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NEWS
August 17, 2012
As a radiation oncologist here in Bel Air, I wanted to share an issue that could affect the cancer treatment of a great many of our friends and neighbors. Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed a change to the way free standing radiation oncology practices are reimbursed for their services. The end result is a $300 million cut to cancer care, which will have unfortunate consequences for patients who require radiation treatment. Most patients with cancer require radiation treatments in the course of their care.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Toshiba data center has moved into the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, collaborating with the medical institution's radiation oncology department to improve treatment of patients with head and neck or lung cancers. The Toshiba Center for Big Data in Healthcare is based in the East Baltimore research park's Rangos Building at 855 N. Wolfe St. The data center will work with Hopkins researchers to use advanced image analysis and data mining to suggest what outcomes patients could expect from treatment plans based on the outcomes of patients with similar anatomy, physiology, pathology and history.
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
More than 1,000 people rode bicycles 150 miles - in the rain, for part of the way - this weekend to raise $2.6 million for cancer research at Johns Hopkins. The funds from the inaugural Ride to Conquer Cancer in Washington, D.C. on Saturday will support the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington and Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. Organizers said the money raised will allow researchers to personalize cancer treatment and screening methods for each patient.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
The University of Maryland's growing BioPark in West Baltimore will get a $200 million boost from plans announced Wednesday by the School of Medicine to team with private partners on a state-of-the-art proton cancer treatment center. Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown said the center would create 325 construction jobs, 110 permanent jobs and attract 2,000 patients a year. "It will also continue the state's and Baltimore City's investment in the communities of West Baltimore," he said.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1993
Older men with early-stage prostate cancer may be better off waiting and having regular checkups and tests to monitor their cancer than having surgery or radiation therapy, says a new report.The study in yesterday's Journal of the American Medical Association is likely to stir controversy among doctors and the public about the effectiveness of surgery and radiation to treat prostate cancer, the most common kind of cancer among American men.Surgery and radiation for men older than 60 with early stages of prostate cancer may not help them live longer and may put them at risk for complications, particularly impotence and incontinence, which may "severely degrade quality of life," the study said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 1993
Former Sen. Paul E. Tsongas of Massachusetts was admitted to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston yesterday for further treatment of lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system, officials of the hospital said.Mr. Tsongas, a Democratic Party presidential candidate last year, was reported in good condition. He entered the hospital for monitoring of the chemotherapy he is receiving in his latest battle against lymphoma.Mr. Tsongas, 51, said in a statement that he had asked Dana-Farber officials not to issue further statements about his condition until the treatment is completed.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that its first-quarter loss narrowed as sales of its Gliadel treatment for brain cancer grew. The Baltimore-based company also told investors in a conference call that it was discontinuing development of its Lidomer treatment for post-surgical pain and narrowing the focus of its efforts to develop the cancer treatment Paclimer as part of cost-cutting moves. Guilford reported a net loss of $13.5 million, or 45 cents a share, on revenue of $6.2 million.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2008
The children of a 62-year-old Indiana woman are trying to pressure a Maryland biotech company into treating their mother's pancreatic cancer with an experimental drug not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The three daughters of Connie Loughman held a news conference at their parents' Indianapolis home yesterday, pleading for access to the drug. They have launched a video on YouTube devoted to their mother's plight and set up a Web site asking people to e-mail executives at Gaithersburg's GenVec Inc., which is testing the promising cancer treatment.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2002
Doctors had hoped to operate on the cancer in Rhio Weir's lungs that January morning almost two years ago. But when Weir, a 63-year-old underwriter for a title company, awoke, he was told the tumors were in the lining of his lungs and couldn't be removed. "The doctor told me the news was very bad, that the only thing I could do was radiation and chemotherapy," the Los Angeles man recalls. But there was something else Weir could do - and did. He stepped outside the circle of conventional cancer therapy for aspects of his treatment.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Because of advanced treatments, curing prostate cancer has become more common. There now are more than 2.5 million survivors in the United States. Still, many men suffer from side effects after treatment, which may be a deterrent to obtaining care or even discussing the matter with a doctor. But early diagnosis and appropriate treatment will provide the best outcomes, according to Dr. Ira E. Hantman, a urologist with Urology Specialists of Maryland at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Toshiba data center has moved into the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, collaborating with the medical institution's radiation oncology department to improve treatment of patients with head and neck or lung cancers. The Toshiba Center for Big Data in Healthcare is based in the East Baltimore research park's Rangos Building at 855 N. Wolfe St. The data center will work with Hopkins researchers to use advanced image analysis and data mining to suggest what outcomes patients could expect from treatment plans based on the outcomes of patients with similar anatomy, physiology, pathology and history.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Former Johns Hopkins surgeon Dr. Ben Carson has been named chairman of the board of Frederick biotechnology company Vaccinogen Inc., which also announced Monday it received a commitment of up to $80 million from a Swedish investor. The company is readying for clinical trials of OncoVAX, a cancer treatment it has shown to prevent recurrence in colon cancer patients. An investor group known as The Investment Syndicate, led by Swedish entrepreneur Anders Halldin, invested $10 million in Vaccinogen and pledged $70 million more in four installments, contingent on the company hitting certain milestones.
