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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 16, 2000
A Laurel businessman pleaded guilty in federal court in Greenbelt to illegally leaving nine canisters of highly toxic chlorine gas in a business park off U.S. 1, the U.S. attorney's office announced. Richard Fletcher, 46, faces a maximum of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, plus restitution for the cost of the cleanup, for violating the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act by failing to notify authorities of the dumping, prosecutors said Thursday.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, Andrea Siegel and Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Police shot and killed a gunman wearing what appeared to be explosives after he took three people hostage at the Discovery Channel's headquarters Wednesday afternoon, officials said. The building was to reopen briefly Thursday for employees to return, although the lobby remained closed as police investigate. Authorities identified the gunman as James J. Lee. Lee, 43, who was upset with the channel over its programming and had a history of protesting the company, entered the building at Georgia Avenue and Colesville Road about 1 p.m., wielding a gun and wearing silver canisters later described as "explosive devices," and "told everyone to stop moving," according to police.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
After years of neglect, the air-filtration system at the long-dormant Monument Street Landfill in East Baltimore has been replaced, and the city has begun monitoring air and water near the landfill, officials said.The action came after the Maryland Department of Environment threatened the city last month with unspecified "enforcement action" if it did not replace carbon canisters used to treat methane and other gases rising from the landfill within 15 days.The 19 canisters were replaced between Aug. 21 and Aug. 23, the Department of Public Works said.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | March 2, 2007
Glenn Dale-based TVI Corp. reported improved sales for the fourth quarter and year while profit continued to dwindle. But based on orders so far this year and new products in the pipeline, officials say 2007 should be a turning point for the fledgling company. TVI, which sells collapsible shelters and decontamination systems to first responders, hospitals and the military, has struggled with cash flow problems, which officials have blamed on the uncertainty of government contracts. But armed with a new contract from the U.S. Army to begin long-awaited production of its line of filter canisters, which are used in face masks to guard against chemical warfare, TVI President and Chief Executive Officer Richard V. Priddy believes the company is on a new course.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1996
Two mysterious canisters were discovered last month at an Aberdeen Proving Ground cleanup site, and base officials are asking the Navy to use high-tech equipment to find out what's inside.Workers found the two 5-gallon canisters Feb. 21, lodged inside a 4-by-8-foot piece of concrete at the 26th Street mediation site near the Bush River."They took radiological, chemical and biological" tests, said proving ground spokesman John Yaquiant. "They got no readings for anything."Navy technicians will use X-ray equipment to peer inside the canisters as early as this week, he said, adding that the canisters are in a secure area.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 1996
MIAMI -- Passengers' terrified shouts of "Fire! Fire! Fire!" echoed from the smoke-filled cabin as flames spread rapidly through a ValuJet airliner over the Florida Everglades in May, transcripts of cockpit recordings revealed yesterday."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - Pashtun tribal leaders in eastern Afghanistan have largely refused to cooperate with U.S. special operations forces in their hunt for al-Qaida and Taliban fighters, weapons caches and intelligence that could prevent future terrorist attacks, military officials said yesterday. The rebuff, which comes as the Pentagon disclosed the discovery near Kabul of two canisters that could contain deadly chemicals, has left U.S. forces with few Afghan allies in one of the most dangerous regions of the country.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 17, 1996
MIAMI -- With the help of a workhorse helicopter, investigators waged a macabre tug-of-war with the Everglades muck yesterday, yanking out bigger and bigger chunks of the fallen ValuJet DC-9, including parts of the fuselage, wings and landing gear.These new pieces, along with the two engines pulled from the mud around dawn, will help accident reconstructionists assemble a two-dimensional model of the jetliner, now taking shape inside a hangar at Tamiami Airport.The effort was as remarkable for what the huge Hi-Lift chopper pulled out as it was for what it failed to dislodge from the oozing peat below: One big section of either a wing or a fuselage was so deeply embedded in the muck that "we couldn't get ahold of it," said Robert Francis, vice chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
January 17, 2002
FOR more than a half-century, the white canisters of toxic mustard agent have rested in open storage stacks at Eagle Point on Aberdeen Proving Ground. The Army finally decided five years ago on a plan to destroy these sinister relics of chemical warfare, which can blister the lungs and eyes and cause cancer. The cleanup deadline was to be 2006. Spurred by fears of terrorism following the Sept. 11 attacks, the Army last month abruptly accelerated the timetable to finish the job at the Harford County military base this year.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 24, 1995
*TC FALLBROOK, Calif. -- Just west of this quiet farming community -- a continent away from the stark, black wall in Washington that commemorates Americans killed in Vietnam -- are three weedy and rocky fields that are host to an equally chilling, if less dignified, memorial to the same war.The fields, part of the sprawling Fallbrook Naval Weapons Station, contain an enduring symbol of that divisive conflict: more than 35,000 canisters filled with 23...
