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Candidates For Governor

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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
Marylanders get a chance next year to see if they can improve the political game by paying for it.Barring another delay, about $2.7 million will be available to help finance races for governor in the primary and general election.Forces for good government hope public financing will shift power away from $1,000-givers by providing public dollars to candidates if they accept spending limits."The current system is corrupting because it encourages even well-intentioned people to go where the money is," says Phil Andrews, executive director of Common Cause of Maryland.
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NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | October 3, 2014
The presidential election of 2012 and Maryland's gubernatorial election of 2014 have much in common rhetorically in terms of their approaches to issues and spin, the two key components of political persuasion. The 2012 presidential election pitted a likable African-American Democratic incumbent president against a white, older Republican who had been out of politics for years. The 2014 Maryland gubernatorial race features a likable incumbent African-American Democratic lieutenant governor against a white, older Republican who has been out of politics for years.
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TOPIC
October 27, 2002
To accommodate a fuller report on the two candidates for governor in next week's election, The Week That Was review is omitted this Sunday.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Candidates for Maryland governor unleashed dueling attack ads Monday, heightening a negative contest that has been marked by name-calling and hostility. Republican Larry Hogan's ad plays off an attack Democrat Anthony G. Brown has already lobbed against him: the opponent would take the state "backwards. " Hogan's 40-second ad highlights the pocketbook issues that he has made the centerpiece of his campaign and charged that the O'Malley-Brown administration was responsible for the economic recession.
NEWS
July 16, 1998
An article in yesterday's Maryland section omitted the name of one of the Democratic candidates for governor, Lawrence Freeman.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/16/98
NEWS
November 1, 2002
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun about Democratic candidates courting sportsmen quoted Rich Novotny, executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's Association, at a rally for gubernatorial candidate Kathleen Kennedy Townsend. Novotny and MSSA president Bruno Vasta were at the Cecil County event as individuals, not in their official capacity. The association does not endorse candidates for governor, as was explained in another article this week.
NEWS
July 24, 1994
When voters approved a constitutional amendment in 1972 resurrecting the office of lieutenant governor, they didn't realize it contained a serious flaw. Now that flaw is glaringly obvious. And it needs fixing.The selection process is all wrong. Candidates for governor are forced to select running mates so early in the campaign that the best politicians usually reject these partnership offers. So the gubernatorial hopefuls turn to their second-best lists of retiring lawmakers, lesser-known local officials and hardly-known non-office holders.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
THEY'RE everywhere! You know it's campaign season when the candidates for governor are splayed so broadly across the local landscape it resembles a military invasion.There's Parris N. Glendening staging multiple media events to publicize the formal kickoff of his re-election bid.There's Eileen M. Rehrmann announcing her running mate, veteran Montgomery County politician-businessman Sidney Kramer.There's Republican front-runner Ellen R. Sauerbrey playing host to New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani at a skybox fund-raiser at Camden Yards, then announcing her surprise choice for lieutenant governor, moderate Richard D. Bennett, a former U.S. attorney for Maryland.
NEWS
June 27, 1994
TCWith a week remaining before the July 5 filing deadline, the seven candidates for governor are scrambling to find running mates and establish an image that will capture voters' attention.House Minority Leader Ellen Sauerbrey of Baltimore County beat everyone to the punch when she early on selected former Howard County police chief Paul H. Rappaport as her lieutentant governor. She wanted a strong law-and-order message to convey to voters.Rep. Helen Bentley of Baltimore County wanted to present voters with a ticket that had a balanced regional image as well as a balanced ideological record.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- Seven candidates for governor told Maryland municipal officials exactly what they wanted to hear yesterday: that they would stop state government from slapping requirements on local governments without sending the money to pay for them.All of the candidates answering questions at a forum at the Maryland Municipal League summer conference here said they would prohibit such "mandates" without accompanying funds.HTC Two -- Democrat Parris N. Glendening and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey -- went even further, saying they would support an amendment to the state Constitution prohibiting unfunded mandates.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
