Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCandy Canes
IN THE NEWS

Candy Canes

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 14, 1994
Life is full of contradictions and so is our Christmas tree.Every year my family puts decorations on the tree that look good enough to eat. Then we spend the early days of the holiday season warning each other "Don't Eat the Tree!"We wrap ropes of popcorn around our tree. The ropes make the tree look fuller. They give the tree symmetry. They work so well covering up bare spots that I am considering making a headband out of popcorn and making it a regular part of my new "look."Stringing the popped corn together with a needle and thread is tedious work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 13, 2013
On Saturday, Dec. 14, the Friends of Anne Arundel County Trails and Santa Claus will team up to collect nonperishable food items for the Anne Arundel County Food Bank and to help with the annual membership drive to support county trails. Starting in Arnold, Santa will be riding a tractor-pulled sleigh along the length of the B&A Trail. Volunteers will collect food items and hand out candy canes between stops. Stops and estimated times are as follows: 10:30 a.m. at the Arnold Station 11:15 a.m. at Jones Station 11:45 a.m. at Hatton Register 12:15 p.m. at Robinson Road 12:45 p.m. at Earleigh Heights 1:45 p.m. at Jumpers Shopping Center 2:15 p.m. at Harundale Shopping Center 3 p.m. at Sawmill Creek Park.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
Donna L. Sanderson of Salem, Ore., remembers a peppermint dessert that had crushed peppermint, whipped cream, miniature marshmallows and graham crackers and was served in small squares. She jokes that she is no cook but wants that recipe. LaVonne G. Hill of Walkersville responded. She wrote, "I have your recipe. It is from a cookbook entitled Our Favorite Desserts: Favorites From Home Economics Teachers, published 1967. I grew up in North Dakota where graham-cracker refrigerator desserts are very common.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
The neon sign flashing "Casino" seems out of sync with the rest of the idyllic Christmas village on display at the Ellicott City Fire Station, reminding onlookers of Pottersville, the racy city that would have replaced homey Bedford Falls if George Bailey hadn't been born in "It's a Wonderful Life. " Down the hill, amid tidy drifts of fake snow, a worker puts the finishing touches on a billboard for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad that entices riders with the slogan "Sleep like a Kitten," written in old-timey cursive.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 30, 2003
Harford's three municipalities will step into the holiday spirit this weekend with parades and tree lightings. Standard fare for each event includes visits with Santa Claus and free hot chocolate, candy canes and cookies. And the one-a-day parade schedule will allow avid fans to watch all three. On Friday night, Havre de Grace's first-Friday-of-the-month activities, which include carriage rides and extended shopping hours, will be punctuated by the Christmas parade, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Karen Green of the county's Parks and Recreation Department said the town's annual event is unique because families are invited to march in the parade.
NEWS
December 13, 2013
On Saturday, Dec. 14, the Friends of Anne Arundel County Trails and Santa Claus will team up to collect nonperishable food items for the Anne Arundel County Food Bank and to help with the annual membership drive to support county trails. Starting in Arnold, Santa will be riding a tractor-pulled sleigh along the length of the B&A Trail. Volunteers will collect food items and hand out candy canes between stops. Stops and estimated times are as follows: 10:30 a.m. at the Arnold Station 11:15 a.m. at Jones Station 11:45 a.m. at Hatton Register 12:15 p.m. at Robinson Road 12:45 p.m. at Earleigh Heights 1:45 p.m. at Jumpers Shopping Center 2:15 p.m. at Harundale Shopping Center 3 p.m. at Sawmill Creek Park.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | November 18, 2004
Baltimore will get a welcome addition to this year's slate of holiday celebrations with the world premiere of a new Nutcracker at the Hippodrome. This Nutcracker, which will draw on American history, was choreographed by Septime Webre, artistic director of the Washington Ballet. It will be at the Hippodrome for seven performances Dec. 2-5. Webre's version will be set in a Washington mansion in 1882. In Clara's dream, the Nutcracker will resemble George Washington, and the Rat King may call to mind England's King George III. The great battle between the rats and the toys, of course, will feature Redcoats and the ragtag Continental Army.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | December 18, 1993
Around the house* Prevent stains on tablecloths and napkins. Spray linens with fabric protector at least one day before using. Be sure to test for colorfastness in an inconspicuous spot.* Wrap rubber bands or string around the base of candles that will not fit into holders. Or, try slipping a small, fluted candy wrapper on the end of candle for a snug fit.* Dry hand-washed sweaters easily. Place a child's safety gate over bathtub and lay the garment flat to dry.* Group houseplants together in a red basket for a quick holiday touch.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006
SUN NEW YEAR-- Bring in 2007 with a night to remember with the family at Night 365. It's a night to see permanent exhibits and IMAX theater presentations at the Maryland Science Center, Baltimore's Inner Harbor along Pratt Street. $35 for general admission; $30 for members; children younger than 3 admitted free. 7 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Call 410-685-2370. MON AN ONGOING TRADITION-- The annual Salute to Vienna features the Strauss Symphony of America with conductor Klaus Arp in a show that highlights dances such as the waltz and polka by Johann Strauss Jr. $33-$95.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | December 19, 2007
It's holiday crunch time. Time to dig out those last ornaments. Time to bake cookies for Santa. Why not save a little time, and make ornaments out of cookies? Baltimore International College senior associate chef instructor Faith Kling showed us how to make simple, edible ornaments from a standard sugar-cookie dough. They're baked much like regular cookies (in fact, you can bake some to eat and some to use for decoration in the same batch). Kling uses crushed Jolly Ranchers to make a stained-glass effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 14, 2010
