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Candida

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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 23, 2006
In a telling speech near the end of George Bernard Shaw's Candida, the title character describes herself as her husband's wife, mother and sisters -- all in one. Deborah Hazlett handily portrays a woman capable of this multiplicity of roles in Everyman Theatre's season-ending production. Shaw, personally, was no stranger to romantic triangles, and that is the setup he presented in this fin-de-siecle comedy. A young poet -- the latest "discovery" of a happily married clergyman -- falls in love with the minister's wife, Candida.
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2009
The fact that George Bernard Shaw's Candida was written in 1894 and set in London should not suggest any lack of relevance to 21st-century audiences. Shaw's sparkling wit is couched in graceful language to espouse equality of classes and sexes. Shaw is quoted as saying, "My way of joking is to tell the truth; it's the funniest joke in the world." Candida - staged by Bay Theatre through May 30 - is the story of the wife of the Rev. James Morell of East London. From the moment audience members enter Bay Theatre's intimate space, they are ensconced in a Victorian drawing room, complete with a working fireplace.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
STAGE GEORGE Bernard Shaw's ''Candida'' without care, and you run the risk of losing your audience. Do it as well as Center Stage is doing it, and you're likely to please everybody.Do the play carelessly, and the minister will end up a blundering bore. Do his wife carelessly, and she may wind up being unsympathetic, even irritating. Do Marchbanks off key, and he can be impossible.At Center Stage, all the leading players are on key. Richard Poe, as Rev. Morell, is righteous without being pompous.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 23, 2006
In a telling speech near the end of George Bernard Shaw's Candida, the title character describes herself as her husband's wife, mother and sisters -- all in one. Deborah Hazlett handily portrays a woman capable of this multiplicity of roles in Everyman Theatre's season-ending production. Shaw, personally, was no stranger to romantic triangles, and that is the setup he presented in this fin-de-siecle comedy. A young poet -- the latest "discovery" of a happily married clergyman -- falls in love with the minister's wife, Candida.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 10, 1991
George Bernard Shaw categorized his 1894 play "Candida" as one of his "plays pleasant," and the production that opened at Center Stage last night is exceedingly pleasant indeed.Staged by associate artistic director Rick Davis, in his Center Stage directorial debut, this compactly composed account of a love triangle is presented with near-perfect casting and swift pacing that accentuates the comic nuances in Shaw's pyrotechnic prose.The points of the play's romantic triangle consist of: The Rev. Morell, a Christian socialist minister played by Richard Poe as a self-satisfied clergyman who can't speak a simple declarative sentence without making itsound like a sermon; his wife, the lovely and efficient Candida, played by Joyce O'Connor as a clever flirt capable of bending any man's will to her own, and Benjamin White as the lovesick poet, Marchbanks, a social misfit whose infatuation with Candida threatens to turn the Morell household upside down.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2009
The fact that George Bernard Shaw's Candida was written in 1894 and set in London should not suggest any lack of relevance to 21st-century audiences. Shaw's sparkling wit is couched in graceful language to espouse equality of classes and sexes. Shaw is quoted as saying, "My way of joking is to tell the truth; it's the funniest joke in the world." Candida - staged by Bay Theatre through May 30 - is the story of the wife of the Rev. James Morell of East London. From the moment audience members enter Bay Theatre's intimate space, they are ensconced in a Victorian drawing room, complete with a working fireplace.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 31, 2002
George Bernard Shaw described his romantic-triangle comedy, Candida, as "a religious play," and director Richard Romagnoli's production at Olney Theatre Center takes that idea and runs with it. Though the playwright left little unsaid, Romagnoli underlines almost everything. It's not enough that Shaw named the character of a minister "Rev. Morell" (pronounced "moral") and called his frank, truth-telling wife "Candida." After intermission, Valerie Leonard's Candida appears draped in a shawl that gives more than a hint of the Virgin Mary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Pauline Mayer and By Pauline Mayer,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
The Seven Sisters, by Margaret Drabble. Harcourt. 320 pages. $25. Starting with her first triumph, A Summer Bird-Cage, Margaret Drabble's quintessential protagonist has been an intellectually and morally enlightened English woman (not unlike Drabble herself) struggling with contemporary issues as well as with her own personal dreams and demons. Not so the divorced and dispossessed heroine of The Seven Sisters, who, when first encountered, is clueless and floundering. Married young, perennially the dutiful and dependent helpmate, and now in her late fifties, Candida Wilton has been dumped by her caddish husband, the headmaster of an exclusive Suffolk boarding school.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 13, 1991
When most people think of a dramaturg -- if they're familiar with the term at all -- they probably envision an academic in an ivory tower poring over obscure texts related to a theatrical production. But ivory towers have never interested Rick Davis, who was named associate artistic director at Center Stage last summer after four years as that theater's resident dramaturg."I always tried to introduce myself as the dirty-hands dramaturg," says the easygoing, bearded Mr. Davis, 33. Even in the literary post of dramaturg, he explains, he attempted to have hands-on contact with whatever production he was researching.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 17, 1991
Staging an 18th century farce outdoors presents two obvious problems.First, most farces require at least a half dozen doors, and doors are rarely found among the flora and fauna. Second, period farces tend to have incredibly convoluted plots, and holding an audience's attention in the heat of a Baltimore summer could be a lot to expect.Happily, the Bowman Ensemble, which performs on the campus of McDonogh School, has overcome both of these obstacles with its delightful production of Carlo Goldoni's "The Fan."
