Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCandy Corn
IN THE NEWS

Candy Corn

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | October 29, 2007
"Candy corn is the only candy in the history of America that's never been advertised. And there's a reason. All of the candy corn that was ever made was made in 1911." - Comedian Lewis Black Nice try, but that's wrong. Candy corn happened to have been first mass-produced by the Goelitz Candy Co. in 1898. So, technically, all the candy corn ever made dates back to 1898 and not 1911. Wednesday is Halloween, and the candy corn debate once again has raised its ugly cone head. Tomorrow, by the way, is National Candy Corn Day. Some get chills just thinking about it. More than ever in its history, candy corn has needed - no, deserved - a proper defense.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | November 19, 2013
Beloved by all for its packed-to-the-gills karaoke action on weekends and more Jell-O shots that any human fist can shake at, Walt's Inn has been one of the tried and true dive bars of the Canton scene for ages. The very last thing you'd ever expect to see there was an actual cocktail in an actual glass. Until now. Bartender Dawn Green, a Little Italy native and part-time bartender at Walt's, will frequently concoct large-volume creations with cute names to dispense to the masses.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Daniel J. Vargas and Daniel J. Vargas,SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS | November 1, 1998
Time to fess up. Candy corn is one of your guilty pleasures. You love it. Say it - this time with some semblance of sincerity.You're not alone. The concoction of honey, sugar and corn syrup is a Halloween staple. Americans will buy 20 million pounds of the tri-colored, triangular treat this year. So say the number crunchers at the National Confectioners Association."Candy corn sales are kind of a fall thing," said the NCA's Sheila Heath (not to be confused with the candy bar, she added). "There is some red and green candy corn around Christmas time, but it's primarily Halloween."
EXPLORE
By Cathy Drinkwater Better | November 10, 2012
There are a few immutable laws of nature: gravity; E = MC2; and "if something can go wrong, it will. " I'd like to propose another: "If you forget to buy Halloween candy, or don't buy enough, a thousand extra trick-or-treaters - in addition to the ghosts, witches, princesses, Batmans and Kardashians already in your neighborhood - will be bussed in from all over; and every single one of them will stop at your front door with their plastic pumpkin-buckets outstretched....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 14, 2010
Neon colors and novelty shapes are not usually the hallmarks of quality food. So I was surprised last week when a colleague who is a serious foodie brought in a mix of peanuts, plain M&Ms and candy corn. I understood the M&Ms -- along with Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, they're the only things I'm even tempted to steal from my kids' Halloween haul -- but candy corn? Really? "They just feel autumny," said John- John Williams IV, recalling how the tri-colored candies topped the Halloween cupcakes he had as a kid. "It reminds me of being young.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | November 19, 2013
Beloved by all for its packed-to-the-gills karaoke action on weekends and more Jell-O shots that any human fist can shake at, Walt's Inn has been one of the tried and true dive bars of the Canton scene for ages. The very last thing you'd ever expect to see there was an actual cocktail in an actual glass. Until now. Bartender Dawn Green, a Little Italy native and part-time bartender at Walt's, will frequently concoct large-volume creations with cute names to dispense to the masses.
EXPLORE
By Cathy Drinkwater Better | November 10, 2012
There are a few immutable laws of nature: gravity; E = MC2; and "if something can go wrong, it will. " I'd like to propose another: "If you forget to buy Halloween candy, or don't buy enough, a thousand extra trick-or-treaters - in addition to the ghosts, witches, princesses, Batmans and Kardashians already in your neighborhood - will be bussed in from all over; and every single one of them will stop at your front door with their plastic pumpkin-buckets outstretched....
