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By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2005
The city police detective who interrogated two men accused of slashing the throats of three children last May said yesterday that the younger suspect was "the coldest person" he had ever interviewed. Sgt. Darryl Massey's testimony came during the second day of pretrial motions for Adan Canela, 18, and Policarpio Espinoza, 23. Both are charged with first-degree murder in the killings of Canela's young cousins, two 9-year-olds and a 10-year-old. Espinoza is an uncle of Canela and the dead children.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Adan Espinoza Canela pleaded guilty on Thursday to slashing the throats of three young relatives, more than nine years after the children's beaten and bloodied bodies were found in a Northwest Baltimore apartment . Espinoza Canela, 26, was sentenced to 30 years in prison Thursday. He will be eligible for parole by 2019. His uncle, Policarpio Espinoza Perez, 31, was convicted this year of conspiracy to commit murder for his part in the killings and sentenced to life in prison.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2005
A woman whose 10-year-old son was slain last year along with two younger cousins testified yesterday that one of the men on trial in the killings, and the man's father, had made overtures toward her. Maria Andrea Espejo Quezada said Adan Canela, 18, had called her about one month before the children were killed and asked her for a "favor." Quezada said she was 38 years old at the time and believed Canela was in his early 20s. "He started telling me that he had never had a girlfriend," she testified.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
A Baltimore judge postponed the trial of a second man accused of nearly beheading three young relatives nine years ago until October so that lawyers have more time to prepare arguments on DNA evidence. Adan Canela, 26, is charged with multiple murder and conspiracy counts in the deaths of three of his young relatives, who were killed in May 2004. His uncle, Policarpio Espinoza Perez, 31, was convicted on murder conspiracy charges in the case earlier this year and sentenced to life in prison last month.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | January 28, 2009
The 2006 trial of Adan Canela and Policarpio Espinoza was one of the longest in Baltimore history - stretching two months and including 21 days of testimony about the near-beheadings of three of their young relatives. The jury passed 31 notes to the judge before finding the men guilty. But yesterday, attorneys for Canela and Espinoza were back in court for an unusual proceeding that could get their clients a new trial. They allege that retired Circuit Judge David B. Mitchell never shared some of those jury notes with defense attorneys.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2004
The murder trial of two men accused of slitting the throats of three of their young relatives in Northwest Baltimore likely won't begin until this spring, but a judge determined yesterday that the relationship of the men's attorneys does not constitute a conflict of interest. The first-degree murder trial of Policarpio Espinoza, 22, and Adan Canela was scheduled to begin yesterday, but instead Baltimore Circuit Judge Kaye Allison ruled on a motion from prosecutors that asked for a clarification of the potential conflict between the defense attorneys.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
The decision to hold a joint trial for the two Mexican immigrants accused of killing their three young relatives appears to be hampering prosecutors' ability to use a once-critical piece of evidence: a tape-recorded statement by the elder defendant that implicates the younger one. Outraged defense attorneys requested a mistrial yesterday as prosecutors played a portion of that statement for the jury that a judge had previously ruled to be inappropriate....
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
The mother of a 10-year-old boy who along with his two younger cousins was killed last year in a Northwest Baltimore apartment began testifying yesterday in the trial of two men charged with the murders. Maria Andrea Espejo Quezada, who speaks little English, was visibly upset as a prosecutor questioned her about finding her son's nearly decapitated body May 27, 2004. Quezada referred to the killings as "the accident, the tragedy." The children's uncle, Policarpio Espinoza, 23, and cousin, Adan Canela, 18, are on trial in Baltimore Circuit Court, facing three counts of first-degree murder and conspiracy charges.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Ryan Davis and Allison Klein and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
A bloody glove discovered in a car trunk links the uncle of three Mexican children killed in Northwest Baltimore to their deaths, sources familiar with the investigation said after seeing the results of DNA testing. The glove was found in the trunk of Policarpio Espinoza's car, and tests on it revealed his blood and the blood of one of the children, said the sources, who asked not to be identified because of a court-imposed gag order in the case. The blood evidence appears to conflict with the account given to police by Espinoza, 22, who is charged in the May killings, the sources said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2005
In testimony that seemed ripped from a script of the television show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, a forensic scientist told jurors yesterday how he collected tiny amounts of evidence that is being used in the trial of two men accused of slashing the throats of three young relatives. Salvatore Bianca, who worked for the Baltimore Police Department for three decades until he retired in January, testified about 11 spots of suspected blood on two left-handed work gloves found in a car that was used by the defendants.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