NEWS
May 18, 2013
Oh, no! Here we go again with another "awareness conversation" ("Breast cancer: Angelina Jolie starts the conversation," May 16). After the fortunes raised by Race for the Cure and the other breast cancer groups, must we consider having both our breasts removed? I'm beginning to think being a woman is a life-long death sentence. In "starting the conversation," why didn't Angelina Jolie mention how much her surgery, reconstruction and rehabilitation cost? If an initial exam is $3,000, what is the price of the entire procedure?
EXPLORE
May 13, 2013
Upper Chesapeake Health (UCH) is pleased to announce that it has named Dr. Philip Nivatpumin has been named by Upper Chesapeake Health as medical director of the UCH Patricia D. and M. Scot Kaufman Cancer Center. The Kaufman Cancer Center is currently under construction on the UCMC campus in Bel Air and is expected to open in the fall. Nivatpumin is well-known to Harford County, where he is a medical oncologist with Upper Chesapeake Hematology/Oncology, a mainstay in the community.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Over the next two weeks, Orioles reliever Adam Russell will get a visit from two of his biggest fans. Fiona Galvin, 6, and her three-year-old brother Tommy will light up at the first sight of their "Uncle Bubba. " In the offseason, he's the one who takes them to the park back home in Cleveland. He will take Tommy to baseball practice. He will dress up like Bigfoot to make them laugh. The kids will climb onto Russell and make him their personal 6-foot-7 jungle gym. Russell, 29, is fighting for a job in the Orioles' spring training camp.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1997
The director of the National Institutes of Health has refused to "march in" and give CellPro Inc. license to patents owned by the Johns Hopkins University for a cancer treatment system.CellPro had invoked an obscure legal provision to get around a federal judge's ruling that CellPro infringed on Hopkins' patents by building and marketing a blood-filtering device for cancer patients.Under the "march-in" clause of the Bayh-Dole Act, the government can grant a compulsory license if the public is being deprived of access to a vital product.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Former Johns Hopkins surgeon Dr. Ben Carson has been named chairman of the board of Frederick biotechnology company Vaccinogen Inc., which also announced Monday it received a commitment of up to $80 million from a Swedish investor. The company is readying for clinical trials of OncoVAX, a cancer treatment it has shown to prevent recurrence in colon cancer patients. An investor group known as The Investment Syndicate, led by Swedish entrepreneur Anders Halldin, invested $10 million in Vaccinogen and pledged $70 million more in four installments, contingent on the company hitting certain milestones.
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Brides-to-be can browse hundreds of designer and gently worn wedding gowns at the Brides Against Breast Cancer "Tour of Gowns" this Valentine's Day weekend at the Sheraton Baltimore City Center Hotel. "These brides are really progressive because they can buy their dresses anywhere, but they choose Brides Against Breast Cancer because it supports a great cause," says Amy Paulishak, vice president of business development for Brides Against Breast Cancer. "Every time a bride finds her gown, we ring a bell and the DJ makes an announcement.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | October 12, 2012
Living with cancer is not easy, but HealingPoint Acupuncture and Healing Arts in Columbia offers services to help ease the pain. Bridget Hughes founded HealingPoint as a general acupuncture practice with her husband, Brandon, in 2001. “We had no idea at the time that we would become so integrated into the oncology community in Howard County,” she says. After a local oncologist realized one of her patients had recovered from the severe side effects associated with radiation and chemotherapy after an acupuncture treatment at HealingPoint, word spread throughout the community.
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