Neon colors and novelty shapes are not usually the hallmarks of quality food. So I was surprised last week when a colleague who is a serious foodie brought in a mix of peanuts, plain M&Ms and candy corn. I understood the M&Ms -- along with Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, they're the only things I'm even tempted to steal from my kids' Halloween haul -- but candy corn? Really? "They just feel autumny," said John- John Williams IV, recalling how the tri-colored candies topped the Halloween cupcakes he had as a kid. "It reminds me of being young.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | December 19, 2007
It's holiday crunch time. Time to dig out those last ornaments. Time to bake cookies for Santa. Why not save a little time, and make ornaments out of cookies? Baltimore International College senior associate chef instructor Faith Kling showed us how to make simple, edible ornaments from a standard sugar-cookie dough. They're baked much like regular cookies (in fact, you can bake some to eat and some to use for decoration in the same batch). Kling uses crushed Jolly Ranchers to make a stained-glass effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006
SUN NEW YEAR-- Bring in 2007 with a night to remember with the family at Night 365. It's a night to see permanent exhibits and IMAX theater presentations at the Maryland Science Center, Baltimore's Inner Harbor along Pratt Street. $35 for general admission; $30 for members; children younger than 3 admitted free. 7 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Call 410-685-2370. MON AN ONGOING TRADITION-- The annual Salute to Vienna features the Strauss Symphony of America with conductor Klaus Arp in a show that highlights dances such as the waltz and polka by Johann Strauss Jr. $33-$95.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | November 14, 2005
It was almost as warm as springtime yesterday, but Jeanette Middlesworth was already decking her bathroom with a snowman shower curtain and matching soap dispensers. In front of her rowhouse in Hampden, she raised a 6-foot plastic snow globe, a hammered-tin baby Jesus, a gingerbread house, two families of life-size inflatable snowmen and a garden of candy canes. Six weeks before Christmas - and well before Thanksgiving - the 50-year-old office worker and her neighbors were sweating like Santa's elves to build a wonderland of over-the-top holiday lighting displays that has made their street in Baltimore famous for its annual "Miracle on 34th Street."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | November 18, 2004
Baltimore will get a welcome addition to this year's slate of holiday celebrations with the world premiere of a new Nutcracker at the Hippodrome. This Nutcracker, which will draw on American history, was choreographed by Septime Webre, artistic director of the Washington Ballet. It will be at the Hippodrome for seven performances Dec. 2-5. Webre's version will be set in a Washington mansion in 1882. In Clara's dream, the Nutcracker will resemble George Washington, and the Rat King may call to mind England's King George III. The great battle between the rats and the toys, of course, will feature Redcoats and the ragtag Continental Army.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
Donna L. Sanderson of Salem, Ore., remembers a peppermint dessert that had crushed peppermint, whipped cream, miniature marshmallows and graham crackers and was served in small squares. She jokes that she is no cook but wants that recipe. LaVonne G. Hill of Walkersville responded. She wrote, "I have your recipe. It is from a cookbook entitled Our Favorite Desserts: Favorites From Home Economics Teachers, published 1967. I grew up in North Dakota where graham-cracker refrigerator desserts are very common.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | December 21, 1992
During the past 25 years, thousands of motorists have idled in front of Del and Mary Delano's rancher in Carney, ogling their sumptuous Christmas spread: Nativity scenes, toy soldiers, elves, Santas, reindeer and candy canes.The Delanos present one of Baltimore County's most beloved lawn productions, an ever-expanding Christmas tableau that has claimed yard, roof, mobile home -- and has inspired the next-door flamboyance of the properties belonging to their children Randy and Toni Delano and Denny and Mary Delano Bayer.
NEWS
By Francine Halvorsen and Francine Halvorsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 2003
One of the quickest ways to become a child again at this time of year is to take a bite of a mint candy cane. But the pleasure of mint isn't found only in red and white sticks of candy. The Starbucks in Mount Washington sells hundreds of cups of Peppermint Hot Chocolate and Peppermint Mocha a week. "People tell us that they miss it when we discontinue it until next season," store manager Dawn Drater says. At Naron's, Baltimore candy maker since 1905, sales manager Murph Scherr says: "Our mint truffles are one of the holiday's best sellers and our after-dinner mints are very popular.
NEWS
By Rachel Osterman and Rachel Osterman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 26, 2003
BRYAN, Ohio - Here in what could be called the candy cane capital of the world, residents like to boast that food doesn't get more American than this old-fashioned, red-and-white striped confection. That's because more than 90 percent of those peppermint canes are consumed within the United States. And, it used to be, they were nearly all made domestically as well. No more. In the past three years, nearly half of all U.S. candy cane production has shifted to Mexico, industry experts say. That's true of the candy cane maker based in this northwest Ohio town, Spangler Candy Co., which recently opened a plant in Juarez that generates half of Spangler's striped treats.
NEWS
By Francine Halvorsen and Francine Halvorsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 2003
One of the quickest ways to become a child again at this time of year is to take a bite of a mint candy cane. But the pleasure of mint isn't found only in red and white sticks of candy. The Starbucks in Mount Washington sells hundreds of cups of Peppermint Hot Chocolate and Peppermint Mocha a week. "People tell us that they miss it when we discontinue it until next season," store manager Dawn Drater says. At Naron's, Baltimore candy maker since 1905, sales manager Murph Scherr says: "Our mint truffles are one of the holiday's best sellers and our after-dinner mints are very popular.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.