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | August 15, 2006
GLENN DALE -- Whether a hurricane or a chemical cloud, Glenn Dale-based TVI Corp. wants to equip those responding to the scene. The small company has been around for nearly three decades, trying to find its niche. It spent five years in bankruptcy, its stock sold for pennies and a former chief executive pleaded guilty to embezzlement. Now it believes it's found its footing in the growing homeland defense market. Its rapidly deployable tents and shelters were used in regions devastated by Hurricane Katrina.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | September 24, 2005
The Soda Club What it is: -- Machines and supplies to make carbonated beverages at home. How it works: -- Soda Club drink syrups come in bottles that hold enough to make 12 liters of soda. You'll also need canisters of carbon dioxide. Each canister carbonates about 110 liters of soda. You have to ship the old canister back to Soda Club when you order a replacement. What it costs: -- The syrup and carbon dioxide to make one liter of Soda Club soda cost about 42 cents to 50 cents, depending on the flavor.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN FOOD EDITOR | June 23, 2004
A ZESTY DIFFERENCE Looking to add a little zip to your grilled meat and vegetables? Try Argentine chimichurri sauce. Although there are different versions, the basic sauce is a zesty combination of pepper, vinegar, garlic and parsley that can be used as a marinade or finishing sauce. Try spooning it onto grilled steak or mixing it into potato salad. Here's a recipe, courtesy of McCormick & Co.: Combine 1 cup of packed fresh flat-leaf parsley, 1/3 cup olive oil, 1/4 cup red-wine vinegar, 3 garlic cloves, 1/2 teaspoon thyme leaves, 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper and 1/2 teaspoon of salt into a food processor and puree.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - Pashtun tribal leaders in eastern Afghanistan have largely refused to cooperate with U.S. special operations forces in their hunt for al-Qaida and Taliban fighters, weapons caches and intelligence that could prevent future terrorist attacks, military officials said yesterday. The rebuff, which comes as the Pentagon disclosed the discovery near Kabul of two canisters that could contain deadly chemicals, has left U.S. forces with few Afghan allies in one of the most dangerous regions of the country.
NEWS
January 17, 2002
FOR more than a half-century, the white canisters of toxic mustard agent have rested in open storage stacks at Eagle Point on Aberdeen Proving Ground. The Army finally decided five years ago on a plan to destroy these sinister relics of chemical warfare, which can blister the lungs and eyes and cause cancer. The cleanup deadline was to be 2006. Spurred by fears of terrorism following the Sept. 11 attacks, the Army last month abruptly accelerated the timetable to finish the job at the Harford County military base this year.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
In response to continued security concerns after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, Aberdeen Proving Ground officials said yesterday the installation plans to build reinforced "igloos" to store 1,815 canisters of mustard agent that are kept in an open yard in the Edgewood area. The igloos, which will cost about $9 million and take eight months to build, will be made of corrugated steel covered with earth, said Maj. William P. Huber, commander of Edgewood Chemical Activity, the proving ground organization responsible for storing the agent.
NEWS
November 25, 1990
Two employees with the Army Armament, Munitions and Chemical Command Element at the U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center and one CRDEC employee received awards for outstanding contributions to the Department of Defense Chemical Retaliatory Program during fiscal year 1989.William M. Childers, quality assurance specialist, and Jimmy D.Pennington, general engineer, both with AMCCOM, along with Robert S. Dean, chemical engineer with CRDEC, were honored at a ceremony where they were presented Producibility Engineering Award plaques.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1996
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Hoping to learn how fire doomed ValuJet Flight 592, federal investigators will re-create a raging blaze in another airplane's cargo bay today and tomorrow.They will load cardboard boxes of oxygen-generating canisters and some inflated tires into the mock-up, the items that were in Flight 592's forward cargo hold.Then, some of the oxygen canisters, which can heat up to 500 degrees, will be activated.They are suspected of either starting or feeding Flight 592's fire.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 16, 2000
A Laurel businessman pleaded guilty in federal court in Greenbelt to illegally leaving nine canisters of highly toxic chlorine gas in a business park off U.S. 1, the U.S. attorney's office announced. Richard Fletcher, 46, faces a maximum of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, plus restitution for the cost of the cleanup, for violating the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act by failing to notify authorities of the dumping, prosecutors said Thursday.
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