number from the Cannell assembly line.And, for a few moments in tonight's two-hour premiere, you think that's going to be the case with "Palace Guard," the new CBS entry that gets a two-hour send-off at 9 o'clock on Channel 11 (WBAL)
NEWS
By Betty L. Baboujon and Betty L. Baboujon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2004
It all started with a pan. It was a dull orange silicone with little fluted hollows, sort of like a muffin tin. It might not have looked like much, but I knew what it could do: turn out canneles, the little French cakes I'd fallen for. I snatched it off its rack in a Paris shop, with visions of freshly baked canneles in my own kitchen. Soon after I returned home, I found that the distinctively fluted pans, especially silicone ones, were showing up in stores and catalogs. Some could barely keep them in stock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 21, 2001
Ever notice how much popular fiction is the Book of Job? Take "The Tin Collectors" by Stephen J. Cannell (St. Martin's, 389 pages, $24.95). Almighty God is not bringing down every imaginable plague and woe on Chief Righteous Everyman. The mayor of Los Angeles and his pals are doing it -- to LAPD Detective Sgt. Shane Scully. Don't quibble; if you're an LA cop, there is no Higher Power. Scully -- call him Shane, he's on our side -- cuts a lot of corners off righteousness, which Job never did. But the saga delivers upon him afflictions that are barely bearable.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 17, 2012
TeleCommunication Systems Inc. is an Annapolis company that's racked up a big portfolio of technology and intellectual property around text messaging and E-911 services. The company's got a mix of government and commercial customers, and it routinely wins multi-million dollar federal contracts. As a result, it's a big employer in the area. But its stock price isn't doing so well. After peaking nearly $10 in late 2009, it's now down to $2.23  as of this morning. And that's got J. Carlo Cannell, managing member of Cannell Capital, apparently worried enough to start pressuring TSYS to come up with a clearer vision, and consider a sale or merger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 12, 1999
With the rhetoric flying from all directions last week in the wake of Viacom buying CBS for $38 billion, it was not easy for viewers to understand what the transaction would mean to their lives.Analysts called it a threat to our democratic way of life and the "end of network television as we knew it," without saying who exactly "we" were and what it was we "knew."The Viacom-CBS deal is a major development, but not a watershed moment in broadcasting history. Disney-ABC and Time-Warner were watersheds because they took us into the current super-conglomerate era of network TV. Viacom-CBS is the continuation of that trend, which experts are predicting will culminate in a Sony-NBC deal.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 23, 1990
Stephen Cannell turns out so many series that you can't blame him for repeating himself now and again, but if he's going to rip off his past, why not give us a reprise of "The Rockford Files" or "Tenspeed and Brown Shoe" instead of another "A-Team."That's what you get Saturday night on CBS when "Broken Badges" premieres with a two-hour pilot that will be on Channel 11 (WBAL) at 8 o'clock. It's a bunch of wild and crazy types who careen slightly out of control as they right wrongs and dispense justice, mixing in some mirth with the mayhem.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 31, 1994
A sixtysomething-twentysomething, grandfather-grandson crime fighting team?Holy demographics, Batman!"Traps," which stars George C. Scott and MTV's Dan Cortese, looks like it was created with considerable calculation, one eye firmly on audience demographics.But don't let that keep you from checking it out.While the combination of Cortese and Scott doesn't always click in tonight's premiere on CBS, there are more than enough moments to make this series too good to be dismissed out of hand.