A date has been set for the third trial of two men, illegal immigrants from Mexico, charged with murder in the deaths of three young relatives in a Baltimore apartment in 2004. Policarpio Espinoza Perez, 29, and Adan Espinoza Canela, 24, also again pleaded not guilty Thursday. They have been held in custody since their arrests seven years ago, and are now scheduled to be tried again Nov. 10 in Baltimore Circuit Court. The first trial ended in a hung jury, and the second resulted in convictions that were later overturned because of a judge's error.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | January 28, 2009
The 2006 trial of Adan Canela and Policarpio Espinoza was one of the longest in Baltimore history - stretching two months and including 21 days of testimony about the near-beheadings of three of their young relatives. The jury passed 31 notes to the judge before finding the men guilty. But yesterday, attorneys for Canela and Espinoza were back in court for an unusual proceeding that could get their clients a new trial. They allege that retired Circuit Judge David B. Mitchell never shared some of those jury notes with defense attorneys.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
Family members are again playing a critical part in the Baltimore retrial of a pair of Mexican immigrants accused of slashing the throats of their three young relatives - and their testimony has again added more mystery to a disturbing crime with no clear motive. The defendants, Policarpio Espinoza, 24, and Adan Canela, 19, are an uncle and a cousin, respectively, of the slain children. The first trial ended in a hung jury last summer, and some jurors said it was difficult to reach a verdict in part because of confusing testimony by the family.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2005
In testimony that seemed ripped from a script of the television show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, a forensic scientist told jurors yesterday how he collected tiny amounts of evidence that is being used in the trial of two men accused of slashing the throats of three young relatives. Salvatore Bianca, who worked for the Baltimore Police Department for three decades until he retired in January, testified about 11 spots of suspected blood on two left-handed work gloves found in a car that was used by the defendants.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2005
A woman whose 10-year-old son was slain last year along with two younger cousins testified yesterday that one of the men on trial in the killings, and the man's father, had made overtures toward her. Maria Andrea Espejo Quezada said Adan Canela, 18, had called her about one month before the children were killed and asked her for a "favor." Quezada said she was 38 years old at the time and believed Canela was in his early 20s. "He started telling me that he had never had a girlfriend," she testified.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
The mother of a 10-year-old boy who along with his two younger cousins was killed last year in a Northwest Baltimore apartment began testifying yesterday in the trial of two men charged with the murders. Maria Andrea Espejo Quezada, who speaks little English, was visibly upset as a prosecutor questioned her about finding her son's nearly decapitated body May 27, 2004. Quezada referred to the killings as "the accident, the tragedy." The children's uncle, Policarpio Espinoza, 23, and cousin, Adan Canela, 18, are on trial in Baltimore Circuit Court, facing three counts of first-degree murder and conspiracy charges.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
Family members are again playing a critical part in the Baltimore retrial of a pair of Mexican immigrants accused of slashing the throats of their three young relatives - and their testimony has again added more mystery to a disturbing crime with no clear motive. The defendants, Policarpio Espinoza, 24, and Adan Canela, 19, are an uncle and a cousin, respectively, of the slain children. The first trial ended in a hung jury last summer, and some jurors said it was difficult to reach a verdict in part because of confusing testimony by the family.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Adan Espinoza Canela pleaded guilty on Thursday to slashing the throats of three young relatives, more than nine years after the children's beaten and bloodied bodies were found in a Northwest Baltimore apartment . Espinoza Canela, 26, was sentenced to 30 years in prison Thursday. He will be eligible for parole by 2019. His uncle, Policarpio Espinoza Perez, 31, was convicted this year of conspiracy to commit murder for his part in the killings and sentenced to life in prison.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
The decision to hold a joint trial for the two Mexican immigrants accused of killing their three young relatives appears to be hampering prosecutors' ability to use a once-critical piece of evidence: a tape-recorded statement by the elder defendant that implicates the younger one. Outraged defense attorneys requested a mistrial yesterday as prosecutors played a portion of that statement for the jury that a judge had previously ruled to be inappropriate....
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2005
The city police detective who interrogated two men accused of slashing the throats of three children last May said yesterday that the younger suspect was "the coldest person" he had ever interviewed. Sgt. Darryl Massey's testimony came during the second day of pretrial motions for Adan Canela, 18, and Policarpio Espinoza, 23. Both are charged with first-degree murder in the killings of Canela's young cousins, two 9-year-olds and a 10-year-old. Espinoza is an uncle of Canela and the dead children.
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