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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Maryland voters can expect to see an escalating barrage of television ads before the June 24 primary for governor, a blitz that will be fueled by the nearly $9 million the contenders have in the bank. Most of that money will be spent on the Democratic contest. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown leads with about $4 million on hand, but Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has $3 million - enough to pay for a sustained presence on the air. And Del. Heather R. Mizeur, with nearly $1 million, says she'll be on TV as well.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
In TV terms, there were two winners and one clear loser in Tuesday's night gubernatorial debate on WBFF-TV. The winners: State Delegate Heather Mizeur and the TV station itself. The loser: Lt. Governor Anthony Brown, who declined to participate in Baltimore's only TV debate and was represented by an empty podium between his two opponents, Mizeur and Attorney General Doug Gansler. Fox 45 wins for its skilled use of TV imagery. The empty podium with Brown's name on the front was a perfect symbol for a candidate who looks as if he refuses to be held accountable to the people he wants to serve, of a candidate who will decide based on the terms of his political goals, not the citizens' need for information before going to the polls, how engaged he is going -- or not going -- to be with the voters.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Democrat Douglas F. Gansler's running mate came out swinging at front-runner Anthony G. Brown on health care Tuesday as the three Democratic candidates for lieutenant governor met in their only scheduled television debate. Del. Jolene Ivey of Prince George's County, who is running with Gansler, slammed Brown as a "failed leader" of Maryland's implementation of the federal Affordable Care Act. She rejected the arguments of Brown's running mate, Ken Ulman, that the state exceeded its enrollment goals despite the failure of its health exchange web site.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
When Democrat Douglas F. Gansler stopped by a Baltimore sports bar recently, the ex-convict behind the bar struck up a conversation. It's a tough road, the worker told Gansler, to get any job. "I'm trying to turn my life around," he said. "I've got a newborn son. " Gansler nodded emphatically, and dove into the wonky details of a seemingly unconventional plank in a former prosecutor's platform for governor. Gansler, like all the Democrats vying for the state's top political job, has a detailed plan to ensure ex-offenders do not go back to prison.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
The type of campaign account that Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is using to bolster candidates he favors is used widely in Maryland politics, but critics say it lacks transparency. Kamenetz transferred more than $100,000 of his campaign funds last year to A Better Baltimore County, a slate fund that will be able to transfer unlimited amounts of money to other slate members in this year's elections. Jennifer Bevan-Dangel, executive director of the watchdog group Common Cause Maryland, says slates in Maryland "tend to have a lot more ability to move money around" than those in other states.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
For the third election in a row, a Baltimore County executive has the potential to play kingmaker in elections for other local offices, thanks both to what has been one of the most gaping loopholes in campaign finance law and the inability of the Republican Party to put up a credible candidate in what was once the key jurisdiction in its efforts at state-wide competitiveness. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz has amassed at least $123,000 in an election slate he controls, all of which he can transfer to other slate members, of which there is presently only one: his favored candidate in a contested County Council primary.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
The centrist shift of the Republican Party, first observed last fall with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's landslide re-election, continued this week with GOP establishment candidates defeating tea party challengers in primary races. The most visible was Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's trouncing of a conservative opponent who was once running ahead of him in polls. Mr. McConnell is nobody's moderate, but he's no tea party absolutist either. What he represents — and what voters in Kentucky clearly endorsed — is an establishment Republican, the kind who believes in lower taxes and smaller government but not in shutting down the federal government or other forms of self-destructive behavior in the cause of extremism.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The two opponents of Del. Jon S. Cardin in his race for the Democratic nomination for attorney general chastised him during a debate Monday night for skipping almost 75 percent of his committee votes this year. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County and Del. Aisha Braveboy of Prince George's County said there was no excuse for missing so many voting sessions, where decisions are made on which bills die and which advance to a floor vote. "If you don't show up in Annapolis, if you don't vote, you don't count," Frosh said during the first debate of the attorney general's race, held at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The next televised debate in the governor's race likely will feature two candidates and an empty lectern. Baltimore Fox affiliate WBFF-TV announced "finalized" debate plans Monday that include only two of the top three Democrats in the race: Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur. The pair are scheduled to face off next Tuesday without the candidate leading the polls, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who has declined to participate. Brown's campaign consistently has told debate organizers the lieutenant governor has no plans to attend, but the Sinclair-owned Fox affiliate plans to leave an empty lectern on the stage in his place.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Maryland's three Democratic candidates for attorney general are likely to debate how to enforce environmental laws, fight high-tech crime and crack down on home foreclosures at their first debate Monday night in a race that will likely determine who will be the state's top lawyer. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh, Del. Jon S. Cardin and Del. Aisha Braveboy are seeking the Democratic nomination in a race that party's nominee has won in every election for almost a century. The winner of this year's June 24 primary will face Jeffrey N. Pritzker, a Towson lawyer who would be the first Republican elected to the office since 1919, and Leo Wayne Dymowski, a Libertarian.
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