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By Newsday | August 25, 1999
This recipe to feed a crowd, from "Dinner at Miss Lady's: Memories and Recipes From a Southern Childhood" by Luann Landon (Algonquin Books, $19.95), uses egg yolks with wild abandon. It is useful to know how to make a boiled dressing as well as a homemade mayonnaise; they make a simple dish like chicken salad company-worthy.Homemade MayonnaiseMakes 2 cups4 egg yolks2 cups light olive oil, peanut oil or canola oilsalt and pepper to taste2 tablespoons (or more, to taste) white-wine vinegarUsing an electric mixer and small bowl, beat egg yolks on low speed for 2 minutes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun and By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Doris Smithson from Greeneville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for making "Stained Glass" candy. She said she used to buy bags of this colorful homemade treat at a church bazaar in Lexington, Ky., around the Christmas holidays and that it made great stocking stuffers. Wendy Sutula from Jessup shared her family recipe for what she calls Christmas candy that is almost certainly the recipe Smithson sought. While Sutula said making the candy is a rather time-consuming process, the end result is amazing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun and By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Doris Smithson from Greeneville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for making "Stained Glass" candy. She said she used to buy bags of this colorful homemade treat at a church bazaar in Lexington, Ky., around the Christmas holidays and that it made great stocking stuffers. Wendy Sutula from Jessup shared her family recipe for what she calls Christmas candy that is almost certainly the recipe Smithson sought. While Sutula said making the candy is a rather time-consuming process, the end result is amazing.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Larney Birkenbach from Parkville was looking for a recipe for making chocolate toffee apples. He said that back in the 1950s there was a street vendor in downtown Baltimore who made them and sold them on sticks. Nowadays, these goodies are available this time of year in many grocery stores and farmers' markets, but they can be a bit expensive, and it's easy to make them at home. Dorothy Griffith from Sparks sent in a recipe she clipped some years ago from the Recipe Finder column.
FEATURES
By Marlene Sorosky and Marlene Sorosky,Special to The Sun | February 6, 1994
Long ago, when I was a starry-eyed 20-year-old, and for centuries before that, Valentine's Day was a celebration for lovers only. As far as we know, it all began in Roman times, when the festival of Lupercalia celebrated Juno and marriage. Later, when the Church linked this event with the day of St. Valentine, a bishop who was executed in 270 A.D. for holding weddings against the edict of the Roman emperor, Feb. 14 became a day for sweethearts to express their affection. Through the years, a card, a rose and a box of candy said it all.Now, while the basic concept of the holiday hasn't changed, the scope of its meaning has broadened considerably.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2001
Ah, fudge. Of all the holiday candies, fudge may be the most popular and best-loved. For novice candy makers, it can also be the most feared. There are plenty of shortcut recipes, but the real stuff takes a fair amount of boiling, along with a good candy thermometer or, better yet, enough experience to judge cooking stages by other means, such as dropping a spoonful into ice water and assessing the results. For all its rewards, fudge-making can as easily produce a potful of frustration as a batch of pure delight.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | January 23, 1992
Underwear as outerwearMadonna may have started it all several years ago when she began performing in bra tops and bustiers, but the idea of lingerie worn as outerwear has now taken on a life of its own. Bare little dresses cut like slips have become standard fare at the trendiest clubs and cocktail parties. Come spring, expect to XTC see even more lingerie-inspired party clothes -- dresses featuring built-in bras and delicate nylon lingerie lace edging necklines and shoulder straps.One of the most popular new fabric combinations also happens to be black lace layered over nude or blush-colored satin, a look hitherto more common in the boudoir than the ballroom.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 12, 1997
APPRECIATIVE eaters keep cooks going. Rather than just shoveling down the grub without saying a word, an eater who observes, "This was better than the last time," makes a cook feel treasured. And when an appreciative eater not only requests a favorite dish, but also offers to help prepare it, few cooks can refuse him.That is what happened in our family last weekend when the teen-ager woke up with a craving for homemade doughnuts. He remembered the doughnuts he and his mother had cooked several years ago.Those doughnuts were so good, the teen-ager told his mother.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1997
Hazel Landman of Sioux Falls, S.D., remembers sponge candy as a childhood treat. "Years ago when we lived out West, we purchased sponge candy that was in a brick form like a pound of butter, and you would cut off your own pieces. I found a recipe for it, but when I put it in the pan, it falls in the center. Could someone give me a more proven recipe?"Evelyn Arnold of Westminster submitted the following recipe.Sponge candyMakes 1 pound of candy1 cup sugar1 cup dark corn syrup1 tablespoon vinegar1 tablespoon baking sodaCombine sugar, corn syrup and vinegar in heavy saucepan.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Larney Birkenbach from Parkville was looking for a recipe for making chocolate toffee apples. He said that back in the 1950s there was a street vendor in downtown Baltimore who made them and sold them on sticks. Nowadays, these goodies are available this time of year in many grocery stores and farmers' markets, but they can be a bit expensive, and it's easy to make them at home. Dorothy Griffith from Sparks sent in a recipe she clipped some years ago from the Recipe Finder column.
