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NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 25, 2003
For quick energy, is an expensive energy bar really that much better than a candy bar? There's nothing magic about an energy bar. Energy comes from calories, so if your energy bar has the same number of calories as a candy bar (most do), it will provide the same amount of fuel for your body. The key is to read the labels, says Sandra DeLong, a registered dietician at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown. While energy bars are usually high in vitamins and minerals, I've heard nutritionists compare them to candy bars with a vitamin pill stuck inside.
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NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | March 2, 2010
To his neighbors in Columbia, Soo Wan Hong was the man who mowed their lawns, shoveled their driveways, gave their children giant candy bars on Halloween and helped neighborhood kids build forts with the bamboo he grew in his backyard. To others in the Owen Brown community, he was the fellow who sat serenely on a bench near Lake Elkhorn with his beloved Shih Tzus, smiling at passersby, or walked briskly with his dogs around the lake, waving to those he encountered. With his limited English, the Korean immigrant spoke little of his troubles.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2002
Sue Schatz of Abingdon requested a Milky Way Cake recipe, and Carol Katsampis of Ellicott City replied with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Milky Way Cake Serves 16 to 20 six 2.10-ounce or 13 fun-size Milky Way candy bars 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, divided use 2 cups sugar 4 eggs 2 1/2 cups flour 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup buttermilk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1/2 to 1 cup pecans, chopped (optional) frosting (see recipe) Melt candy bars and 1/2 cup butter in the top of a double boiler over simmering water.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green | December 25, 2009
W hen my sister, Betsy, and I were in the first and second grade, our mother took up skiing. This was an odd pastime for someone in Illinois to adopt, but she was quite passionate for a time about her newfound pursuit. And as fate would have it, our aunt, uncle and cousins were living in Salt Lake City, and mom decided we should visit them for Christmas so that she could teach us how to ski, too. There was just one minor hurdle: How to get the Christmas presents to Aunt Carolyn's house without two inquisitive young kids catching on?
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
Spring training is just getting under way, but Cal Ripken Jr. was batting 1.000 yesterday at Roland Park Country School in Baltimore. Eight out of eight young women who sampled the new Cal Bar candy bar, named for the popular Orioles' shortstop, gave it a thumbs up."It's good," said Julia Garrett, an eighth-grader, at an informal taste test."Usually I don't like peanuts in candy bars," said Carolyn Holliday, an 11th-grader, "but I like the peanuts in this, they taste good with the caramel."
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1997
The Snickers bar always comes before the match. The Three Musketeers bar is saved for after.In between, South Carroll wrestler Mike Muller is in a world of his own.He finds an isolated corner, focusing, head down. He gets up and paces -- back and forth, behind the Cavaliers' chairs.On one occasion, he unknowingly walks in front, head down, obscuring the view of coach Pete Olson with a match taking place."Get outta here, Mike," Olson yells, half jokingly.Back to the corner where he has a brief chat with teammate Jason Hamper.
NEWS
February 5, 1993
Fire destroys home on Hillside Drive; residents unhurtA two-alarm fire last night in the 1200 block of Hillside Drive destroyed the two-story waterfront home of three men and caused an estimated $165,000 damage.No injuries were reported.Fire Department spokesman Capt. Gary Sheckells said no one was home when the fire broke out in a first-floor apartment at around 10:20 p.m., about 30 minutes after the last of three tenants had left the house.A second-floor apartment was unoccupied.Within minutes, the fire enveloped the dwelling, causing the second alarm to be sounded at 10:31 p.m.Nearly 40 firefighters from several fire stations brought the fire under control in less than an hour.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson | May 5, 1996
Rasheeda Wilson, 16, is no stranger to sacrifice. Just ask her about the cold Saturday nights she spent selling candy bars instead of going out with her friends.But none of those friends was accepted to the Sea Education Association's Science at SEA summer program at Woods Hole, Mass. That's where Rasheeda is headed -- if she can raise the money.The program accepted her and gave her a scholarship covering about half the cost. The rest is up to her, which is where the candy bars come in."The first day, we didn't sell half a box," she says.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Contributing Writer | October 13, 1993
You'll know this white-on-white dessert is something special when you mix in melted white candy bars. (Be sure to save a little candy to top the billowy whipped cream frosting.) Another elegant touch is rippling on the sides, made with a cake comb. To do it yourself, you'll need a cake comb from a cake decorating supply shop. Hold the comb against the sides of the cake and gently pull it around the entire cake (a lazy Susan makes this even easier).Candy bar raspberry torteMakes 12 servings3 2.2-ounce creamy white candy bars with almonds1/2 cup water2 1/4 cups sifted cake flour2 teaspoons baking powder1/4 teaspoon baking soda1 cup margarine or butter1 1/2 cups sugar4 egg yolks1 cup buttermilk4 egg whites1/4 cup sugar10- or 12-ounce jar seedless raspberry jam1 recipe whipped cream frostingReserve half of one candy bar for garnish.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green | December 25, 2009
When my sister, Betsy, and I were in the first and second grade, our mother took up skiing. This was an odd pastime for someone in Illinois to adopt, but she was quite passionate for a time about her newfound pursuit. And as fate would have it, our aunt, uncle and cousins were living in Salt Lake City, and mom decided we should visit them for Christmas so that she could teach us how to ski, too. There was just one minor hurdle: How to get the Christmas presents to Aunt Carolyn's house without two inquisitive young kids catching on?
