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By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Staff | February 1, 2004
Jason King, on 'Texada Timewarp': Superbly perfumed flowery aroma and flavor ... very nice, cerebral ... King's take on 'Sweet Skunk': Quite complex -- pungent on the inhale, super sweet on the exhale ... Like an overripe mango ... thick skunky tones ... intense yet manageable. And 'Princess Bob'? King gives it a definite thumbs up: Velvety flavor ... exactly like those little blue marshmallows in Boo Berry cereal ... blooms and mounts in a sublime crescendo, then lingers for an eternity ... Powerful and psychedelic, it gave me light hallucinations and an inability to stop laughing.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014
Rep. Andy Harris offered up the prohibitionist's minority point of view regarding marijuana ( "Marijuana decriminalization: up in smoke," April 1). Fact is, if he represents his constituents, he will support ending cannabis prohibition immediately since the majority of Americans no long support it or want to pay for it. Cannabis prohibition has been one of America's worst policy failures in history, dependent on lies, half-truths and propaganda which are being exposed like never before.
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NEWS
February 1, 2010
E veryone has heard the horror stories from California, which after passing a 1996 law legalizing the medical use of marijuana for patients with cancer and other serious illnesses found itself awash in pot shops and physicians who seemed all too eager to hand out cannabis prescriptions to anyone who asked, regardless of the complaint. California is belatedly moving to correct the worst abuses of that law, but the sheer number of loosely regulated pot dispensaries and pharmacies that sprang up after its passage is making reform an uphill struggle.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
For years, patients in Maryland with intractable pain, chronic diseases or terminal diseases have lobbied lawmakers to legalize the medical use of marijuana to ease their symptoms. And for years the state has been torn between compassion and caution about whether the purported benefits of medical marijuana outweigh the potential dangers of a drug that has not been subjected to rigorous scientific testing to determine its safety and effectiveness. As a result, Maryland law on the issue has remained an inconsistent jumble.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
Rep. Andy Harris offered up the prohibitionist's minority point of view regarding marijuana ( "Marijuana decriminalization: up in smoke," April 1). Fact is, if he represents his constituents, he will support ending cannabis prohibition immediately since the majority of Americans no long support it or want to pay for it. Cannabis prohibition has been one of America's worst policy failures in history, dependent on lies, half-truths and propaganda which are being exposed like never before.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
The national debate over legalizing marijuana should be guided as much as possible by facts ("Stirring the pot," Nov. 12). Although marijuana is listed by the DEA as a "Schedule 1" drug - the same category as heroin - the notion that cannabis is as dangerous as heroin is false. There is no scientific or medical evidence that supports lumping together marijuana and heroin. The 1972 decision to label marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug was heavily influenced by political considerations and was opposed by the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Michael Slackman and Michael Slackman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2001
BEKAA VALLEY, Lebanon - For seven years, Abu Mohammed tried to support his wife and five children by growing melons. But there was never enough water, and even when weather conditions were good, no one wanted to buy his produce. So now he's cultivating a crop sure to sell: Cannabis sativa, the spiky, olive-green plant used to produce hashish. "To us, this is just a crop," he says as he checks his plot, stretching the length of a football field alongside the main road in this sunburned valley in northeastern Lebanon.