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | December 3, 2006
Christmas memories are tucked deep away in our consciousness for most of the year. Then something happens. The first snowfall, a favorite carol playing on the radio, a house lit up for Christmas ... and suddenly it hits. Those wonderful memories come flooding back. When it hits me, the first thing I want to do is dig out my favorite holiday CDs. For starters, I like A Charlie Brown Christmas. It's light and fun and the perfect music for getting the storage boxes of Christmas stuff from the attic - decorations, strings of lights and ornaments.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2001
Ah, fudge. Of all the holiday candies, fudge may be the most popular and best-loved. For novice candy makers, it can also be the most feared. There are plenty of shortcut recipes, but the real stuff takes a fair amount of boiling, along with a good candy thermometer or, better yet, enough experience to judge cooking stages by other means, such as dropping a spoonful into ice water and assessing the results. For all its rewards, fudge-making can as easily produce a potful of frustration as a batch of pure delight.
FEATURES
By Newsday | August 25, 1999
This recipe to feed a crowd, from "Dinner at Miss Lady's: Memories and Recipes From a Southern Childhood" by Luann Landon (Algonquin Books, $19.95), uses egg yolks with wild abandon. It is useful to know how to make a boiled dressing as well as a homemade mayonnaise; they make a simple dish like chicken salad company-worthy.Homemade MayonnaiseMakes 2 cups4 egg yolks2 cups light olive oil, peanut oil or canola oilsalt and pepper to taste2 tablespoons (or more, to taste) white-wine vinegarUsing an electric mixer and small bowl, beat egg yolks on low speed for 2 minutes.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | September 30, 1998
Pecan pralines was the request of Linda L. Heyer of Waverly Iowa, who says she thinks the recipe may had been inside a Gold Medal or Pillsbury flour bag sometime in the '50s or '60s.Ruth Barsanti of Crystal Lake, Ill., responded with the Betty Crocker recipe that tester Laura Reiley chose.Pecan PralinesMakes about a dozen 2-inch candies1 cup granulated sugar1 cup brown sugar, packed1/2 cup light cream1/4 teaspoon salt2 tablespoons butter or margarine1 cup pecan halvesLightly butter a sheet of aluminum foil.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 12, 1997
APPRECIATIVE eaters keep cooks going. Rather than just shoveling down the grub without saying a word, an eater who observes, "This was better than the last time," makes a cook feel treasured. And when an appreciative eater not only requests a favorite dish, but also offers to help prepare it, few cooks can refuse him.That is what happened in our family last weekend when the teen-ager woke up with a craving for homemade doughnuts. He remembered the doughnuts he and his mother had cooked several years ago.Those doughnuts were so good, the teen-ager told his mother.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1997
Hazel Landman of Sioux Falls, S.D., remembers sponge candy as a childhood treat. "Years ago when we lived out West, we purchased sponge candy that was in a brick form like a pound of butter, and you would cut off your own pieces. I found a recipe for it, but when I put it in the pan, it falls in the center. Could someone give me a more proven recipe?"Evelyn Arnold of Westminster submitted the following recipe.Sponge candyMakes 1 pound of candy1 cup sugar1 cup dark corn syrup1 tablespoon vinegar1 tablespoon baking sodaCombine sugar, corn syrup and vinegar in heavy saucepan.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | September 30, 1998
Pecan pralines was the request of Linda L. Heyer of Waverly Iowa, who says she thinks the recipe may had been inside a Gold Medal or Pillsbury flour bag sometime in the '50s or '60s.Ruth Barsanti of Crystal Lake, Ill., responded with the Betty Crocker recipe that tester Laura Reiley chose.Pecan PralinesMakes about a dozen 2-inch candies1 cup granulated sugar1 cup brown sugar, packed1/2 cup light cream1/4 teaspoon salt2 tablespoons butter or margarine1 cup pecan halvesLightly butter a sheet of aluminum foil.
FEATURES
By David Grist and David Grist,Eating Well Magazine United Feature Syndicate | November 27, 1994
The marvelous manipulation of sugar crystals and chocolate is not just for professionals. With a good candy thermometer and a sturdy, heavy-bottomed pot, your kitchen can become a confectionery. And, in the home kitchen, it's possible to make lower-fat indulgences. Our recipes are inspired by the traditional candy shop, but dried fruits and chestnut puree stand in for fatty creams, and chocolate is used in moderation. Yet these candies are absolutely scrumptious.NTC Cooking sugar: Using the correct technique for cooking sugar syrups is critical to the success of many candy recipes.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1996
Swedish meatballs made with grape jelly? Now that's a combination you shouldn't ignore.B. Roemer of Baltimore requested the meatball recipe. She noted that it had a sauce made with many things, including grape jelly.Chef Gilles Syglowski chose the response of Lesley Dederer of Cockeysville, who wrote that the recipe was from the "Elegant But Easy" cookbook, 1976.Dederer's meatballsMakes 50 to 60 meatballs2 pounds ground meat1 slightly beaten egg1 12-ounce bottle chili sauce1 10-ounce jar grape jelly1 large grated onionjuice of 1 lemonsalt to tasteMix meat, egg, onion and salt and shape into small balls.
FEATURES
By David Grist and David Grist,Eating Well Magazine United Feature Syndicate | November 27, 1994
The marvelous manipulation of sugar crystals and chocolate is not just for professionals. With a good candy thermometer and a sturdy, heavy-bottomed pot, your kitchen can become a confectionery. And, in the home kitchen, it's possible to make lower-fat indulgences. Our recipes are inspired by the traditional candy shop, but dried fruits and chestnut puree stand in for fatty creams, and chocolate is used in moderation. Yet these candies are absolutely scrumptious.NTC Cooking sugar: Using the correct technique for cooking sugar syrups is critical to the success of many candy recipes.
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