NEWS
By Betty L. Baboujon and Betty L. Baboujon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2004
It all started with a pan. It was a dull orange silicone with little fluted hollows, sort of like a muffin tin. It might not have looked like much, but I knew what it could do: turn out canneles, the little French cakes I'd fallen for. I snatched it off its rack in a Paris shop, with visions of freshly baked canneles in my own kitchen. Soon after I returned home, I found that the distinctively fluted pans, especially silicone ones, were showing up in stores and catalogs. Some could barely keep them in stock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 21, 2001
Ever notice how much popular fiction is the Book of Job? Take "The Tin Collectors" by Stephen J. Cannell (St. Martin's, 389 pages, $24.95). Almighty God is not bringing down every imaginable plague and woe on Chief Righteous Everyman. The mayor of Los Angeles and his pals are doing it -- to LAPD Detective Sgt. Shane Scully. Don't quibble; if you're an LA cop, there is no Higher Power. Scully -- call him Shane, he's on our side -- cuts a lot of corners off righteousness, which Job never did. But the saga delivers upon him afflictions that are barely bearable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 12, 1999
With the rhetoric flying from all directions last week in the wake of Viacom buying CBS for $38 billion, it was not easy for viewers to understand what the transaction would mean to their lives.Analysts called it a threat to our democratic way of life and the "end of network television as we knew it," without saying who exactly "we" were and what it was we "knew."The Viacom-CBS deal is a major development, but not a watershed moment in broadcasting history. Disney-ABC and Time-Warner were watersheds because they took us into the current super-conglomerate era of network TV. Viacom-CBS is the continuation of that trend, which experts are predicting will culminate in a Sony-NBC deal.
FEATURES
By Gary Dretzka and Gary Dretzka,Chicago Tribune | July 16, 1995
Pasadena, Calif. -- It's a safe bet that by the time you're hitting the snooze bar on your clock radio in the morning, Stephen J. Cannell already is hard at work.Every day at 5 a.m., Mr. Cannell sits down at his IBM typewriter in his souvenir-cluttered office at home to write. He'll do this for five hours, then be driven in his limousine to another office, where he oversees a virtual factory of TV shows.Not that the man who has come up with such hit series as "The Rockford Files," "The A-Team," "Baa Baa Black Sheep" and "Wiseguy" has to write for a living anymore.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 31, 1994
A sixtysomething-twentysomething, grandfather-grandson crime fighting team?Holy demographics, Batman!"Traps," which stars George C. Scott and MTV's Dan Cortese, looks like it was created with considerable calculation, one eye firmly on audience demographics.But don't let that keep you from checking it out.While the combination of Cortese and Scott doesn't always click in tonight's premiere on CBS, there are more than enough moments to make this series too good to be dismissed out of hand.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 17, 1991
Even in Stephen Cannell's worst pieces of weekly doggerel, there is often a glimmer of hope, a clever character or a nice chunk of dialogue that helps you feel a bit better about sitting there with your kids watching "The A-Team" or "Hardcastle and McCormick" or some other action number from the Cannell assembly line.And, for a few moments in tonight's two-hour premiere, you think that's going to be the case with "Palace Guard," the new CBS entry that gets a two-hour send-off at 9 o'clock on Channel 11 (WBAL)
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 23, 1990
Stephen Cannell turns out so many series that you can't blame him for repeating himself now and again, but if he's going to rip off his past, why not give us a reprise of "The Rockford Files" or "Tenspeed and Brown Shoe" instead of another "A-Team."That's what you get Saturday night on CBS when "Broken Badges" premieres with a two-hour pilot that will be on Channel 11 (WBAL) at 8 o'clock. It's a bunch of wild and crazy types who careen slightly out of control as they right wrongs and dispense justice, mixing in some mirth with the mayhem.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
An activist investor's push for a sale or merger at TeleCommunication Systems Inc. may be gaining traction. J. Carlo Cannell has been accumulating shares and now holds a roughly 5.8 percent stake in the Annapolis company. In a letter to TCS last week, Cannell called for a sale or merger, citing the company's slumping stock price and lack of strategic direction. Such talk appears to be gathering momentum within the investment community, said analyst Scott Sutherland of Wedbush Securities, who has covered the company for several years.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2006
As the annual flu season looms, some scientists have this question on their minds: Why now? For more than a century, physicians have recognized that influenza sweeps the Northern Hemisphere during the winter months, typically peaking here between late December and March. Over the years they've floated numerous theories to explain the seasonal flu spike - blaming everything from the flood of frigid air to the wintertime tendency of people to huddle indoors. Yet these explanations "remain astonishingly superficial and full of inconsistencies," says Dr. Scott Dowell, director of the Global Disease Protection Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
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