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2002
Are you usually haunted by Halloween candy long after the day has passed? Halloween is the top candy-producing holiday in the country, with sales this year expected to be about $2 billion, according to the National Confectioners Association. The group says more than 9 billion pieces of candy corn will be produced, enough to circle the moon nearly four times. But it doesn't take a culinary ace to recycle leftover Halloween candy into treats for the whole family. Adrian Ashton, chef at Cafe Mileto in Germantown, learned how easy it is to use candy in desserts when he first made his popular Snickers Cheesecake with Caramel Graham-Cracker Crust for a child's birthday.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | October 4, 1995
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- The orange and black crepe paper streamers flap in the chilled night air. The candle inside the jack-o-lantern is guttering down, making the wide grin look mean and sinister. It's as if old Jack sees something that you don't, those triangular eyes shifting this way and that with each spurt of the flame. That skeleton in the community center doorway is only paper, isn't it? It's a trick of the breeze, the way those bones dance and beckon to you. It's as if the skeleton is talking to that ghost hanging in the tree, the one that's supposed to be a sheet, but now -- with the mist rising -- it looks kind of like a spirit walking.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 15, 1993
You don't have to be a naturalist to notice fall's brilliant colors.All over town, maple trees that endure foul air and too much humidity in other months are putting on a grand show.The reds, oranges and gold colors make it seem as if the woods of New England have been transplanted here.That this would be a brilliant fall was evident a few weeks ago when I glanced at one of my favorite bellwether trees.It stands outside an apartment house at 30th and St. Paul streets.That particular tree turns color before any other in Charles Village.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Chew on this: Adults — not children — account for 65 percent of gummi candy consumption in the United States. And that appetite is growing, if Haribo of America Inc.'s sales are any indication. U.S. sales for the Woodlawn-based division of the German candy maker have grown in double digits in each of the past five years, and more than 20 percent in 2011, said Christian Jegen, president of Haribo of America. Known for inventing gummi bears, Haribo began mass-marketing the fruity, chewy candy in the United States in the 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 14, 2010
Neon colors and novelty shapes are not usually the hallmarks of quality food. So I was surprised last week when a colleague who is a serious foodie brought in a mix of peanuts, plain M&Ms and candy corn. I understood the M&Ms -- along with Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, they're the only things I'm even tempted to steal from my kids' Halloween haul -- but candy corn? Really? "They just feel autumny," said John- John Williams IV, recalling how the tri-colored candies topped the Halloween cupcakes he had as a kid. "It reminds me of being young.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | October 29, 2007
"Candy corn is the only candy in the history of America that's never been advertised. And there's a reason. All of the candy corn that was ever made was made in 1911." - Comedian Lewis Black Nice try, but that's wrong. Candy corn happened to have been first mass-produced by the Goelitz Candy Co. in 1898. So, technically, all the candy corn ever made dates back to 1898 and not 1911. Wednesday is Halloween, and the candy corn debate once again has raised its ugly cone head. Tomorrow, by the way, is National Candy Corn Day. Some get chills just thinking about it. More than ever in its history, candy corn has needed - no, deserved - a proper defense.
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2002
Are you usually haunted by Halloween candy long after the day has passed? Halloween is the top candy-producing holiday in the country, with sales this year expected to be about $2 billion, according to the National Confectioners Association. The group says more than 9 billion pieces of candy corn will be produced, enough to circle the moon nearly four times. But it doesn't take a culinary ace to recycle leftover Halloween candy into treats for the whole family. Adrian Ashton, chef at Cafe Mileto in Germantown, learned how easy it is to use candy in desserts when he first made his popular Snickers Cheesecake with Caramel Graham-Cracker Crust for a child's birthday.
FEATURES
By Daniel J. Vargas and Daniel J. Vargas,SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS | November 1, 1998
Time to fess up. Candy corn is one of your guilty pleasures. You love it. Say it - this time with some semblance of sincerity.You're not alone. The concoction of honey, sugar and corn syrup is a Halloween staple. Americans will buy 20 million pounds of the tri-colored, triangular treat this year. So say the number crunchers at the National Confectioners Association."Candy corn sales are kind of a fall thing," said the NCA's Sheila Heath (not to be confused with the candy bar, she added). "There is some red and green candy corn around Christmas time, but it's primarily Halloween."
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | October 4, 1995
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- The orange and black crepe paper streamers flap in the chilled night air. The candle inside the jack-o-lantern is guttering down, making the wide grin look mean and sinister. It's as if old Jack sees something that you don't, those triangular eyes shifting this way and that with each spurt of the flame. That skeleton in the community center doorway is only paper, isn't it? It's a trick of the breeze, the way those bones dance and beckon to you. It's as if the skeleton is talking to that ghost hanging in the tree, the one that's supposed to be a sheet, but now -- with the mist rising -- it looks kind of like a spirit walking.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Chew on this: Adults — not children — account for 65 percent of gummi candy consumption in the United States. And that appetite is growing, if Haribo of America Inc.'s sales are any indication. U.S. sales for the Woodlawn-based division of the German candy maker have grown in double digits in each of the past five years, and more than 20 percent in 2011, said Christian Jegen, president of Haribo of America. Known for inventing gummi bears, Haribo began mass-marketing the fruity, chewy candy in the United States in the 1980s.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | October 21, 1998
From your pumpkin, toasty little snacksAs you carve your jack-o'-lantern, take a few minutes to separate the pumpkin seeds from the strings. Coat the seeds lightly with a little vegetable oil and spread on a coookie sheet. Dry in a 225-degree oven for about 1 1/2 hours. Season with salt, freshly ground pepper or Mexican seasoning and toast in a toaster oven, stirring once, or bake at 350 degrees in the oven until lightly toasted.A Halloween treat so easy, it's scaryIf you like to make your own Halloween treats, here's one that's easy enough for kids to do: Dip sourdough pretzels in melted white chocolate, place them on waxed paper and decorate with candy corn or colored sprinkles.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 15, 1993
You don't have to be a naturalist to notice fall's brilliant colors.All over town, maple trees that endure foul air and too much humidity in other months are putting on a grand show.The reds, oranges and gold colors make it seem as if the woods of New England have been transplanted here.That this would be a brilliant fall was evident a few weeks ago when I glanced at one of my favorite bellwether trees.It stands outside an apartment house at 30th and St. Paul streets.That particular tree turns color before any other in Charles Village.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.