When you're a Libertarian candidate in Maryland, garnering more than 1 percent of the vote on Election Day counts as a win. But for Shawn Quinn, candidate for governor, nothing short of toppling both the major-party candidates will feel like victory. "People think I'm nuts," Quinn said last week. "But I want to be the next governor of Maryland. " The Libertarian Party, founded in 1971, has never won more than a full percentage point of Maryland voters in statewide races. Quinn is undeterred.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Voters will head to the polls Tuesday to resolve one of the costliest primary fights in Maryland history and nominate scores more politicians for November's general election. With experts forecasting low turnout, candidates were out in force trying Monday to lure voters - long accustomed to September primaries - to cast a ballot in Maryland's first June primary since the Eisenhower administration. "It's really a turnout question in an election like this," said Barbara A. Hoffman, a former state senator and longtime political observer.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn | June 13, 2014
Among the participants in this year's Baltimore Pride Parade will be Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, gubernatorial candidate Heather Mizeur and Ken Ulman , who is gubernatorial candidate Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's running mate. The politicians say they have embraced the local LGBT community, with Rawlings-Blake performing the first gay marriage in Baltimore City in 2013 and conducting the first mass gay wedding in Druid Hill Park later that year. Mizeur would be the first female and openly gay governor in Maryland if elected.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Third in a series of profiles of candidates for governor. In 1991, Ron George opened a jewelry store on Main Street in Annapolis within sight of the State House dome, placing his name in oversized gold lettering on the 19th-century storefront. It turned out to be a convenient location for the conservative Republican state legislator now running for governor. For George, Main Street is not merely an address, it's a persona. Hardly a campaign appearance goes by without a reference to his connection to "Main Street" roots and values.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
OCEAN CITY — Gubernatorial candidates of both parties promised city and town officials that they would restore local road repair money cut from the state budget by the O'Malley administration. Appearing at the annual convention of the Maryland Municipal League two weeks before the June 24 primary, Democrat Anthony G. Brown and four Republican candidates pledged full restoration of the transportation spending known as "highway user revenue. " That spending was cut back as much as 95 percent by Gov. Martin O'Malley during the recession as the governor chose to shield other spending priorities from deep cuts.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
When the Rev. Darlingston Johnson tried to buy 120 acres in Montgomery County to accommodate his new church a decade ago, he quickly learned that local politicians were less devoted to practicing Christian - style kindness than he was. He needed a few zoning signatures. Officials barely gave him the time of day. The reason, he says: His membership included lots of African immigrants, a group he says has never had a seat at the table of power. "While the number of African immigrants in the U.S. is large, our community lacks the strong influence with political and corporate leaders we deserve," he says.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | May 12, 1994
THERE'S a $3 million jackpot in Maryland's treasury waiting to be tapped, but only candidates for governor need apply.For the first time since the tax checkoff for public financing of political campaigns was authorized in the post-Watergate reform frenzy, the state will hand out money to gubernatorial candidates and their running mates for lieutenant governor who agree to legally imposed spending limits.The money has been held in escrow, gathering interest for more than 20 years because succeeding General Assemblys couldn't agree on how to allocate the funds.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
The increasing visibility of violent, random crime "has really frightened citizens," making it the No. 1 issue in this year's gubernatorial race, state Sen. Mary H. Boergers told the state's top law enforcement officers yesterday in Glen Burnie.Mrs. Boergers of Montgomery County was one of three Democratic gubernatorial candidates to appear at the Maryland Chiefs of Police Association's quarterly meeting at Michael's Eighth Avenue to outline their platforms on crime.The others were state Sen. American Joe Miedusiewski of Baltimore and Lt. Gov. Melvin A. "Mickey" Steinberg.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
In their only scheduled debate on Baltimore television, the four Republican candidates for governor depicted Maryland as overtaxed and overspent under a Democratic administration, creating a climate in which businesses are fleeing to neighboring states. In the debate, taped Monday afternoon for broadcast Friday, David R. Craig, Ron George, Larry Hogan and Charles Lollar offered a grim assessment of the state's economic outlook as the second and final term of Gov. Martin O'Malley comes to an end. "Businesses are leaving in droves - to go to Virginia, to Delaware, to West Virginia, to other states," said Hogan, 58, a former Ehrlich administration official, who said the state's "onerous" tax policy is to blame.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | June 2, 2014
The three Democratic candidates for governor will all meet for their second televised debate Monday night on Maryland Public Television and WBAL-TV, giving voters their final opportunity to see them confront each other on television. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur will go on at 7 p.m. in a debate hosted by MPT's Jeff Salkin. The three met last month in a televised debate at the University of Maryland College Park in an exchange that included lively confrontations between Brown and Gansler while Mizeur largely stayed above the fray.
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