NEWS
By Eric Bailey and Eric Bailey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 11, 2004
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. - After nearly four decades in medicine, Dr. David Bearman seems the incarnation of a trusted old-school physician. His resume is long, his record unblemished. It's his choice of treatment that makes him conspicuous. For most patients, Bearman recommends the same remedy: marijuana. There is the young lady with epileptic seizures, the middle-age man with multiple sclerosis, the amputee bedeviled by phantom limb pain. Bearman's practice, based on a controversial curative not found on pharmacy shelves, has proved both lonely and professionally perilous.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | March 2, 2004
CHICAGO -- Modern cancer treatments have saved countless lives, but they can be a cruelly mixed blessing. Chemotherapy, often indispensable in curing cancer, sometimes is enough to make you ill, causing violent nausea and vomiting. Luckily, there is a well-established and safe remedy recommended by many cancer physicians that sometimes provides relief when nothing else can. Not so luckily, the remedy is marijuana. Under federal law, cannabis is forbidden -- even for therapeutic use by seriously ill people who have no more interest in getting high than they do in bungee jumping.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | October 8, 2007
Through all his years in politics, despite the endless obligation to shake hands, smile for the cameras and coax money out of contributors, Sen. John McCain has somehow avoided becoming a complete phony. Annoy Mr. McCain, and you won't have to wait long to find out. Even a sickly, soft-spoken woman in a wheelchair gets no pass from him. The other day, at a meeting with voters in New Hampshire, Linda Macia mentioned her use of medical marijuana and politely asked his position on permitting it. Barely were the words out of her mouth before Mr. McCain spun on his heel, stalked away and heaped scorn on the idea.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
The national debate over legalizing marijuana should be guided as much as possible by facts ("Stirring the pot," Nov. 12). Although marijuana is listed by the DEA as a "Schedule 1" drug - the same category as heroin - the notion that cannabis is as dangerous as heroin is false. There is no scientific or medical evidence that supports lumping together marijuana and heroin. The 1972 decision to label marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug was heavily influenced by political considerations and was opposed by the American Medical Association.
NEWS
February 28, 2011
Maryland's current law on medical marijuana doesn't make a lot of sense. Rather than outlawing it completely or, as several states have now done, creating a controlled system allowing those with certain medical conditions access to the drug, Maryland has taken the approach of keeping marijuana illegal but allowing those caught with small amounts of it to claim medical necessity as a defense. If the judge buys it, the penalty drops to a $100 fine. While this system has the virtue of simplicity — no thorny questions for legislators and regulators about what diseases qualify as medical necessity, no licensing of growers or dispensers — it forces patients to buy drugs illegally and leaves the state with no real idea of how many of them are using the drug and to what effect.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
Everyone has heard the horror stories from California, which after passing a 1996 law legalizing the medical use of marijuana for patients with cancer and other serious illnesses found itself awash in pot shops and physicians who seemed all too eager to hand out cannabis prescriptions to anyone who asked, regardless of the complaint. California is belatedly moving to correct the worst abuses of that law, but the sheer number of loosely regulated pot dispensaries and pharmacies that sprang up after its passage is making reform an uphill struggle.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | October 8, 2007
Through all his years in politics, despite the endless obligation to shake hands, smile for the cameras and coax money out of contributors, Sen. John McCain has somehow avoided becoming a complete phony. Annoy Mr. McCain, and you won't have to wait long to find out. Even a sickly, soft-spoken woman in a wheelchair gets no pass from him. The other day, at a meeting with voters in New Hampshire, Linda Macia mentioned her use of medical marijuana and politely asked his position on permitting it. Barely were the words out of her mouth before Mr. McCain spun on his heel, stalked away and heaped scorn on the idea.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | May 22, 2006
CHICAGO -- Recently, Mexican President Vicente Fox vetoed a bill passed by the Mexican Congress that would have removed criminal penalties for people caught with small amounts of marijuana or other drugs. This came after the Bush administration vigorously complained, predicting it would encourage Americans to pour southward as "drug tourists." But that option is off the table for the moment. So Americans who want to get high without fear of going to jail will have to go some other place where cannabis can be consumed with impunity.
NEWS
By Eric Bailey and Eric Bailey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 11, 2004
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. - After nearly four decades in medicine, Dr. David Bearman seems the incarnation of a trusted old-school physician. His resume is long, his record unblemished. It's his choice of treatment that makes him conspicuous. For most patients, Bearman recommends the same remedy: marijuana. There is the young lady with epileptic seizures, the middle-age man with multiple sclerosis, the amputee bedeviled by phantom limb pain. Bearman's practice, based on a controversial curative not found on pharmacy shelves, has proved both lonely and professionally perilous.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | May 22, 2006
CHICAGO -- Recently, Mexican President Vicente Fox vetoed a bill passed by the Mexican Congress that would have removed criminal penalties for people caught with small amounts of marijuana or other drugs. This came after the Bush administration vigorously complained, predicting it would encourage Americans to pour southward as "drug tourists." But that option is off the table for the moment. So Americans who want to get high without fear of going to jail will have to go some other place where cannabis can be consumed with impunity.
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