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,jennifer.mcmenamin@baltsun.com | September 9, 2008
Elizabeth Walters grew up with many families. A foster child who was adopted at the age of 10, she split her time between her birth family and her adoptive family. Later, girlfriends at Catholic High School and co-workers and patrons at the neighborhood bar where she was a waitress also became like family to her. It was her appreciation for the concept of family that prompted Elizabeth Walters to confront the married man with whom she was expecting a baby about what role he'd play in the little girl's life, friends and relatives said.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 21, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Before last night's game, the season's most popular Halloween costume seemed pretty clear. After all, ever since Chris Turner, that lanky California kid with the cottonball curls, took over as Maryland quarterback three weeks ago, sales of blond afro wigs in College Park have increased a hundredfold. But after last night's 18-17 nail-biting loss to Virginia, the Turner costume has been supplanted on the season's must-have list. The new costume of choice is a bit more elaborate, but it'll surely bring more candy.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | January 2, 2007
The PTA survey sent to Hampstead's Spring Garden Elementary School parents put the ball in their court. What did they prefer for a fundraiser: Selling something? Doing an activity? Or flat-out donating money? The majority of those who responded, said Rhayne Evans, the school's PTA president, favored an activity. And so the school's multicultural extravaganza, called "Around the World in 5 Days," was born last fall. Armed with monetary pledges for their journey, students spent a week learning about world cultures and mastering the art of eating Cheerios with chopsticks.
NEWS
By TEAGUE LYONS | March 19, 2006
Feeling insignificant? Here's the remedy: Create an Internet-based encyclopedia entry about yourself. All you need do is log on to www.wikipedia.org and write your life's accomplishments. Once you're finished, it will be available instantly to Internet browsers everywhere. Wikipedia isn't some online sideshow, either. It is used by tens of millions of people every week - more than CNN.com. Wikipedia is an interactive online encyclopedia that anyone can work with; you can create your own entries and edit existing ones.
NEWS
By Claire Wang and Claire Wang,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2005
Few can resist the inviting smell of a warm pan of brownies fresh from the oven. In her book, Brownie Mix Bliss (Cumberland House, 2005, $16.95), author Camilla Saulsbury opens up a world of confectionary possibilities, giving chocolate lovers almost 200 reasons to indulge. The book is divided into sections that include recipes for brownies and other traditional desserts like cookies, dessert bars and assorted brownie desserts - all of them starting with a plain box of brownie mix. There is also a section on frostings and glazes and a brief glossary that covers basic baking terminology.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Staff | April 24, 2005
There's a book on noises you can make with your mouth. There's a book on real-life lessons to be gleaned from reality TV, on instances of workplace stupidity, on how to transform small figurine heads of former presidents into coat hangers and table lamps. There's also The Book of Bunny Suicides, which illustrates the many ways a rabbit could kill itself. And for those of you who have always yearned to see the story of Moses told exclusively with Lego building blocks, your prayers have been answered.
NEWS
By RODNEY D. SMITH | September 27, 1994
Piedmont, California. -- Today's public high schools are graduating well-trained consumers instead of critical thinkers. As a teacher, I am alarmed to see how making money off young people has replaced educating them. My students spend more time exercising their wallets than their minds.Proof is in the increasing amount of class time that is devoted to fund-raising. Members of athletic teams, choirs and yearbook staffs sell T-shirts, candy bars and beefsticks throughout the school day.Every few weeks, I stop teaching for the delivery of flowergrams: flowers sold for $1 and personally delivered with a message to students during class.
NEWS
June 23, 1993
CRUISING through our favorite discount warehouse the other weekend, we spotted a book we couldn't resist. We're happy to report that we bought "The Tightwad Gazette" for one-third the list price. The author would approve. After all, Amy Dacyczyn -- it's pronounced "decision," she says, "as in, 'I made a decision to marry a guy of Ukrainian ancestry.' " -- doesn't call herself "the Frugal Zealot" for nothing.As you might expect, the book is chock full of ideas for saving money, but the more interesting aspect is the philosophy behind the book and the monthly newsletter from which it was compiled.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
What's in a Clark bar besides peanuts, chocolate, corn syrup? More to the point, what's in a Clark bar's name? The answer is probably a lot more than presidential hopeful Wesley Clark may have bargained for. The candy bar, now manufactured at the New England Confectionery Co. (Necco), has become Clark's bite-sized calling card. Perhaps so would-be voters will think sweetly of him, "We usually give them out with a little blurb about General Clark," says Dan Wachtell, a 24-year-old campaign staff member in New Hampshire, where Clark's first test takes place today.
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