NEWS
March 16, 2005
On Monday, March 14, 2005, ANGELO, loving son of the late Giovanni and Candida Lissotto Dalla Tezza and stepson of the late Angelina Dalla Tezza; beloved husband of Gina Dalla Tezza (nee Dell'Angelo); devoted father of Linda J. Goguen, Richard A. Dalla Tezza, Sr. and Robert G. Dalla Tezza; also survived by step-sister Norma Boer, seven grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, numerous nieces and nephews, and other family members. Predeceased by brothers Chester and Luigi. Funeral Services will be held at the Pritts Funeral Home and Chapel, 412 Washington Road, Westminster on Friday at 11 A.M. Interment will be in Meadow Branch Cemetery, Westminster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Pauline Mayer and By Pauline Mayer,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
The Seven Sisters, by Margaret Drabble. Harcourt. 320 pages. $25. Starting with her first triumph, A Summer Bird-Cage, Margaret Drabble's quintessential protagonist has been an intellectually and morally enlightened English woman (not unlike Drabble herself) struggling with contemporary issues as well as with her own personal dreams and demons. Not so the divorced and dispossessed heroine of The Seven Sisters, who, when first encountered, is clueless and floundering. Married young, perennially the dutiful and dependent helpmate, and now in her late fifties, Candida Wilton has been dumped by her caddish husband, the headmaster of an exclusive Suffolk boarding school.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 31, 2002
George Bernard Shaw described his romantic-triangle comedy, Candida, as "a religious play," and director Richard Romagnoli's production at Olney Theatre Center takes that idea and runs with it. Though the playwright left little unsaid, Romagnoli underlines almost everything. It's not enough that Shaw named the character of a minister "Rev. Morell" (pronounced "moral") and called his frank, truth-telling wife "Candida." After intermission, Valerie Leonard's Candida appears draped in a shawl that gives more than a hint of the Virgin Mary.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
An article in Friday's Evening Sun incorrectly reported that Candida Ewing Steel, the great-great granddaughter of Thomas Ewing Jr., would be leaving her law practice to start her own business. Steel will continue her law practice as well as begin a new business, Anne Arundel Dispute Resolution.Candida Ewing Steel stood across from her opposing counsel in the divorce case. He introduced himself as Richard J. Mudd.Very casually, Steel asked opposing counsel if by any chance he was related to Dr. Samuel Mudd, the man alleged to have been an accessory in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 17, 1991
Staging an 18th century farce outdoors presents two obvious problems.First, most farces require at least a half dozen doors, and doors are rarely found among the flora and fauna. Second, period farces tend to have incredibly convoluted plots, and holding an audience's attention in the heat of a Baltimore summer could be a lot to expect.Happily, the Bowman Ensemble, which performs on the campus of McDonogh School, has overcome both of these obstacles with its delightful production of Carlo Goldoni's "The Fan."
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | January 16, 1991
MARY MEASE WARREN wears her theatrical productions like jewels. For "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," she has a bracelet of brightly colored stones, a rainbow of the colors in the costumes she designed. And to celebrate "Candida," Center Stage's current play set in the romantic Victorian era, she has taken to wearing a delicate cameo brooch that Candida, the housewife heroine, would appreciate.At 41, the costume designer has zig-zagged from Broadway tBaltimore, Chicago to Pittsburgh, where she temporarily chucked her theater career to raise two young sons.
NEWS
March 16, 2005
On Monday, March 14, 2005, ANGELO, loving son of the late Giovanni and Candida Lissotto Dalla Tezza and stepson of the late Angelina Dalla Tezza; beloved husband of Gina Dalla Tezza (nee Dell'Angelo); devoted father of Linda J. Goguen, Richard A. Dalla Tezza, Sr. and Robert G. Dalla Tezza; also survived by step-sister Norma Boer, seven grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, numerous nieces and nephews, and other family members. Predeceased by brothers Chester and Luigi. Funeral Services will be held at the Pritts Funeral Home and Chapel, 412 Washington Road, Westminster on Friday at 11 A.M. Interment will be in Meadow Branch Cemetery, Westminster.
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | January 16, 1991
MARY MEASE WARREN wears her theatrical productions like jewels. For "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," she has a bracelet of brightly colored stones, a rainbow of the colors in the costumes she designed. And to celebrate "Candida," Center Stage's current play set in the romantic Victorian era, she has taken to wearing a delicate cameo brooch that Candida, the housewife heroine, would appreciate.At 41, the costume designer has zig-zagged from Broadway tBaltimore, Chicago to Pittsburgh, where she temporarily chucked her theater career to raise two young sons.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 13, 1991
When most people think of a dramaturg -- if they're familiar with the term at all -- they probably envision an academic in an ivory tower poring over obscure texts related to a theatrical production. But ivory towers have never interested Rick Davis, who was named associate artistic director at Center Stage last summer after four years as that theater's resident dramaturg."I always tried to introduce myself as the dirty-hands dramaturg," says the easygoing, bearded Mr. Davis, 33. Even in the literary post of dramaturg, he explains, he attempted to have hands-on contact with whatever production he was researching.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
STAGE GEORGE Bernard Shaw's ''Candida'' without care, and you run the risk of losing your audience. Do it as well as Center Stage is doing it, and you're likely to please everybody.Do the play carelessly, and the minister will end up a blundering bore. Do his wife carelessly, and she may wind up being unsympathetic, even irritating. Do Marchbanks off key, and he can be impossible.At Center Stage, all the leading players are on key. Richard Poe, as Rev. Morell, is righteous without being pompous.
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